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Song of the Open Road

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Song of the Open Road

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01 Apr, 2017 to 18 Jun, 2017

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Song of the Open Road
Vikky Alexander, Robert Arndt, Gerard Byrne, Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyn, Kelly Jazvac, Kelly Lycan, Niamh O’Malley, Dawit L. Petros, Greg Staats, Lisa Tan
April 1 to June 18, 2017

B.C. Binning, Alvin Balkind Galleries, Events room, Window Spaces and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada line
Presented in partnership with Capture Photography Festival

“You road I enter upon and look around, I believe you are not all that is here,
I believe that much unseen is also here.

I believe you are latent with unseen existences, you are so dear to me.”
—Walt Whitman, “Song of the Open Road” (1856)

Taking its title from a poem by Walt Whitman, the Contemporary Art Gallery presents a group exhibition as the central feature of this year’s Capture Photography Festival. Work is presented both inside and outside and across all of the gallery’s spaces, embracing a diverse set of conditions and approaches centred in a conceptual understanding of an expanded field of photographic practice that examines notions of what you see is most definitely not what you get.

Bringing together artists from Canada, Eritrea, Ireland, Sweden, and the US, the exhibition includes works that combine thematically to interrogate ideas rooted in photographic histories, engaging ideas such as veracity, recollection, remembrance, belonging, staging, and how the image documents and records these or is evidence of differing realities.

Key to the exhibition is Images or shadows of divine things (2005–), an ongoing series by Irish artist Gerard Byrne. Visually rich and intellectually complex, the artist’s work in photography, film, theatre, and multiscreen installation examines the slippage between time and the act of image creation. Presented here, a selection of these black-and-white photographs seems to depict a much earlier period, evoking vernacular photographic idioms of American midcentury photography and thus pointing toward the relationship between time, appearance, and the photographic document. Through a collection of over twenty images, a sense emerges that the series has a certain scale of vision. However, it is more about picturing the historical “conditions” of image making than it is about riffing on an aesthetic. That sense of conditions emerges only once the particularity of the given images is surpassed—that is when it becomes obvious that the specifics of the images are not the point, this realization becoming palpable when a sufficient number of them are grouped together.

Robert Arndt’s activities search and reveal the means of accessing culture and history through the mediated forms of books, magazines and the Internet. Made for the exhibition, Remainders, Repeats and Rejects (2017) is characteristic in its investigation of production whereby documentation itself becomes the artwork. Alongside a large-scale photograph of the gallery wall on which it sits atop, Arndt’s work collects and conflates personal imagery with found and staged scenarios, highlighting the notion that documentation may be all that is required for an idea to exist and resonate. We imagine wide ranging connections, invent narratives and recognize links between images, all thoughts set in motion to create a diversity of potential meaning.

Recent work by Canadian artist Kelly Lycan includes installations based on 291, the iconic New York photography gallery opened by Alfred Stieglitz in 1905. These recreations are developed through sourcing images, in an attempt to uncover an understanding or experience of the space while drawing on simulations of the photographic illusion of this. Song of the Open Road features a new version of Nearby Nearby: 291 Burlap Walls (2015), composed of a series of images of the walls of 291 culled from Internet searches, books, videos and museums. Five images were printed on standard letterhead paper, then photocopied on a variety of machines through different companies in the US, Mexico and Canada, resulting in a series of colour shifts and image quality away from the black and white originals. The resulting installation creates a pixelated arena of varicoloured white grounds, where it is as if each image is forensically being drawn from some depths to emerge on the paper’s surface, evoking an atmospheric quality not dissimilar to Stieglitz’s “Equivalent” series of cloud photographs.

As a contemporary of artists such as Richard Prince, James Welling and Sherrie Levine who were active in New York in the early 1980s, Vikky Alexander is often associated with the Pictures Generation. She is best known for work that foregrounds a strong interest in the histories of architecture, design, and fashion, often focusing on locations such as shopping malls, showrooms, and show apartments—sites of desire, aspirations, and ideas of home. The images are often complicated through light, reflections, and refractions and speak of a set of conditions and values embedded in appearances as seen through furnishings and the notional view from the window (here, a large-scale photo mural). Shown outdoors at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Model Suite (Sliding Door) (2005/17) interplays with its architectural surroundings; the station’s glass pavilion lends a further physical and visual layer as we see the daily activity on the street through the work itself.

Ambient Advertising (2016), installed across the CAG’s windows, is a reconfigured work by Toronto-based Kelly Jazvac. Salvaged billboard images that she has reframed, manipulated and cut through, seemingly in reference to a quintessential Canadian landscape, visually envelop the gallery at street level. Taken from contemporary advertising, the imagery appeals to our collective sense of identity through reference to the romantic and awesome natural world that surrounds us while questioning the feeding of desire as driven by contemporary consumer culture.

