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Mike Nelson begins work on his upcoming exhibition at the CAG

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Mike Nelson begins work on his upcoming exhibition at the CAG

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British artist Mike Nelson arrived in Vancouver last Friday to begin work on his upcoming exhibition at the CAG for which he will present two new works.

With just over a month to the opening Mike is getting right to the task of collecting beach debris off local and regional shores, to build what will be his first solo exhibition in Canada. On Monday he started combing the beaches along the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal and Iona Beach in Richmond.

Here are a few images from his first day’s search and findings!

Posted by Michaela Rife. Photos by Derek Brunnen.

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The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first solo exhibition in Canada of work by the renowned British artist Mike Nelson. Comprising two significant new commissions, the exhibition includes an ambitious series of sculptures produced in partnership with The Power Plant in Toronto, and a new photographic work made in association with the Walter Phillips Gallery in Banff, its starting point family photographs taken between 1957 and 1972 by the distinguished Canadian
anthropologist Dr. Wilson Duff.

Nelson is best-known for his labyrinthine architectural installations that unfold as narrative structures, where the viewer moves through rooms like a reader turns pages in a novel. These immersive environments are often seemingly abandoned, devoid of figures, yet imagining the unseen occupants of these intricate spaces is central to the viewer’s experience. For I, IMPOSTOR, Nelson’s major work for the 54th Venice Biennale (2011), much of the elaborate space appeared vacated, with the exception of a small room where lines of drying black and white photographs hung from wires that crisscrossed the ceiling. These images documented a seventeenth century caravanserai, photographed within the very building that housed a previous installation by Nelson during the 2003 Istanbul Biennale. The darkrooms within the Venice piece were a reconstruction of those adapted ‘found’ spaces in the Eminönü district of Istanbul, the architecture within the British Pavilion a disjointed facsimile from memory and from the photographs of the caravanserai. Visualizing this ghostly photographer supposedly moving through the same space as the viewer, simultaneously suggested the architecture as narrative, but confused time and space; a shift of cities and decades shadowing personal and world histories. It presented a fractured and multi-layered narrative, a set of atmospheres that similarly inform Nelson’s discrete sculptural works.

While his cultural references are broad, touching on particular moments in science-fiction, literature and the Beat era, much of Nelson’s work can be linked through an archetypal figure of the lone wanderer. For the Contemporary Art Gallery, Nelson revisits ideas and forms first seen in The Amnesiacs, a serial project begun in 1996, which references a narrative involving an imaginary cast of characters — a group of ‘outsiders’ to the mainstream who uncannily resemble a disembodied late twentieth century biker gang, albeit without bikes. These quintessential outlaws of myth and literature, as depicted in the popular imagination of North America, are paralleled here with another favourite genre; that of the hunter or fur trader, exploring both groups’ economic underpinning of these romantic façades, and the resulting conflicts involved in the expansion of territory.

In this new work it is as if a beachcomber has gathered material from the ocean, imagined by Nelson as a gigantic intelligent entity, much like that of Lem’s planet ‘Solaris’, sifting the debris as a means to uncover truths about contemporary culture and our place within it. The roving characters, The Amnesiacs, have come together as interpreters, deciphering the collected material by creating assemblages akin to some form of disjointed memory or flashback, that when brought together may effect communication or reveal hidden meaning, the potential for a new and unified system of understanding. Nelson originally developed these thoughts after the unexpected death of his friend and collaborator, Erlend Williamson. In 1996 he had fallen to his death whilst climbing in the Scottish Highlands, at the time that Nelson was working on his first incarnation of what would become The Amnesiacs. Williamson, an artist and mountaineer whose family ancestry was of Orcadian descent, will contribute again; this time parts of his own narrative, and the very materials that surrounded him — those that remain present in his absence — will be woven into the fabric of the work.

