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Youth programs

Montreal-based, Kanien’keha:ka artist Skawennati joins us for the first phase of her Field House Residency.

In collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology, Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the Initiative for Indigenous Futures (IIF), a branch of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), she will be leading an intensive workshop called Skins participating in MOA’s Native Youth Program.

Skins will involve six Indigenous youth currently participating in the Native Youth Program, part of an ongoing relationship between CAG and MOA. Hosted at ECUAD, the workshop will begin with an exploration of storytelling as oral tradition folding into how stories can be told in new ways through ‘machinima’ (a portmanteau of “machine” and “cinema”). Using Second Life, an online virtual environment, participants will learn script development and storyboarding, avatar/character creation, virtual set design, filming and editing in a virtual world.  Skins aims to expand Indigenous presence online, provide new design skills and impart understanding of narrative structures while also questioning notions of identity and stereotype. The Skins workshop aims to empower Indigenous youth to use new technologies to tell their stories.

She will also begin work toward a new commission to be realized in 2017.

Skawennati is known for her pioneering new media projects that address history, the future and change. They include the on-line gallery/chat-space and mixed-reality event CyberPowWow (1997–2004); a paper doll/ time-travel journal Imagining Indians in the 25th Century (2001); and TimeTraveller™ (2008–2013), a multi-platform project featuring nine machinima episodes. Born in Kahnawake Mohawk Territory, Skawennati is Co-Director with Jason E. Lewis of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), a research network of artists, academics and technologists investigating, creating and critiquing indigenous virtual environments. This year, AbTeC launched IIF, the Initiative for Indigenous Futures.

This project was made possible through the support of the BC Arts Council’s Youth Engagement grant.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver, along with many private and individual donors. For 2016–2019 we acknowledge the generous support for the Field House Studio Residency Program by the Vancouver Foundation.

For further details about the program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and follow the blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.wordpress.com

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Skawennati


Telus Garden Building
Fourth Floor, 510 West Georgia St.
Open Monday to Friday, 8am – 4pm

Commissioned by TELUS, Re-Visions is a new permanent, site-specific five-channel media installation developed by eight local emerging artists facilitated by the CAG and Cineworks. Mentored by Jem Noble, Brian Lye and Josh Hite, Re-Visions seeks to produce new representations of place through the group’s diverse responses to our city in motion. The installation engages with themes of temporal and spatial transformation, the landscape of Vancouver portrayed through constant, yet fluctuating changes in infrastructure, community and communications. Playing with the idea of a contemporary “city symphony” — an experimental documentary genre that mimics city rhythms in an attempt to create a portrait of everyday city life — the installation turns to repetition and abstraction, rather than literal representation.

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Off-site: Re-Visions - Telus Garden Building


Are you a teacher seeking to develop work with your class based on our exhibitions? Or are you planning a field trip and would like further guidance?

The CAG offers engaging arts learning for students from K-12.  Our school programs involve an interactive guided tour of gallery exhibitions and the option of thematically connected art making. Rooted in enquiry and discussion our education programs invite students and teachers to creatively explore visual art materials and processes as well as critically reflect upon the power of contemporary art to engage diverse themes, perspectives and complex ideas.

Our school programs are designed to meet the areas of learning identified in the BC Education Ministry’s Arts Education curriculum.

Program Options:

Guided Program

1 hr. – $50.00 (maximum 30 students)

The guided program for students from K-12 involves an insightful, inquiry-based exploration of the exhibitions allowing for creative learning and developing key transferable skills such as problem solving, communication and literacy.

Guided Program + Art Making activity  

2 hrs. – $90 (maximum 30 students)

For the guided program combined with art making activities in response to our exhibitions for students from K-12, in-depth tours of current exhibitions combine with workshops investigating the techniques, medium and practices of the work on display. These workshops enable meaningful dialogue to emerge developing critical thinking, making and understanding.