Alongside photographic work in a variety of processes, the exhibition also includes moving-image works. Sunsets (2012), by American artist Lisa Tan, combines literature and various historical and personal references to materially explore the intricate relationship between language, image, and experience. The video, filmed on the threshold between night and day, unfolds like a conversation. Seemingly inconsequential things pop up and take hold: a phone call interrupts, the sun starts to set, a stranger asks a question, translations are needed. The work narrates Tan’s engagement with enigmatic writers, with histories, technologies, and geographies that she knows, in order to mediate those that she doesn’t.

Concerned with issues of visibility and the slippage between a moment and an image, Irish artist Niamh O’Malley investigates the construction and arrangement of time and document as revealed through the moving image. Across two large-scale screens, the silent black-and-white video Glasshouse (2014) unfolds as a lengthy tracking shot. As the camera moves seamlessly from left to right along the glass panes, the natural idyll disappears here and there as the glass becomes more or less opaque. Through this O’Malley draws our attention to the process of looking, the camera seemingly attempting to locate and uncover meaning. Yet as images fragment, blocked by stained and broken glass, such efforts are thwarted, challenging our perception of what it is we are actually viewing and of how the images are constructed.

Born in Montreal and currently working in Stockholm, Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn investigates issues of historicity, collectivity, utopian politics, and multiculturalism, often revealing the unnoticed political relevance of seemingly trivial historical anecdotes by shedding light on stories overlooked, hidden, or deemed otherwise insignificant. Seizing Hold of a Memory as It Flashes Up (2010) is a blind embossing using the speech of twelve-year-old Severn Suzuki, daughter of Japanese Canadian science communicator and environmental activist David Suzuki, delivered at the 1992 Earth Summit. Suzuki and members of ECO, the Environmental Children’s Organization, raised the money to travel from Vancouver to Brazil so they could attend the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro. Here, Suzuki delivered her speech before 172 representatives of different countries, 108 heads of state, and some 2,400 NGO representatives; 17,000 of the people who attended the parallel NGO Global Forum had consultative status, resulting in a meeting that ultimately led to the Kyoto Protocol.

Toronto-based artist Greg Staats, Kanien’kehá:ka (b. Ohsweken, Six Nations of the Grand River Territory) whose works combine language, mnemonics and the natural world as an ongoing process of conceptualising a Haudenosaunee restorative aesthetic that defines the multiplicity of relationships with trauma and renewal. Staats addresses the systemic deficit of language—through personal and community archives and an intellectual and aesthetic interpretation of the body and ceremony. The installation untitled (objects of reciprocal thinking) (2014) combines both works from the beginning of the artist’s reflection of public and private within a Haudenosaunee linguistic and mnemonic continuum linked to place and recent works based on a reciprocal methodology. When at the edge of one’s condolence and within the liminal metaphysical space prior to renewal, there lies a hesitancy to move forward. While external and internal barriers must be overcome, the process must be completed with the help of others, both as witnesses and holders of the good mind. This ceremonial movement is comparable to moving from the darkness of the forest into the clearing where the light illuminates breath and one’s footing becomes clearer. The Mid-Winter (renewal) ceremony Gaihwayao:ni:, translated as “encouragement,” employs reciprocal gestures and words, repeatable to lifting up the mind after it has dropped down during condolence and/or post-trauma.

Chicago-based Canadian Eritean artist Dawit L. Petros similarly reflects through personal and cultural histories on ideas surrounding place making that are centred on a critical rereading of the relationship between African histories and European modernism. The book About the Author’s Journey from Ethiopia to Italy and about the Impressions Made on Him by His Stay in That Country in Tigrinya, by nineteenth-century writer Fesseha Giyorgis, was the first text published in the Tigrinya language (used in present-day Eritrea and Ethiopia). Using this as a guide, Petros undertook the journey from Ethiopia to Italy, his contemporary journey mirroring the historical passage across the Mediterranean Sea as well as the one undertaken by those currently fleeing to safety. When he arrived in Italy, the artist met a group of Eritrean migrants, with whom he made Untitled (2016), a collection of images with these individuals holding mirrors or archive materials in visual dialogue with the surrounding landscape. Viewed together, the photographs offer a metaphor-rich articulation of the fluidity of contemporary transnational experiences and attendant issues of cultural negotiation, speaking to how images and objects enable a sense of belonging or retrieval, both public and private.

