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Performance

This year CAG Young Patrons are hosting a series of Happy Hours where we partner with other Vancouver organizations and individuals. This month we are partnering with dancers from Ballet BC where they will be performing in our space.

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Happy Hour | Ballet BC


The Big Draw
Saturday October, 1, 12–3pm
Free, drop-in activities
At CAG, 555 Nelson Street

As our contribution to this city-wide festival, CAG will present Walking a Line, a series of collaborative drawing experiences for all ages are created by students as part of Community, Collaboration and Pedagogy, a studio course with Emily Carr University of Art and Design hosted by CAG.

Story-gami Workshop
Jamie Chen, Madison Mayhew, Mary Seto, John Song and Patrick Takata

Create a drawing inspired by a story on a colourful sheet of paper. Learn how to fold your story into an origami link that will be joined with others to make one long continuous chain of different cultural stories.

Blind Drawing Workshop
Claudia Adiwijaya, Lexi Hilderman, Kayla Heald, Karen Nguyen and Nushin Yazdani

“Can you draw? No? Perfect, this workshop is for you! In this workshop you will have fun creating drawings without looking at them. These drawings will inspire you to share thoughts, questions and ideas that emerge while drawing.

Connect the Dots Walk
Mariah Brusatore, Michael King, Mo Qutob and Justine Zimmerman

This special guide will lead you on a drawing inspired walk from the CAG to ArtStarts while providing interesting social and historical information about the area. Activities in the booklet include texture rubbings, eye spy, tracing and observational drawing.

Drawing on the City Walk
Andrea Landivar Einstoss, Hana Kujawa and Emma Plested

With sidewalk chalk attached to sticks, we will be creating drawings that use the city as a canvas. As we walk we will create a pathway of colourful lines, stopping to create drawings based on things we see along the way.

Presented as part of The Big Draw, the world’s largest drawing festival and Culture Days, a Canada-wide celebration that raises the awareness, accessibility, participation and engagement of Canadians in the arts and cultural life of their communities.

For more information and workshop times visit: www.drawvancouver.com

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CAG & The Big Draw - Walking a Line


In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
Performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, CAG will host her at the Burrard Marina Field House to process the experience and produce work.

At this event, held at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, Raheem will also perform a new work in response to her time at sea.

Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and Contemporary Art Gallery.

Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union.

More information at accessgallery.ca

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In Conversation - Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips - with performance by the artist


Amaara Raheem
May 16 to June 8, 2016

In partnership with Access Gallery and Burrard Arts Foundation’s Twenty-three Days at Sea, CAG hosts artist Amaara Raheem at the Burrard Marina Field House for a one month production period.

Twenty-three Days at Sea offers a unique residency aboard a cargo ship sailing from Vancouver to Shanghai. Raheem, Sri Lankan born, and now based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, is an in(ter)dependent dance artist. Feeding off her own experience of in-betweenness, Raheem’s practice investigates the aesthetics and ethics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. Currently a PhD Candidate in the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University, Raheem is ultimately interested in questioning the coherence of systems that humans create to “know” the world around them, creating arrangements that offer uncertainty, play and new possibilities.

Following the residency, Raheem will feature in the group exhibition Twenty-three Days at Sea, Chapter One: Nour Bishouty, Christopher Boyne, Elisa Ferrari and Amaara Raheem which opens at Access Gallery on May 27, 2016.

In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
With performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7:00 PM
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is ‘Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s’ fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, the Contemporary Art Gallery will host her at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio to process the experience and produce her work for the exhibition, which opens May 27, 2016.

At this event, held in her temporary place of residence at the CAG Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, and Raheem will perform a new work in response to her time at sea. More information to follow at accessgallery.ca.
Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects, and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and the Contemporary Art Gallery. Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. Access is grateful for the ongoing support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the British Columbia government through the BC Arts Council and BC Gaming, the City of Vancouver, and our donors, members, and volunteers.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Amaara Raheem


Camille Norment and Experimental Music UnitSongs for Glass Island, was presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, at Pyatt Hall, VSO School of Music. It was an engaging, performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Norment collaborating with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

It is intriguing that their collaborative sonic exploration departed from Robert Smithson’s unrealized earthwork project for Southwest BC, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass), proposed shortly before he created the famous (or is it infamous?) Spiral Jetty. Smithson’s project to cover an islet in the Strait of Georgia with crushed glass was drowned by the noisy objections of environmentalists, yet it’s echoes live on through a completely different type of (sonic) exploration. So, how does one project live through the failure of another?

A highlight of Norment and EMU’s event was our introduction to the glass armonica, a rare and legendary instrument dating back to the eighteenth century that uses glass, water and fingertips to create otherworldly sounds. These tuned glass “singing bowls” reputedly have healing properties, leading to reactions from the listener that vary from mesmerized to fearful, and even to a one-time ban on its use … strange but true! Mozart has even penned works for this enchanting instrument, and it’s other worldly sounds have accompanied music by contemporary musicians such as Linda Ronstadt, David Gilmour and Björk.

In an interview published in e-flux about her recent exhibition at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Norment touched on her fascination with the powers of sound: “I am interested in how music has long been used to facilitate both the forging and transgressing of cultural norms. Sound permeates all borders. Throughout history, fear has been associated with the paradoxical effects music has on the body and mind, and its power as a reward-giving de-centraliser of control.