Considering spending a full day with your class in downtown Vancouver? We are in close proximity to a range of other cultural organizations that also offer school programming.

For more information or to book a program for your class, please email: learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca or telephone 604 681 2700.

To apply for funding to support your visit to the CAG, please visit daytrippers.ca

Exhibitions for 2016/2017
The CAG exhibits national and international artists that work with a diverse range of media, processes, and practices offering an important opportunity to engage with current ideas and issues.

Isabel Nolan: The weakened eye of day
July 29 – October 2, 2016

Isabel Nolan’s exhibition is an unfolding story of light as a central metaphor for truth and optimism. This exploration of our place beneath the sun includes text works, sculpture, ceramics, drawings, paintings and photographs.

Guillaume Leblon: UNTANGLED FIGURES
October 14, 2016 – January 1, 2017

New York-based French artist, Guillaume Leblon creates fictional spaces through sculptures made with familiar everyday objects. A figurative presence is suggested through imprints, clothing and other remnants.

Haroon Mirza
January 13 – March 19, 2017

U.K artist Haroon Mirza makes immersive kinetic installations that deal with the distinctions between noise, sound and music. For CAG plant forms and solar panels are used to explore the interplay and friction between sound and light waves and electric current.

Capture Photography Festival
March 31 – June 18, 2017

We will curate a group exhibition as the feature show for The Capture Photography Festival including local to international artists, more details to come.

 

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School Programs


On the last Saturday of each month, CAG invites all ages to drop-in for short family friendly exhibition tours and free art making activities that respond to our current exhibitions. Activities differ in response to the specifics of work on display but always involve hands-on creative activity with a range of materials and processes. These activities are designed to engage, challenge and inspire young, enquiring minds in ways that are imaginative and fun.

Upcoming CAG Family Days:

Saturday, October 29
Dreamscapes
Responding to Guillaume Leblon’s exhibition create a dreamscape collage from various materials and fragments.

Saturday, November 26
Body Language
Inspired by the Guillaume Leblon’s installation, create a series of plasticine sculptures using molds based on clothing and the body. This initiative is presented in collaboration with ArtStarts on Saturdays.

We acknowledge the generous support of the Peter Szeto Investment Group for our Family Day program.
Presented in collaboration with ArtStarts on Saturdays. For more details visit: www.artstarts.com/weekend

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Family Day Program


<h2><strong>Youth Programs</strong></h2>

CAG programming for young people involves a series of differing projects annually. They provide stimulating and challenging experiences for young artists committed to experimentation and pushing the boundaries of their own art making in a supportive studio environment.

Through these projects, youth have the opportunity to work with leading artists, curators and educators in Vancouver as they explore a range of contemporary art practices and exhibition making alongside production of work such as context-specific installation, large-scale collaborative sculptures and performances. Participants engage in critiques and discussions concerning idea development, working with materials and processes, and viewing works of art.

<h2>Previous youth projects include:</h2>

  • A Summer Intensive with artists Brendan Fernandes, Justine Chambers, Daelik and Delia Brett that had young artists exploring the intersection between dance, choreography and visual art, culminating in an ambitious collaborative performance.
  • City in Motion was a four month lens-based youth project offered in collaboration with Cineworks. Artists Josh Hite and Brian Lye mentored young participants to create a permanent, multi-media commission for the TELUS Garden building using smart phones, social media and surveillance recordings.
  • The Exchange visual art intensive was conceived by designer Lisa Novak and facilitated by artists, Keg de Souza and Walter K. Scott. Working in studios at Emily Carr University of Art + Design, participants took up the creative problem of working in collaboration to create an installation that considered the unique site and context of Granville Island.

Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street
Open call: Visual Art Summer Intensive

Arts Umbrella, Contemporary Art Gallery and SFU collaboration
August 8 to 26, 2016

Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street is a three week visual arts intensive specifically designed for youth between the age of 14 and 19 interested in developing their visual art practice.