We acknowledge the generous financial support of the following:

Vikky Alexander: Presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program—IntransitBC
Niamh O’Malley: Culture Ireland
Greg Staats: The Banff Centre, via a thematic residency program; the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario; and the Canada Council for the Arts/Conseil des arts du Canada
Lisa Tan: Iaspis, the Swedish Arts Grants Committee’s International Programme for Visual Artists

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Artists/Participants:
Vikky Alexander  
Robert Arndt  
Gerard Byrne  
Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn  
Kelly Jazvac  
Kelly Lycan  
Niamh O’Malley  
Dawit L. Petros  
Greg Staats  
Lisa Tan  



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Meet at CAG at 6pm, drinks at 7pm at Opus Bar in Yaletown

Join us for an exclusive evening with artist Vikky Alexander. Alexander is one of Vancouver’s most acclaimed artists, often considered in association with the “Pictures Generation” and photo-conceptualism, she is best known for her large-scale photo mural installations and multimedia works that combine photography with sculptural objects.

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We will be meeting at 6pm at the CAG and will walk collectively to the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line.

Sign up as a Young Patron today and begin your membership with the chance to meet Vikky personally over complimentary drinks at the Opus Bar after the talk.

In becoming part of the CAG Young Patrons community, you are joining a network of art-minded young professionals, artists and other creatives. Attend behind-the-scenes art gatherings that are both social and educational (drink and learn about contemporary art), from studio visits, to collections tours and more, as well as exciting events with our dynamic community partners. New members will also receive a limited edition publication and artist edition. If you are interested in learning more about the Young Patrons, please email [email protected]

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‘Song of the Open Road’
Vikky Alexander, Robert Arndt, Gerard Byrne, Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn, Kelly Jazvac, Kelly Lycan, Niamh O’Malley, Dawit L. Petros, Greg Staats and Lisa Tan
April 1 to June 18, 2017
Public opening: Saturday, April 1, 4-6pm, all welcome!
Contemporary Art Gallery and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line.

Presented in partnership with Capture Photography Festival, 2017

Taking its title from a poem by Walt Whitman, the Contemporary Art Gallery presents a group exhibition as the central feature of this year’s Capture Photography Festival.

Bringing together ten artists from Canada, Eritrea, Ireland, Sweden and USA, the exhibition presents an expanded field of photographic practice encompassing still, documentary traditions through to digital technologies and moving image, which through black-and-white silver gelatin prints, digital printouts from Internet searches and found archive materials, collectively examine notions of what you see is most definitely not what you get.

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“It is a grave matter to leave your land and your people and to go alone to an alien country. Although it becomes a simple matter later, at the beginning, when you think deeply, your heart lacks ease and repose.”

From An Ethiopian’s Voyage to Italy at the End of the 19th Century by Däbtära Fesseha Giyorgis Abiyäzgi

In 1890, Däbtära Fesseha Giyorgis Abiyäzgi traveled from Massawa, Eritrea to Italy. His written account of the journey is the first known secular text to be published in Tigrinya and the first travelogue in Eritrean literature.

Nearly 125 year later, Eritrean-born artist Dawit L. Petros began a journey not unlike Giyorgis’ across Africa and through Europe. A stop in Catania, Italy allowed Petros to connect with Eritrean migrants with whom he created a collection of images of them holding mirrors and archival documents.

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In Untitled (Overlapping and intertwined territories that fall from view II), Catania, Italy, a young man holds up a sheet from a 19th century Italian newspaper printed in Eritrea which reads “Spazio disponibile”. The text translates literally to “available space” which originally indicated potential advertising space. In Petros’ photograph, it takes on new meaning: the space offers an opportunity to present new and overlooked narratives. In a contemporary context, “available space” is as promising as it is fraught –we now have the highest displacement levels on record.

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On February 1st, 1977, Clarice Lispector sat down for her first and only television interview. That same year, Lispector would be diagnosed with inoperable ovarian cancer and would pass away on December 9th, on the eve of what would have been her 57th birthday.

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Although we catch glimpses of her on Tan’s computer screen, Lispector’s presence most often takes the form of her words as translated remotely by Tan’s friend via Skype. Acting as a soundtrack, the translation is informal, full of hesitations and pauses that trace the movement of one language into the next. Sunsets unfolds almost episodically, fading to black in a way that makes its structure much like its namesake. Recorded in Sweden in the early hours of morning during the summer and the mid-afternoon during the winter, Lisa Tan’s work reflects the rituals of its making. Her close ups are often inscrutable but what they produce is unmistakable: the strange and contradictory feelings of loss, anxiety, hope and renewal that the waning light of the day brings.

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Andi Icaza-Largaespada’s practice — of image-reading and image-making — suggests a continuation of symbolic and subversive acts of resistance. Her multidisciplinary work incorporates elements of social research, ethics and sustainability and takes the forms of photography, sculpture and writing. Through her work, Icaza-Largaespada seeks to honour the emancipating labour of the women of Mina El Limon, Rancho Grande and Nueva Guinea in Nicaragua and the growing localized efforts of alternative community building.

The BFA graduation exhibition Lazy Susan at Audain Galleries continues until April 22. Congratulations to all the graduating students:

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