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Residencies

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes the Feminist Land Art Retreat (FLAR) for a summer residency. FLAR was born in 2010 with a rock-concert style poster depicting mirrored images of Robert Smithson’s
Spiral Jetty, FLAR transformed this seminal work of land art into something resembling fallopian tubes, while inviting the viewer to a fantasy event. This began FLAR’s conceptual and humorous
subversion of familiar visual forms, including fashion, spa advertising, commemorative architecture, and aerial imagery. FLAR has continued appropriating commercial and art-historical
images with irony, challenging commonly held notions of how feminism is embodied and expressed.

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Residency | Feminist Land Art Retreat


Sikarnt Skoolisariyaporn
July 31 to September 3, 2017

Produced in partnership with the Contemporary Art Gallery, Access Gallery and Burrard Arts Foundation, Sikarnt Skoolisariyaporn, currently based between Bangkok and Düsseldorf, is the eighth and final artist to participate in Twenty-Three Days at Sea, the travelling artist residency originated by Access.

Through moving image, performance, text and installation, Skoolisariyaporn’s practice embraces perpetual complexity of space and time. She is interested in contingency of the seascape, a landscape which only reveals itself in the fourth dimension of time, in its constant shifting through wave and wind. The seascape not only suggests an alternative approach to our perception of spatiality, but to the way our formless reality operates. There is perhaps no image that better describes our neoliberal present than a mass of alienated consumer products–at once material and monetary–floating precariously in the middle of the sea. Skoolisariyaporn imagines that as sea levels rise with climate change, the ground of modern reason “floods,” and a new “superstitious liquid state” pours in to take its place.

Following her time aboard a container ship to Shanghai in Twenty-Three Days at Sea, Skoolisariyaporn will take up residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio, and through a number of programmed events, will explore the state of flux of the sea and transnational mode of production in relation to ‘Cargo Cult’, a cultural phenomenon practiced by indigenous peoples in Melanesia in the wake of their contact with the colonialist West. The work will be presented in an exhibition at Access Gallery opening September 8, 2017.

Sikarnt Skoolisariyaporn’s practice involves moving image, performance, text, and installation, and examines notions of human and non-human history embedded in geological spacetime: the history of mankind as remembered by the earth and its landscape. She is particularly interested in the landscape of the sea, because a “seascape” offers the potential to imagine a perpetual landscape that transcends the concept of “space” into “time.” In this way, she suggests, the landscape of the sea suggests a new way to understand and approach history and spatiality. Recent exhibitions and performances include Chongqing Changjiang Contemporary Museum, Chongqing, China; Biquini Wax, Mexico City; Deptford Lounge, London, UK; Kunstakademie Dusseldorf; Gruentaler 9, Berlin; and Five Years Project, London, UK. Skoolisariyaporn lives and works in London and Bangkok.

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Residency | Burrard Marina Field House Studio | Sikarnt Skoolisariyaporn


Derya Akay
Manti, Börek, Baklava
Burrard Marina Field House Residency
Until April 2017

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes Vancouver-based artist Derya Akay as the Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence this spring.

Akay is collaborating with women elders from a range of cultural backgrounds to explore and share local and diasporic culinary traditions. This convivial preparing and partaking of food is a gateway to oral history, which Akay understands as both storytelling and the sensations and memories summoned through communal eating.

“For my residency, I have developed the project working with five elder women who will work with me to give workshops to ten to fifteen people, as a social exercise that revolves around food, time and the labour of kitchen” – Derya Akay

Over the course of March, April and May, Derya Akay will co-host a series of workshops and meals where the public is invited to gather for cooking and conversation with the women elders.

Image: Derya Akay and women elders cook at the Burrard Marina Field House. Photograph Michelle Martin.

Upcoming events:

Saturday, March 18, 12-3pm, free
Cooking with Maria Dyulgerova and her granddaughter Biliana Velkova

AT: Burrard Marina Field House, 1655 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver.
Tickets and information (currently a wait list)

Sunday, April 2, 5-8pm, $40 includes full meal and workshop.
Shabbat Dinner and Fresh Challah presented in partnership with The Jewish Museum and Archives of BC. 