The program will culminate in a one-day exhibition at CAG.

Application deadline: Monday, June 6, 2016.

Space is limited. Fee for the intensive is $480.00. Application forms are available at www.artsumbrella.com/vasi

For more information about the program, please contact:

Holly Schmidt, at h.schmidt@contemporaryartgallery.ca

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Youth Programs


‘Thowxeya’ was created as part of the ‘Skins’ workshop. In collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology, Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the Initiative for Indigenous Futures (IIF), a branch of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), Skawennati led an intensive workshop called ‘Skins’ participating in MOA’s Native Youth Program. Supported by the British Columbia Arts Council Youth Engagement program.

‘Skins’ involved six Indigenous youth currently participating in the Native Youth Program, part of an ongoing relationship between CAG and MOA. Hosted at ECUAD, the workshop began with an exploration of storytelling as oral tradition folding into how stories can be told in new ways through ‘machinima’ (a portmanteau of “machine” and “cinema”).

Calvin Charlie-Dawson – Squamish, Stó:lō, Kwakwaka’wakw
Dusty Carpenter – Heiltsuk
Latisha Wadhams – Kwakwaka’wakw
Karoleena Medina – Heiltsuk
Jennifer Pahl – Tsimshian, Nisga’a , Gitxsan
Isaiah Wadhams – Squamish, Stó:lō, Kwakwaka’wakw

Montreal based, Kanien’keha:ka artist Skawennati’s project with CAG, ‘machinima’ workshops that use new technologies, virtual environments and video games to empower Indigenous youth to tell stories in a new way.

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Video | Thowxeya - Skins workshop


‘The Madam’, was created as part of the ‘Skins’ workshop. In collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology, Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the Initiative for Indigenous Futures (IIF), a branch of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), Skawennati led an intensive workshop called ‘Skins’ participating in MOA’s Native Youth Program. Supported by the British Columbia Arts Council Youth Engagement program.

‘Skins’ involved six Indigenous youth currently participating in the Native Youth Program, part of an ongoing relationship between CAG and MOA. Hosted at ECUAD, the workshop began with an exploration of storytelling as oral tradition folding into how stories can be told in new ways through ‘machinima’ (a portmanteau of “machine” and “cinema”).

Calvin Charlie-Dawson – Squamish, Stó:lō, Kwakwaka’wakw
Dusty Carpenter – Heiltsuk
Latisha Wadhams – Kwakwaka’wakw
Karoleena Medina – Heiltsuk
Jennifer Pahl – Tsimshian, Nisga’a , Gitxsan
Isaiah Wadhams – Squamish, Stó:lō, Kwakwaka’wakw

Montreal based, Kanien’keha:ka artist Skawennati’s project with CAG, ‘machinima’ workshops that use new technologies, virtual environments and video games to empower Indigenous youth to tell stories in a new way.

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Video | The Madam - Skins workshop


Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street
Open call: Visual Art Summer Youth Intensive
Arts Umbrella, Contemporary Art Gallery and SFU collaboration
August 8 to 26, 2016

Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street is a three week visual arts intensive speci cally designed for youth between the age of 14 and 19 interested in developing their visual art practice.

It will provide a stimulating and challenging experience for young artists committed to experimentation and pushing the boundaries of their own art making in a supportive studio environment.

Youth will have the opportunity to work with leading artists, curators and educators in Vancouver as they explore and produce a range of contemporary art practices such as the context-speci c installation, large-scale collaborative sculptures and exhibition making. Participants will engage in critiques and discussions about developing ideas, working with materials and viewing works of art.

The program will culminate in a one-day exhibition at CAG.

Application Deadline: Monday, June 6, 2016 for accepting applications. Space is limited, please apply soon. The fee for the intensive is $480.00.

