EXHIBITIONS

Sarah Browne – How To Use Fool’s Gold

Loading
Gallery Hours
Tuesday to Sunday 12 - 6pm
Free Admission
 
Icon

Sarah Browne – How To Use Fool’s Gold

Info

ˇ

13 Jul, 2012 to 02 Sep, 2012

Use left (←) and right (→) arrow keys or swipe gestures on a touch device to navigate image gallery.


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the first North American exhibition by Dublin-based artist Sarah Browne, a survey including the artist’s entry for the 2009 Venice Biennale. Using ‘the economy’ as the basis for her artistic practice, Browne works with small communities of people, documenting resourceful forms of exchange to reveal the hidden social relations that exist in smallscale economic structures, summations of collective intention or desire typically influenced by emotional affects. Within the current context of austerity measures and failing markets, such an undertaking could not be more relevant. By processes such as filmmaking, sculpture and publishing the potential for a more radical resourcefulness is sought as a manifestation of creative opposition to prevailing systems. Vancouver with its immediate history of Vietnam draft dodgers and alternative island lifestyles provided an interesting backdrop for Browne’s work.

On February 17, 2012, in the midst of an unfolding European currency crisis, the Central Bank of France ceased to exchange French francs for euros, ending a system that has continued since the introduction of the euro and thus marking the demise of the franc altogether. Commissioned by the Contemporary Art Gallery and its partners, Browne’s film Second Burial at Le Blanc (2011–2012) follows a procession through Le Blanc, a small French town where local merchants continued to accept francs for goods and services. At the centre of this procession is Browne’s bespoke ‘ticker-tape countdown clock’, counting down the hours, minutes and seconds of the franc’s existence, the film completed in the days immediately following the end to the original currency

As the film unfolds, the commemorative nature of the event seems ever more poignant, a sort of anti-monument in progress to what Le Blanc represented as a working alternative to the current state of affairs across Europe and the world. Accompanying this are two newspapers, distributed free in the town and previous presentations, visual essays that weave together historical and anthropological information related to the work.

Several of Browne’s works explore redundant technologies and leftover industries. Her Carpet for the Irish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (2009) is made from surplus wool stocks from the Donegal Carpets factory. Once renowned for its hand-knotted carpets adorning Irish embassies around the globe, Donegal now produces carpets by machine or outsourced labour. The artist’s carpet was hand-knotted by two of the factory’s previous female employees and the design, reminiscent of Irish modernist Eileen Gray, was dictated by the proportions of surplus wool remaining at the old factory, now converted into a ‘heritage centre’. Works such as this positions Browne’s approach as rooted in documentary, operating from a principle of ‘critical proximity’ and using certain methods from the social sciences, particularly ethnography.

A Model Society (2007) stems from research in which Iceland was declared the happiest nation on earth. Browne advertised for knitwear models in Reykjavik newspapers and then surveyed respondents about the quality of life in Iceland. The models are presented within iconic Icelandic landscapes, wearing traditional Lopi sweaters in which selected phrases from their comments, such as ‘no war’ and ‘rotten politics’, have been knitted. In works like these, the artist taps into the personal, emotional underpinnings of both national identity and macroeconomic forces, the traditions of such knitting practice shared globally with other indigenous coastal communities, seen here on the west coast in Cowichan sweaters.

The film commission Second Burial at Le Blanc and the exhibition catalogue are coproduced by the Contemporary Art Gallery with Project Arts Centre, Dublin, Ireland and Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK.

The exhibition is generously supported by Culture Ireland and The Arts Council / An Chomhairle Ealaíon.

A full colour publication accompanies the exhibition, priced $38. It includes commissioned essays by Tessa Giblin, Curator of Visual Arts, Project
Arts Centre, Dublin and artist Jeremy Millar, plus texts by graphic designer Chris Lee and anthropologist Marshall Sahlins.

Connect

>




Categories

ˇ



Details

ˇ

Artists/Participants:
Sarah Browne  



Icon

Related Learning

This video interview with Irish artist Sarah Browne was created by Jessica Foley to coincide with the exhibition ‘How To Use Fool’s Gold’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, July 13 to September 2, 2012.