Dinner will be prepared by artist Derya Akay, Sara Ciacci, Leonor Etkin, Claire Hammer and Debbie Kafka.
AT: The Jewish Museum and Archives of BC, 6184 Ash Street (2nd floor), Vancouver.
Tickets and information

More events to be announced in April and May, please check www.contemporaryartgallery.ca for details.

Derya Akay (b, 1988, Turkey) is an artist living in Vancouver.  He received the 2016 Portfolio Prize Emerging Artist Award in Vancouver. Recent solo exhibitions include with bread, Campbell River Art Gallery, 2017; Pumice, Del Vaz Projects, Los Angeles, California, 2017; Painting with Light, Kunstverein Toronto, 2015; Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Supper, Centre A, Vancouver, 2014. Group exhibitions include Aga Khan Museum, Toronto, 2017; Unit 17, Vancouver, 2017; Ambivalent Pleasures, Vancouver Art Gallery, 2016; The Gardener Museum, Toronto, 2015; Geometry of Knowing Part I, Simon Fraser University Gallery, Burnaby, 2015.

About the Burrard Marina Field House
Throughout 2017 CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each working toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2017–2019. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by CAG. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter, participate and connect with art and artists.

The Burrard Marina Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver, along with many private and individual donors. Please visit our website for a full list of supporters. For further details about the program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca
and the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.blog

For 2016–2019 we acknowledge the generous support of the Burrard Marina Field House Studio Residency Program by the Vancouver Foundation.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Derya Akay: Mantı, Börek, Baklava


Diane Borsato
The Moon Is Often Referred To As A Dead, Barren World, But I Think This Is Not Necessarily The Case
Saturday, March 25, 6-9pm
B.C. Binning Gallery

With the collaboration of Judie Glick, Kuniko Yamamoto, Naomi Sawada and Anne Morrell Robinson.

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a unique one-night installation by Toronto-based artist Diane Borsato. Evolving from a research visit to Vancouver in summer 2016 as part of our Burrard Marina Field House Studio Residency Program, Borsato will work with members of the Japanese flower arranging (Ikebana) community in Vancouver to develop The Moon Is Often Referred To As a Dead, Barren World, But I Think This Is Not Necessarily The Case.

Typical of her practice, Borsato often works with amateur organisations – mycologists, astronomers, beekeepers – in projects that examine social and sensorial modes of knowing. She has been practising and researching Sogetsu Ikebana for several years.

Taking its title from a statement made by the modern sculptor and Sogetsu founder Teshigahara Sofu in Kadensho: Book of Flowers the work echoes ideas found in the publication in which he imagines making arrangements in another, very different world. For the project, Borsato invites several Ikebana masters from the modern Sogetsu school to participate in a collaborative workshop and installation. The practitioners will work with seasonal materials, and objects, supplies and the space of the gallery building itself to provide a conceptual framework for materialising a dialogue between the worlds of Ikebana – often a highly technical, rule-based traditional cultural practice and contemporary art – with its own unmistakable tropes and cultural specificities.

The project is generously supported by The Vancouver Foundation.

Diane Borsato has established an international reputation for her social and interventionist practices, performance, video, photography, and sculpture. She was twice nominated for the Sobey Art Award and was winner of the Victor Martyn-Lynch Staunton Award for her work in the Inter-Arts category from the Canada Council for the Arts. She has exhibited and performed at major Canadian institutions including the Art Gallery of Ontario, The Power Plant, the Art Gallery of York University, MOCCA (Toronto), the Vancouver Art Gallery, the National Art Centre (Ottawa), and in galleries and museums in the US, France, Mexico, Taiwan and Japan.

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Diane Borsato - The Moon Is Often Referred To As A Dead, Barren World, But I Think This Is Not Necessarily The Case


Montreal-based, Kanien’keha:ka artist Skawennati joins us for the first phase of her Field House Residency.

In collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology, Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the Initiative for Indigenous Futures (IIF), a branch of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), she will be leading an intensive workshop called Skins participating in MOA’s Native Youth Program.

Skins will involve six Indigenous youth currently participating in the Native Youth Program, part of an ongoing relationship between CAG and MOA. Hosted at ECUAD, the workshop will begin with an exploration of storytelling as oral tradition folding into how stories can be told in new ways through ‘machinima’ (a portmanteau of “machine” and “cinema”). Using Second Life, an online virtual environment, participants will learn script development and storyboarding, avatar/character creation, virtual set design, filming and editing in a virtual world.  Skins aims to expand Indigenous presence online, provide new design skills and impart understanding of narrative structures while also questioning notions of identity and stereotype. The Skins workshop aims to empower Indigenous youth to use new technologies to tell their stories.

She will also begin work toward a new commission to be realized in 2017.

Skawennati is known for her pioneering new media projects that address history, the future and change. They include the on-line gallery/chat-space and mixed-reality event CyberPowWow (1997–2004); a paper doll/ time-travel journal Imagining Indians in the 25th Century (2001); and TimeTraveller™ (2008–2013), a multi-platform project featuring nine machinima episodes. Born in Kahnawake Mohawk Territory, Skawennati is Co-Director with Jason E. Lewis of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), a research network of artists, academics and technologists investigating, creating and critiquing indigenous virtual environments. This year, AbTeC launched IIF, the Initiative for Indigenous Futures.

This project was made possible through the support of the BC Arts Council’s Youth Engagement grant.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver, along with many private and individual donors. For 2016–2019 we acknowledge the generous support for the Field House Studio Residency Program by the Vancouver Foundation.

For further details about the program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and follow the blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.wordpress.com

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Skawennati


Amaara Raheem
May 16 to June 8, 2016

In partnership with Access Gallery and Burrard Arts Foundation’s Twenty-three Days at Sea, CAG hosts artist Amaara Raheem at the Burrard Marina Field House for a one month production period.

Twenty-three Days at Sea offers a unique residency aboard a cargo ship sailing from Vancouver to Shanghai. Raheem, Sri Lankan born, and now based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, is an in(ter)dependent dance artist. Feeding off her own experience of in-betweenness, Raheem’s practice investigates the aesthetics and ethics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. Currently a PhD Candidate in the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University, Raheem is ultimately interested in questioning the coherence of systems that humans create to “know” the world around them, creating arrangements that offer uncertainty, play and new possibilities.

Following the residency, Raheem will feature in the group exhibition Twenty-three Days at Sea, Chapter One: Nour Bishouty, Christopher Boyne, Elisa Ferrari and Amaara Raheem which opens at Access Gallery on May 27, 2016.

In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
With performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7:00 PM
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is ‘Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s’ fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, the Contemporary Art Gallery will host her at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio to process the experience and produce her work for the exhibition, which opens May 27, 2016.

At this event, held in her temporary place of residence at the CAG Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, and Raheem will perform a new work in response to her time at sea. More information to follow at accessgallery.ca.
Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects, and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and the Contemporary Art Gallery. Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. Access is grateful for the ongoing support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the British Columbia government through the BC Arts Council and BC Gaming, the City of Vancouver, and our donors, members, and volunteers.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Amaara Raheem


Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7pm
Off-site: Pyatt Hall at VSO School of Music, Vancouver

Ticket available at: www.picatic.com/CAGglass

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a new performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Camille Norment in collaboration with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

Norment performs with a glass armonica, a legendary eighteenth century instrument that creates ethereal music from glass and water. Combined with EMU’s reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making, Norment and EMU will develop a work that resonates with local history.

Songs for Glass Island will use US visual artist Robert Smithson’s failed 1969 proposal for the Strait of Georgia, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass) as point of departure. Granted permission by the Canadian Government, Smithson planned encrusting Miami Islet west of Fraser Point in 100 tons of broken glass. However, as public pressure against the idea mounted from environmentalists and anti-Americanists, it was suspended by a governmental telegram. Aside from drawings, letters, and plans, the only physical artifacts which remain are studies which Smithson called “maps.” What would have been Smithson’s first “permanent” earthwork morphed via the idea’s failure into the famous Spiral Jetty made the following year.