Application forms are available at http://www.artsumbrella.com/vasi

For more information about the program, please contact: Holly Schmidt, Assistant Curator at h.schmidt@ contemporaryartgallery.ca

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Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street Open call: Visual Art Summer Youth Intensive


Re-visions
Bo Ha, Chris Mills, Diego Romero, Elizabeth Ellis, Megan Low, Natalie Murao, Robert Psutka, Sophia Wolfe

Re-visions brought together eight emerging artists from diverse backgrounds in visual, performing and literary arts. Unique perspectives combined into a larger collaborative multi-screen piece, the shared objective being to highlight the dynamism inherent in the processes of rapid (re)building as Vancouver evolves, remembering a recent past while gesturing towards an imagined future.

Read on for a report by emerging artist and Re-visions participant Elizabeth Ellis:

“In November 2014, a group of artists met at the CAG to begin an intensive learning program to produce a new media installation for TELUS Garden with the guidance of mentors Josh Hite, Brian Lye, and Jem Noble.

We spent a couple of months researching through studio and gallery visits, workshops, and artist talks. After generating some ideas, we set out as a group and began experimenting with different documentation tactics throughout the city. We walked through urban spaces and improvised along the way. We tried same-space shooting, giving each other instructions, and exploring methods rooted in psychogeography. We continually revised our ideas but were overwhelmed with the amount that we had, as a group of eight. It felt like there were unlimited directions to pursue.

We also had lectures given by artists in the city and during a final talk at the CAG, artist Laiwan reminded us to deeply listen: to be in-tune with the phenomena that’s personally interesting, and to expand our visual and emotional vocabulary—linking metaphors and creating language. This advice motivated the group to share what we were each invested in. Artists with dance and performance backgrounds approached the project focusing on movement, through the choreography of the camera body and the collection of images. Others considered integrating city archives and found footage, while some explored concepts around urban space and telecommunications. The challenge then became how to weave seemingly disparate ideas together into a collective piece. How did we experience the city space as individuals and yet also as a collective?

As we looked through each contribution in the editing stage, patterns emerged and a new language started to collectively form. We realized that what we initially thought were disconnected ideas actually echoed our diverse experiences of the city. Our process and works entangled with one another, and for me, this was one of the most rewarding aspects about the collaboration.

Thanks to our mentors, Cineworks, and the Contemporary Art Gallery for your generosity of time, dialogue, and support throughout this valuable learning opportunity.”

—Elizabeth Ellis

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Re-Visions: Improvisation & Collaboration - Telus Garden Building Project


Re-Visions: Improvisation & Collaboration
In November 2014, a group of artists met at the CAG to begin an intensive learning program to produce a new media installation for TELUS Garden with the guidance of mentors Josh Hite, Brian Lye, and Jem Noble.

Megan Low, one of the participating artists writes on the production process, transformation and endlessness….

I’ve been thinking a lot about endings, especially since this project is now complete. It feels bittersweet that after the many months spent meeting, discussing, and hovering over computer screens, the thing exists beyond the seed of an idea.

I’ve also been returning to what artist Laiwan Laiwanette said to us in a talk about extending the life of a project through different mediums, and about documenting the process as part of the work itself.

Now that I can reflect on it, I sense that the work exists in written ideas and individual interpretation as much as it does on screen. There are moments in it that linger and make you question the reality you think you know, and moments left on the cutting room floor that are as much a part of the piece as what remains. It almost seems fit that, for a project exploring spatial transformations in relation to time, the work has undergone prolonged visions and re-visions.

Although there is a self-congratulatory satisfaction in having laboured over something that has finally made its way out into the world and being able to actually see it, what has been more satisfying has been the process itself. Connecting as a group—learning, doing, failing, and succeeding together—has been an invaluable experience, as has being afforded expert mentorship and guidance. I’m almost certain that I speak for everyone involved in saying that this opportunity has been transformative beyond measure in terms of skills and personal growth gained.

