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Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Marie Lorenz


Ryan Gander
Make every show like it’s your last
September 11 to November 1, 2015

The CAG presents an ambitious exhibition with UK artist Ryan Gander comprising a shifting selection of new and recent works centered on the artist’s ongoing conceptual investigations and playful cultural cross references.

Ideas of concealment, accessibility in every sense, and of a deliberate obfuscation to send our minds challenged and reeling, has been a constant ploy for Gander. Works are characterized most typically by a conceptual as well as formal rigour, often drawing together a layered range of sources and referents. For example in the video and associated off-site poster campaign, Imagineering (2013), there is a clear sense of play in the way work is constructed, and play as both an intellectual mode as well as a physical activity. The series of sculptures I is … (2013) evince a smart way with the art of storytelling in an immensely complex yet subtly coherent body of work which in its combination of the personal with the historical, delivers an emotional pull that is not only intellectually arresting, but also affecting in its humour, its delight in suggesting a dialogue between seemingly disparate objects or provoking associations tinged of sadness.

Organised by the CAG and produced in collaboration with Frac Île de France — Le Plateau, Paris; Manchester Art Gallery, UK; Centre for Contemporary Art, Derry~Londonderry, Northern Ireland; OK Offenes Kulturhaus / Center for Contemporary Art, Linz, Austria; Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, Colorado and Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal.

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Ryan Gander - Make every show like it's your last


Liz Magor
Six Ways to Sunday #06:
Peep Hole Art Centre, Milan, Italy
Via Stilicone, 10, Milano, Italy - www.peep-hole.org
September 24 to December 5, 2015

In autumn 2015 the Contemporary Art Gallery has been invited to take over Peep-Hole in Milan for the final instalment of their Six Ways to Sunday initiative.

On this occasion, CAG will present a major solo exhibition of work by Vancouver based artist Liz Magor. One of the most celebrated and influential figures of her generation, the exhibition will focus on a selection of recent and new work, and in a nod to the immediate historical context of Arte Povera in that area of Italy, primarily include a series of blankets including an ambitious new piece, alongside other sculptures incorporating fabric samples, clothing and labels.

The 1980s proved to be a momentous time in Magor’s career when her work was included in the Sydney Biennale (1982), the Venice Biennale (1984) and at Documenta 8 (1987) in Germany. During this time the artist’s work shifted towards an investigation of the social and emotional life of objects and their capacity to hold and reflect personal and collective histories and identities. Characteristic of her ongoing practice, the blanket works investigate the ontology of ordinary or familiar objects, which she remakes or repurposes, and presents in new contexts. These “serviceable objects” as she calls them, are redolent with association, discarded yet still imbued with and reflective of shared meaning.

 

 

 

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Liz Magor


Kim Beom
December 11, 2015 to January 24, 2016

For Kim Beom’s first solo exhibition in Canada, the Contemporary Art Gallery will present a selection of artwork spanning across twenty years of the artist’s practice. Kim stands as a pinnacle of contemporary art in South Korea. Working within a conceptual art framework, his ideas are grounded in the lateralization of image making from language to physical form. He often visualizes puns materially tipping language into the absurd creating comic forms that regularly draw from popular culture. This solo exhibition will function as a survey of his practice tracing shifts in material and form, as well as will follow a tangential line through his work that humorously pokes at the way we come to see and know things.

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Kim Beom


Julia Dault
Blame It On the Rain
May 1 to June 28, 2015
BC Binning and Alvin Balkind Galleries

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a major solo exhibition by Toronto-born, New York–based artist Julia Dault. Through a selection of new and recent works, the exhibition reveals the importance to Dault of balancing spontaneous gesture with responsiveness to rules, logic and the constraints of materials. Physical negotiations are central to Dault’s textured paintings and improvised sculptures; both are exhibited in Blame It On the Rain.

Dault is interested in ‘embodied knowledge’ — how making is thinking — and reinserts the artist’s hand into a minimal aesthetic primarily interpreted as distanced and industrial. The artist’s rule-based painting involves responding to mass-produced elements — patterned silks, pleather, unmixed paint straight from the tube — with unconventional tools, such as squeegees, rubber combs and sea sponges. The limitations of these objects create quasi-standardized gestures that allow Dault to skirt the line between expressive abstraction and cool, machine-like facture. Erasure of her paintings’ topmost layers, which allows viewers to ‘see into’ the painting process, is as important to Dault as paint application.