Throughout March and April, Norment will be in residence at the University of Victoria where she will be writing and rehearsing with EMU members. Using glass in various forms as their primary instruments, they will prepare a set of inter-related works including newly developed instrumentation, that imagine the possible sounds, stories, textures and ecologies of Smithson’s fabled island. Reflecting the themes in structure and content, sound will weave viscerally through this glass world, the project residing in realistic and fantasy scenarios provoked by Smithson’s proposal: glass as a material; glass in acoustic and marine ecology; inevitable mounds of post-catastrophe glass shards; and metaphors associated with glass, such as glass ceilings, broken barriers, reflection, transparency and invisibility.

Through the creative process, the juxtaposition of the practices of sound and experimental music performance in glass will create a visually stunning and sonically captivating audiovisual concert-length program that will debut in progress at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and be followed by its premiere performance in Vancouver presented by CAG at Pyatt Hall. Recordings of these works and performances will be subject to a subsequent audio publication.
CAG will also partner later this year with Norment and the Montreal Biennale.

Camille Norment is a multidisciplinary American artist living in Oslo, Norway. Her work has been the subject of numerous international exhibitions and performances including the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2013) and a commissioned artwork and performance for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2012). In 2015 she presented Rapture, a site-specific, sculptural and sonic installation in the Nordic Pavilion for the Venice Biennale. She regularly performs and records with the Camille Norment Trio in which she plays the glass armonica.

EMU is a sound ensemble of LaSaM Music from Victoria, British Columbia featuring performer/composers Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, Paul Walde and producer Kirk McNally. During the past four years EMU has developed a reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making.

Songs for Glass Island is presented in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Camille Norment and Experimental Music Unit - Songs for Glass Island


From fall 2015 to Spring 2016, CAG presents a six-month independent study residency with locally based artist, Fabiola Carranza. Considering the intertwining of art practice, community organization and public programing, Carranza is using the Burrard Marina Field House as a studio space from where to conduct her own research and to collaborate with CAG on a series of public programs. The artist’s multi-faceted practice focuses on issues that arise from the historical and cultural specificities of her source materials, be it photographs, poems or found objects, whereby she attempts to draw out humour and pathos through a combination of intuitive experimentation and study.

Using the space as a site to examine open learning and discussion, and as a means to foster her own artistic development, Carranza’s programming extends the use of the field house to the immediate members within her artistic community alongside bi-monthly studio visits with both CAG staff and other artists working with the gallery. Events have seen invitations made to a series of artists, poets and musicians, including for example, poetry workshops for visual artists led by local writer Marguerite Pigeon, and a stream of music/art events coordinated by Sydney Hermant.

Events have included:

Ceramics Workshop with Nathalee Paleonelli.
Thursday, November 26, 2015

Turkish Coffee Readings with Dilara Akay: poster commission by Derya Akay.
Saturday, November 28, 2015

Cochineal Dye Vat Workshop and Napkin Sewing. Cochineal Vat Workshop led by Sydney Hermant.
Thursday, December 17, 2015

Epic Dresses: Where Poetry and Women’s Work interweave.
Seminar with Marguerite Pigeon
Wednesday January 27, 2016

J’ai Faim, J’ai Froid (I’m Hungry, I’m Cold) – Sing for Your Supper  
Open Mic with  MC Casey Wei and special guests Monique Levesque and Nikki Never.
Organised by Sydney Hermant.
Thursday, March 3, 2016

 

 

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Burrard Marina Field House Residency: Fabiola Carranza


Walter Scott
July 1 to 31, 2015

Scott is an artist from Kahnawake whose work is based in writing and illustration and is known for his ongoing comic book series, Wendy, which follows the fictional narrative of a young woman living in an urban centre, whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed by her fears and desires. In July, Scott will begin research towards a new Vancouver-specific commission exploring collaborative performance and script writing. He will also be leading workshops with the Native Youth Program at the Museum of Anthropology. Scott will also be working along side artist Keg de Souza on the summer youth program EXCHANGE.