I picture the steady stream of people walking by or stopping to watch our piece as it loops continuously throughout the workday, and I can’t help but be poetic as I think of the city just outside continuously changing. I still wonder about endings…

– Megan Low

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Transformative experience and mentorship – on the Telus Garden Project by Megan Low


This is the second installment in a series of three parts of a Q&A that Patrick O’Neill conducted with Jeremy Shaw. Part 1 can be found here.

Patrick O’Neill: The soundtrack seems to occupy a pivotal role in both films in this exhibition. To what extent has your artistic practice been informed by your experiences with Circlesquare and vice versa?

Jeremy Shaw: As far as my skill sets go, [sound design] has been a massive influence.  I spent countless hours/days/months working on Circlesquare music – experimenting with production, writing and recording, learning programs, samplers, instruments, etc.  All of this is all very useful in technical ways with how I am working now.  I used to really try and keep these two practices separate, but since disbanding Circlesquare I’ve felt a real freedom to use music in a much more present way in my art works. I brainstorm in both a visual and musical way – rarely do I think of one without the other.

PO: You seem to be quite conscious of the power of technology to inscribe or convey belief structures to the viewers or users of those technologies. Is this idea simply of personal interest, or is it something you try to explicitly acknowledge in your works?

JS: It’s a device I use as a way to lure a viewer into something via an assumed awareness.  Their personal understanding of/relationship to the technology puts them somewhat at my disposal to subvert that familiarity; to propose something new via this comfort.  It is definitely acknowledged in the works – for example, in Variation FQ, the first 3 minutes are mono sound and the antiquated 16mm image authentically mimics a 1960’s aesthetic.  If one was not to know of contemporary voguing, they could believe this was an archival work.  But at 3 minutes in when Leiomy takes her hair out, the audio switches dramatically to surround sound and an MP3 quality digital sound is introduced while she shakes her head in a way that would be difficult to believe was shot anytime before the late 1980’s.  So here the projector and media and music all come into question as no longer endorsing the initial set-up.  I like the idea of collapsing time this way.

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UBC Intern Patrick O’Neill in conversation with Jeremy Shaw | Part 2 of 3


Hello all! My name is Jas Lally and for the next 10 months I will be working as the Programs Assistant. I am excited to work with Shaun Dacey, Curator of Learning and Public Programs, the staff and volunteers at the CAG. I have been working and volunteering in the arts for the past few years and some of you may have seen me at the Vancouver Art Gallery and Access. I worked a the Vancouver Art Gallery for 5 years in Visitor Services and Administration where  I was able to meet local and international artists. At Access, where I first met  and worked  with Shaun, I was able to work  one-on-one with the Director/Curator and artists. I really enjoyed this more intimate level of work.

My experiences at both galleries solidified my choice in pursing my Masters in the History of Art which I recently completed  at the University of Birmingham, UK. I studied at the Barber Institute of Fine Art  where I co-curated an exhibition on portraiture with the Barber and the National Portrait Gallery. I also completed my dissertation on exhibition practices where I examined why textiles change meaning when exhibited. I was able to use  Lady Barber’s lace collection as my case study. My time at the Barber gave me perspective  and hands on experiences into the multidisciplinary world of curatorial.

My first introduction to the CAG came only three days after starting when I helped set up and greet guests at the CAG’s annual Art Auction. The auction went really well and it was such an exciting way to start a new job! My new role will allow me to help coordinate some interesting learning programs. For example, we recently launched the Telus Garden project, The City in Motion, where 11 young emerging artists are creating an original film to be permanently installed at the new Telus building. Look out for my blog on this project where you can follow along on the progress. I have also started to work with the artist in residence at the Burrard Marina Field House. The CAG recently hosted Fluid Frames: Filmmakers Series with Ben Russell. We hosted a film social at the Field House.

Look back to the CAG’s Blog for exciting updates about what I’m getting up to!

PS: if you haven’t already seen When Sky was Sea by Shimabuku drop by and say hello and sign up to attend one of the talks on the exhibition!