Norment’s work has been described as visceral and poetic. From my personal perspective, much of my graduate research at SFU explores the human’s phenomenological relationship with the world, how our sensual experience with the surrounding environment plays a key role in defining who, and what, we are. Moreover, from an aural perspective, it is important to recognize that our location in the sonic environment is critical to our understanding and perception of it. I enjoyed exploring both of these concepts, and more, at Norment’s and EMU’s concert, immersing myself into the spellbinding soundscape.

– Jorma Kujala

Songs for Glass Island was presented by the CAG in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Tuning Into Other Worlds


Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7pm
Off-site: Pyatt Hall at VSO School of Music, Vancouver

Ticket available at: www.picatic.com/CAGglass

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a new performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Camille Norment in collaboration with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

Norment performs with a glass armonica, a legendary eighteenth century instrument that creates ethereal music from glass and water. Combined with EMU’s reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making, Norment and EMU will develop a work that resonates with local history.

Songs for Glass Island will use US visual artist Robert Smithson’s failed 1969 proposal for the Strait of Georgia, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass) as point of departure. Granted permission by the Canadian Government, Smithson planned encrusting Miami Islet west of Fraser Point in 100 tons of broken glass. However, as public pressure against the idea mounted from environmentalists and anti-Americanists, it was suspended by a governmental telegram. Aside from drawings, letters, and plans, the only physical artifacts which remain are studies which Smithson called “maps.” What would have been Smithson’s first “permanent” earthwork morphed via the idea’s failure into the famous Spiral Jetty made the following year.

Throughout March and April, Norment will be in residence at the University of Victoria where she will be writing and rehearsing with EMU members. Using glass in various forms as their primary instruments, they will prepare a set of inter-related works including newly developed instrumentation, that imagine the possible sounds, stories, textures and ecologies of Smithson’s fabled island. Reflecting the themes in structure and content, sound will weave viscerally through this glass world, the project residing in realistic and fantasy scenarios provoked by Smithson’s proposal: glass as a material; glass in acoustic and marine ecology; inevitable mounds of post-catastrophe glass shards; and metaphors associated with glass, such as glass ceilings, broken barriers, reflection, transparency and invisibility.

Through the creative process, the juxtaposition of the practices of sound and experimental music performance in glass will create a visually stunning and sonically captivating audiovisual concert-length program that will debut in progress at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and be followed by its premiere performance in Vancouver presented by CAG at Pyatt Hall. Recordings of these works and performances will be subject to a subsequent audio publication.
CAG will also partner later this year with Norment and the Montreal Biennale.

Camille Norment is a multidisciplinary American artist living in Oslo, Norway. Her work has been the subject of numerous international exhibitions and performances including the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2013) and a commissioned artwork and performance for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2012). In 2015 she presented Rapture, a site-specific, sculptural and sonic installation in the Nordic Pavilion for the Venice Biennale. She regularly performs and records with the Camille Norment Trio in which she plays the glass armonica.

EMU is a sound ensemble of LaSaM Music from Victoria, British Columbia featuring performer/composers Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, Paul Walde and producer Kirk McNally. During the past four years EMU has developed a reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making.

Songs for Glass Island is presented in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Camille Norment and Experimental Music Unit - Songs for Glass Island


Locations of the broadsheet boxes to pick up a free copy of MISSIVES. Created by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson, produced and presented by Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. The broadsheet publication and screening project is supported by The British Council.

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MISSIVES broadsheet box locations – Vancouver & Toronto


Screening event presented by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson
Presented by CAG in partnership with Cineworks.

Friday, February 12, 7pm
Cineworks Annex, 235 Alexander Street, Vancouver

Works screened include: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

‘Missives’, is a new free broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities.

The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

Alongside this, the screening event at Cineworks Annex (February 12 from 7pm), invokes a provisional social space, cinema and theatrical set where a temporary community may gather, through which a selection of film and video works explore first person narratives, interview, account and witness in queer Canadian moving image production, and reflect upon our viewing of it in a contemporary context. Presenting older works framed through their practice the evening engages an intergenerational conversation and includes: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

The MISSIVES broadsheet and screening event are generously supported by the British Council.

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Screening | Missives


Hazel Meyer
Muscle Panic
Sunday, January 31, 2016; 2pm
B.C. Binning Gallery

Hazel Meyer’s projects explore seemingly disparate yet overlapping preoccupations — intestines and athletics, feminism and the absurd, anxiety and textiles — using scale, language, repetition, gentle confrontation and ecstatic immersion. Recent projects include solo exhibitions at MacLaren Art Centre, Barrie and Art Metropole, Toronto; group exhibitions at Doris McCarthy Gallery, Scarborough and Trifecta Gallery, Las Vegas; publications with Little Joe (UK) and Idea Exchange, Cambridge and residencies at Embassy of Foreign Artists, Geneva and Scrap Metal Gallery, Toronto.

Hazel Meyer’s mutable body of work, Muscle Panic, considers the performance of the athletic. Evoking the imagery of momentous sports history, the bodily gestures and actions of a drill or warmup and the aesthetics of the gymnasium, Meyer instigates an arena of sweat and queer desire. Multiple iterations of Muscle Panic have taken the project from a rogue basketball gym built in an abandoned barn to a clandestine locker room to a warehouse-like gymnastics studio. Simultaneously an installation and a performance, Muscle Panic transforms the banal and austere white cube into a hot physically charged site for emotional and physical exchange. For CAG, Meyer has developed an installation of imagery and objects evoking the potentially queer sensibilities of the athletic. The installation will become the set for an afternoon event in which performers animate the set through a series of drills exploring endurance as gendered phenomena within sport.

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Hazel Meyer - Muscle Panic


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