Scott currently lives and works between Toronto and Montréal. For the Images Festival 2015, Scott produced Wendy Live! where a cast of English, Japanese and Mohawk-speaking performers enacted the newest Wendy book before its 2016 North American English-language release. Alongside his comic work, Scott produces work involving printmaking and sculpture and is represented by Macaulay & Co. Fine Art, Vancouver. He recently completed a residency at the Koganecho Bazaar, Yokohama, Japan.

 

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Burrard Marina Field House - Walter Scott


Maddie Leach
June to July, 2015

Taking up residency earlier this year in June, Maddie Leach began research towards a Vancouver-based project. Leach’s practice is one that seeks ways of making artworks as a means to interpret and respond to specific context, through a lengthy process of enquiry and social interaction establishing relationships between form, materials, locations, histories, events, individuals and communities.

Leach was nominated for the Walters Prize 2014 for If you find the good oil let us know (2012–›2014), created during a two year residency at Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, a town known for its oil and gas exploration on New Zealand’s North Island. The project centered on 70 ‚litres of supposed ‘whale oil’. With layered and complex associations to whaling from indigenous sustenance to colonial/capitalist industry, whale oil speaks to New Zealand’s past and evokes its new economic boom in crude oil exploration. Leach sought to return this mythic substance to the sea, beginning a tangential journey that ended with a cube of cement made from the firing of 70 litres of mineral oil relocated to the seabed several kilometres off the coast. Through such ephemeral aesthetic actions and an unfolding public dialogue, this search for the authenticity of the ‘whale oil’ connected fragmented industrial and cultural narratives central to the context of New Zealand. Sharing her unfolding research, Leach then invited fourteen individuals to offer written letters as responses to the work, the only stipulation being to begin the letter with ‘Dear.’ The texts became a series of ‘Letters to the Editor’ in the Taranaki Daily News developing a curious narrative composed by multiple authors, from scientists to sailors, cement workers to oil-industry executives.

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Burrard Marina Field House - Maddie Leach


Keg de Souza
Appetite for Construction
September 10 to November 4, 2016
Off-site: 544 Main Street, Vancouver

Upcoming events:
Drop in hours: 1-5pm
Last weekend – Saturday, October 29 and Sunday, October 30

Closing reception: Friday, November 4, 6-9pm.

We welcome back to Vancouver Australian artist Keg de Souza, on her final visit to the city, de Souza presents a public project exploring food culture as a metaphor for urban displacement. Throughout October, de Souza will operate from a temporary space in the former Park Lock Dim Sum/Seafood Restaurant on the second floor of 544 Main Street in Chinatown. From this location she will initiate a food mapping installation developed via a series of public events, workshops and discussions centered on this disused space, the last original building standing on the corner of Main and Keefer.

Participants are invited to contribute items that represent the changing urban fabric of the Chinatown/DTES area through its food culture. Each participant’s items will be vacuum bagged and used to create a tile in the construction of a temporary structure within the Chinatown space. The numerous vacuum bags will create a patchwork surface that represents various community members, and their insights into local food culture and gentrification. Items could range from: menus from new upmarket establishments; packaging from iconic restaurants of the area, soup kitchen fliers, info on urban farming or even something grown from an urban farm.  In Vancouver, De Souza is developing a series of community based workshops throughout 2015-16 engaging participants in a critical dialogue regarding local food production. De Souza is working closely with various local urban farmers, food security activists and community members to explore the food politics within the city as both evidence of and a metaphor for urban displacement through gentrification.