MORE

Video | Sarah Browne


Icon

Related Learning

Artist Sarah Browne discusses her work with CAG Director Nigel Prince, at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

MORE

Artist Talk | Sarah Browne


Icon

Related Blog Posts

Thank you to everyone who came to Sarah Browne’s talk on Saturday July 14th. We were delighted to welcome an excellent attendance to the gallery.

The event was timed to correspond with Sarah Browne’s exhibition, How To Use Fool’s Gold, which opened on Thursday July 12. During her talk, Browne spoke on the economic structures and social relations that are intrinsic to her work. The exhibition is titled after the work,  How to Use Fool’s Gold (Pyrite Radio) (2012), a crystal radio which collects the broadcasts that fill the air around us, a metaphor for those things of value that go unseen, revealed by a mineral mistaken as a precious commodity. The piece is the first work encountered, visitors are able to listen in on headphones.

This survey exhibition is Dublin-based artist Sarah Browne’s first exhibition in North America, the exhibition continues until September 2, 2012.

A full colour publication How To Use Fool’s Gold, accompanies the exhibition for the special exhibition price of $30. It includes essays by Tessa Giblin, Curator of Visual Arts, Project Arts Centre Dublin and artist Jeremy Millar. Also available are three more publications on Sarah Browne, A Model Society: Patterns & Thoughts, Sarah Browne/IrelandVenice and Lebensreform in Leitrim all available for sale at the gallery. For more information on all the publications visit: http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/#news

MORE
Icon

In CAG Shop

$38.00

Published:
183 pages

This publication accompanied the exhibition Sarah Browne, How To Use Fools Gold which was exhibited at the CAG, Ikon Gallery UK and Project Art Centre, Dublin and includes commissioned essays by Tessa Giblin, Curator of Visual Arts, Project Arts Centre, Dublin and artist Jeremy Millar, plus texts by graphic designer Chris Lee and anthropologist Marshall Sahlins.

MORE

Sarah Browne - How To Use Fool's Gold


Icon

In CAG Shop

$20.00

Published:
50 pages

The publication A Model Society: Patterns and Thoughts contains Lopi knitting patterns that came from two years of conversation between the artist Sarah Browne and people living in Iceland. These knitting patterns contain some of the fragments of these discussions about Icelandic Society that were knitted into the fabric of sweaters and the book illustrates how to knit or adapt these sweaters for yourself. The project A Model Society was orginially commissioned by Site-ations International in 2006 and received further funding from the Arts Council of Ireland. Along with the knitting patterns this publication includes texts by Sarah Browne, Gisli Palsson, WV FanWriter and an interview conversation between Sarah Browne and Tim Moylan. Printed in a  limited edition of 300.

MORE

Sarah Browne - A Model Society : Patterns and Thoughts


Icon

In CAG Shop

$15.00

Published:
63 pages

This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition Ireland Venice 2009, at the 53rd International Art Biennale, Venice, Italy curated by Caoimhin Corrigan. Ireland was represented by Sarah Browne, Gareth Kennedy and Kennedy Browne.
The publication includes essays by Tim Stott, Sarah Browne and J.K. Gibson-Graham. For more information go to: www.irelandvenice.ie.

MORE

Sarah Browne - Ireland/Venice


Icon

In CAG Shop

$15.00

Published:
111 pages

Sarah Browne developed the artwork Lebensreform in Leitrim through a residency at Leitrim Sculpture Center, Ireland. Her work has been supported through Rhyzom, a collaborative research network funded by the European Commission. This publication includes contributions from Jackie McKenna, DBC Pierre aka Peter Finlay, Ullrich Kochel, Ronnie Close among others.

MORE

Sarah Browne - Lebensreform in Leitrim


Icon

Visit CAG

555 Nelson Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada V6B 6R5

T 00 1 604 681 2700
F 00 1 604 683 2710

Gallery Hours
Tues – Sun 12 – 6 pm



  • Closed on British Columbia statutory holidays
  • The galleries are wheelchair accessible
  • The Gallery is free of charge
  • Suggested donation of $5


Reference Library



Icon

CAG Shop


Icon

Join/Give


Become a Member


The CAG is a not-for-profit reliant on member support. As a Member of the CAG, you are supporting contemporary art now and playing a role in its future.

Make a Donation


Help support the only free public art gallery in Vancouver.
Donate Now

Exhibition
Archive

01-14

top