Exploration of artistic labor recurs in Dault’s sculptures. Always improvising on site and working alone, the artist manipulates and coerces Plexiglas, Formica and other industrially produced materials into imposing curved forms, then affixes them to the gallery wall using straps and cords. Dault’s efforts can be understood as ‘private performances’ in which her physical capabilities are juxtaposed with the properties of the materials she employs. Each sculpture is titled with a time stamp that reflects the duration it took to complete the piece. In this gesture, as with her paintings, she hopes to underline the durational nature of the art-making process.

Dault’s work fuses the emphasis on process found in both Abstract Expressionist painting and post-Minimal sculpture. One unifying element is the artist’s fascination with patterns, and with the slippages and imperfections that reveal the human origins of what appears mechanical. Another is the search for variety within strict limitations. By devising expressive gestures through rules and reasoning indicative of post-Minimal and Conceptual art, Dault is part of a generation of artists acknowledging histories and legacies of art making while revitalizing abstraction today.

The exhibition complements Color Me Badd, presented at The Power Plant, Toronto in 2014-2015. The two institutions are working together on the first major monograph of Dault’s work, to be published by Black Dog Publishing later in 2015. The publication is made with generous support from the RBC Emerging Artist Project.

BIO
Julia Dault lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She has held solo exhibitions at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2015); The Power Plant, Toronto and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles (2014); Galerie Bob van Orsouw, Zurich and Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto (2013); and White Cube Bermondsey, London (2012). She has also participated in group shows which include: Elevated, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (2014-2015), Americana: Selections from the Collection, Pérez Art Museum, Miami (2013–2014); Outside the Lines, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (2013–2014); In the Heart of the Country, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Inner Journeys, Maison Particulière, Brussels (2013); The Ungovernables, New Museum, New York; Roundtable, the Ninth Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2012); and Making Is Thinking, Witte de With, Rotterdam (2011). Her work is in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; Saatchi Gallery, London; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.

Dault is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York; Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto; and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles.

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Julia Dault - Blame It On the Rain


Shannon Bool
Michelangelo’s Place
May 1 to June 28, 2015

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the second part of a new commission in 2015 with Canadian artist Shannon Bool. Bool typically references a wide variety of art historical objects in her work, commenting on the role of decorative arts within art history, as well as on the change in meaning that occurs through the replication and alteration of significant cultural forms. Central to her practice is the paradoxical examination of the depth and psychological weight that surfaces carry, which she underlines in unorthodox material processes.

Located near to the gallery entrance is Michelangelo’s Place, the final version in a series of carrara marble benches Bool has recently produced.  The sculpture references the benches found circling the elevated Piazzale Michelangelo in Florence, built in 1869 to showcase copies of Michelangelo’s most famous works and to provide a panoramic view of the city.

At the Contemporary Art Gallery, Bool’s sculpture references the benches’ scale and appropriates the graffiti that covers them.  The graffiti, some of which is over 100 years old and ranges from tourist scribbles, love declarations and Italy’s first Labour Party, is mirrored to emphasize its materialization and the artist’s handwork. These energetic gestures of incision, gouging and defacing subvert the benches’ functionality by drawing attention to the individual experiences of the Piazzale’s visitors who chose to leave their own marks instead of consuming the magnificent views of the renaissance.  The carrara marble, signifying wealth and high renaissance material values is subjected instead to the every day banality of Florentine life and tourism, where the public turns away from its master narrative and carves its own signature.

Shannon Bool lives and works in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include: The Fourth Wall Through the Third Eye, Galerie Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf; Walk Like an Etruscan, Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto (2013); The Inverted Harem II, Bonner Kunstverein (2011);  CRAC Alsace, Altkirch, France; The Inverted Harem, GAK-Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen (2010); RMIT Project Space, Melbourne, Australia (2008). Group exhibitions include MMK2 Boom She Boom, Works from the MMK Collection, Frankfurt (2015); The Klöntal Triennale, Kunsthaus Glarus, Switzerland (2014); Soft Pictures, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaugengo, Turin (2013); Painting Forever!, KW, Berlin (2013); Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, Toronto (2013); the Sprengel Museum, Hannover (2012); 7×14, Kunsthalle Baden-Baden; Rock Opera, CACP Museum of Contemporary Art, Bordeaux (2009); Drawing on Sculpture: Graphic Interventions on the Photographic Surface, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds (2007); Make Your Move, Projects Arts Centre, Dublin; Spiralen der Erinnerung, Kunstverein in Hamburg; Carbonic Anhydride, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin (2006). Work is held in the collections of The National Gallery of Canada, Berlinische Galerie, Berlin; Fondazione Sandretto, Turin, MMK Museum fur Modern Kunst, Frankfurt am Main; Lenbachhaus, Munich, and the Saatchi Collection, London. She is represented by Kadel Willborn Gallery in Düsseldorf and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto.

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Shannon Bool - Michelangelo’s Place


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