Each of the new works is derived from the Canadian landscape: one is quite literally built with flotsam and jetsam collected off local shores, while the other re-imagines it. The second new piece is a sequence of projected 35mm slides produced during recent road trips across British Columbia and into Alberta, images that appear out of time. Collectively they trace another movement across the landscape as well as capture momentary pauses, underlining human interventions to the land. Nelson’s interest in the photographic depiction of the Canadian landscape came through seeing a series of slides from Dr. Wilson Duff’s family trips across the province, presented at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver. As an anthropologist Duff was dedicated to understanding North West Coast cultures, even such private holidays were spent viewing aboriginal festivals or visiting the workshops of totem pole carvers. These images resonated with Nelson as much as the objects in the museum, as a language to be unraveled. They were of a time and place, but already displaced. In relation to this, Nelson has made a work that talks about the land itself and the artistic traditions inherent within it, especially those borne out of North America in the twentieth century and their re-translation as part of a British oeuvre. Nelson unearths the possible re-reading of such activities as cultural imperialism within both strands of the movement — an accusation that could ultimately be reflected within the activities of the artist himself.

Mike Nelson is represented by 303 Gallery, New York; Galleria Franco Noero, Turin; Matt’s Gallery, London; and neugerriemschneider, Berlin.

We acknowledge the generous support of Rick Erickson and Donna Partridge, Jane Irwin and Ross Hill, and Randy and Julia Heward.

With thanks to the Erlend Williamson Art Foundation.

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Mike Nelson


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Jem Noble’s practice encompasses digital image-making, sound, sculpture, performance and text and is concerned with questions of framing, indeterminacy and co-production. Among recent projects he has given a performance-lecture for the European Arts Research Network at dOCUMENTA (13); created image, text and audio work in conjunction with Bruce Nauman’s Days at the ICA, London; made structural edits of 1988 feature films Ghosts of the Civil Dead and They Live, screened at Arnolfini, Bristol, UK and The Engine Room, Wellington, New Zealand; and painstakingly recorded music from the internet in real-time over three months to DJ at Manifesta 7 in Trentino in collaboration with Swedish anti-copyright activists Piratbyrån. He has also undertaken several commissioned collaborations with Turner Prize 2012 winner, Elizabeth Price, producing sound and music for her large-scale video installations. Noble is founding member of the Blackout Arts expanded-cinema collective (2002–2010) and was co-director of Venn Festival of new and exploratory music and sound between 2004 and 2008.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Jem Noble


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Krisztina Laszlo holds a cross-appointment at the University of British Columbia as the archivist for the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery and the Museum of Anthropology. Her research interests include artist’s archives, curatorial and artistic interpretations of the archive, cultural property and preservation of media art. She received a Master of Archival Studies from the University of British Columbia and also holds a Certificate in Public History and a Bachelor of General Studies from Simon Fraser University. Laszlo will discuss a series of slides produced by archeologist and anthropologist Wilson Duff now held in the MOA collection referenced by Mike Nelson in his new commission Eighty Circles through Canada (The Last Possessions of an Orcadian Mountain Man), 2013. Commissioned in partnership with Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff Centre.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Krisztina Laszlo


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Related Learning

Artist Mike Nelson discusses his practice and his exhibition and two new commissions at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Video by Derek Brunen with installation photography by Scott Massey.

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Video | Mike Nelson


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In CAG Shop

$45.00

Published:
108 pages

This artist bookwork is published on the occasion of the exhibition space that saw (platform for a performance in two parts) by Mike Nelson, a site-specific installation at a former cabaret theatre and dining hall located at Gartenstrasse 6 in the district Berlin-Mitte, which opened in 1905 and closed in 1934.

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Mike Nelson - space that saw (platform for a performance in two parts)


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In CAG Shop

$50.00

Published:
146 pages

This rare now 'out of print' publication was published on the occasion of the exhibition MIKE NELSON : I, IMPOSTOR, created for the British Pavilion at the 54th International Art Exhibition - la Biennale di Venecia, and includes an essay by Dan Cameron. Book concept by Mike Nelson and design by Secondary Modern.

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Mike Nelson - British Pavilion


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