PSS: Did you  hear about our exciting new project in partnership with Ballet BC? and in association with the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative and commissioning artists John Wood and Paul Harrison? to find out more click here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

See you at the CAG soon! – Jas Lally

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Hello from Jas Lally – New Programs Assistant at the CAG


Hello!

My name is Sally, I’m a temporary addition here, volunteering at the CAG, and with my time here hurrying by I wanted to fill you in on how I got here and all the cool stuff I’ve been doing at the CAG.

I’m from the UK and have come to Vancouver for six weeks as part of a four month adventure that has been the most memorable of my life.

My time here is part of a plan that involved leaving all the sensible things in my life, like a job and a flat so that I could stretch my legs over to the West Coast …or I should say, the ‘Best Coast.’

Things took shape after I sent some emails, one to Anchorage Museum in Alaska and the other to the CAG. I have been involved in arts and museum education since University, volunteering or working for different organizations and so I thought it would be brilliant to gain some experience overseas. The reply emails were nerve racking to open but I received, to my delight, welcoming replies. So it was decided and before I knew it I was Alaska bound, looking at the glaciers below wondering what the next four months would bring.

I spent seven weeks in Anchorage, with six of those as a volunteer at the museum getting to develop informal learning activities and facilitate family events. The photo below was taken on my phone in Sitka, onboard a little boat as I looked out for and encountered humpback whales. For me it captures how I feel about my time in Alaska.

After Anchorage I spent a couple of weeks exploring South East Alaska, Seattle and San Francisco before arriving here! My time in Vancouver keeps getting better. At the CAG I have been helping Shaun Dacey and Jas Lally with exciting projects that are teaching me loads. I have been developing learning resources for teachers to accompany the current exhibition, Shimabuku, When Sky Was Sea, helping with the CAGs first Teachers Social as well as the monthly Free Family Day   (I am now an Octopus expert… ask me anything!). I have also had the opportunity to get to know the talented team selected for The City in Motion – CAG/TELUS Garden Public Art project, I’ll have to come back to see the final installation!

I have been supported and welcomed by the CAG team, they have made sure that I eat at yummy places, find the best coffee and of course see loads of exciting art. And so I can’t say thank you enough, I’m sure my last week here will be a brilliant conclusion.

– Sally Page

P.S. Whatever you do! don’t miss the CAG and Ballet BC new partnership, a new dance+art commission with amazing UK artists John Wood and Paul Harrison. To read more click here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

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Hello from Sally! – From Anchorage to the Salish Coast


Over the course of ten weeks, the Contemporary Art Gallery brought together eleven emerging artists: Anne Riley, Charlotte Newman, Hannah Axen, Kelly McInnes, Kristina Jaggard, Lexi Vajda, Maia Nichols, Matilda Cobanli, Natalie Tin Yin Gan, Ryan Genoe, Sophia Wolfe to explore the intersection between dance, choreography and visual art in our inaugural Summer Intensive. Working with mentors: Justine Chambers, Delia Brett, Daelik and Burrard Marina Field House Studio resident Brendan Fernandes the group participated in studio visits, gallery tours, performance workshops and seminars throughout the summer. This culminated in the production of a one evening installation/durational performance work titled 600 Campbell, at the Russian Hall on September 10.

Considering the absence and presence of objects and bodies, the group developed a series of performances and installations examining ways in which each piece intersects with another, connecting the work, the audience and the space. The artists collaborate to presented the viewer with an invitation for interaction, allowing them to influence the work and the space both as observers and active contributors. The evening was a huge success with well over a hundred people stopping by throughout the night participating in the various performances ranging from audio works and overhead projector performance to a durational chair performance in the main auditorium. Check out the pics!

We are working on a video of the evening we will be posting soon!

We acknowledge the generous support of the British Columbia Arts Council Council Youth Engagement Program.

-Shaun Dacey

 

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600 Campbell: Summer Youth Intensive Finale


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