Over the past eighteen months de Souza has been conducting research in Vancouver hosting a series of events experimenting with tactics of public engagement. In 2015, her handmade inflatable dome became a temporary space at the Burrard Marina Field House for a public picnic engaging Canadian colonial narratives via a consideration of national food traditions. Meeting with local chefs, food activists and residents de Souza prepared a truly Canadian feast as a source for an afternoon of unfolding dialogue that the artist mapped directly onto the floor of the dome. A starting point for the discussion was the ephemerality of the event itself. De Souza hosted a second event, an urban foraging expedition culminating in jam making, experimental mapping and a discussion exploring local foods, cultural preservation and the continuing effects of colonization in contemporary Vancouver. The event featured two local guest collaborators, Lori Snyder, an Indigenous Herbalist specializing in urban foraging for wild, edible and medicinal plants; and Lori’s partner, Steve Snyder, a master jam maker for the last 15 years. This two-day event began with a foraging tour led by Lori Snyder focusing on the native blackberry, the introduced blackberry and other native plants. Participants foraged on the banks surrounding the Field House which are covered with wild Himalayan Blackberries — an invasive, ‘colonizing,’ non-native species in Vancouver. On the second day, Steve Synder led a jam making session with the foraged berries. While communally making jam, de Souza led a discussion focused on the act of preserving these locally dominant berries, questioning whose culture is in fact preserved and how this can be linked to colonial narratives. This discussion culminated in an experimental mapping of the dialogue.

Australian artist de Souza investigates the politics of space informed through a formal training in architecture combined with her experiences such as squatting in Redfern, Sydney. De Souza’s work emphasises participation and reciprocity, and often involves the process of learning new skills and fostering relationships to create site and situation-specific projects. For over ten years she has self-published her hand-bound books and ‘zines under the name All Thumbs Press.

Recent exhibitions include; Redfern School of Displacement for the 20th Biennale of Sydney; Abundance: Fruit of the Sea, Bounty of the Mountains for the 2016 Setouchi Triennale (2016). Temporary Spaces, Edible Places: Vancouver and Preservation, Contemporary Art Gallery; Temporary Spaces, Edible Places: New York, AC Institute, New York (2015). Temporarily in Architecture, Food and Communities, Delfina Foundation, London; Temporary Spaces, Edible Places, Atlas Arts, Isle of Skye, Scotland; If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood … Ratmakan Kampung, Yogyakarta, Indonesia (2014). The 5th Auckland Triennial, 15th Jakarta Biennale and Vertical Villages at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney (2013).

This project is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. With special thanks to Left of Main.

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program were an ongoing series of public events for all ages. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver, along with many private and individual donors. For 2016–2019 we acknowledge the generous support for the Field House Studio Residency Program by the Vancouver Foundation.

Follow the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.wordpress.com

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Off-site: Keg de Souza - Appetite for Construction


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the first solo exhibition of Canadian artist Krista Belle Stewart, the culmination of fall 2014 residencies at the Nisga’a Museum and Western Front comprising new works developed in Nisga’a and at her ancestral home in Douglas Lake, BC.

Stewart’s practice reclaims personal and cultural narratives from archival material, situating them in dialogue with contemporary Indigenous discourse and engaging the complexities of intention and interpretation. In relation to this reframing of documents, Stewart’s new installation considers First Nations women’s self-representation and sovereignty. Working with her personal stories and those of the women she met in Nisga’a, Stewart investigates how cultural knowledge is created and exchanged, weaving together new lens-based works with archival photographs and objects from Nisga’a.

Central to the exhibition was an ongoing project, a bucket filled with distinctive dried clay from land owned by Stewart on the Douglas Lake reservation, and passed down to her from her mother’s family. Not only is this a physical connection to her heritage but also a response to the continued dispossession of First Nations women’s land rights. The projections in the exhibition depicted two geographically and culturally diverse landscapes, showing personal stories rooted in an understanding of place evoking a diversity of embedded experiences on Indigenous land.

In 1998 the Nisga’a Nation signed a treaty with the BC and Canadian governments that recognized their land sovereignty and right of self-government, the first to be signed in the province since the 1850s. Such recent challenges to government control of Indigenous lands, also including the current fight against Kinder Morgan and the Northern Gateway pipelines and “Idle No More”, highlight a growing urgency in First Nations communities to detach from Canada’s colonial confines. Although delineated by the Canadian government, both reservation and sovereign lands offer potential in developing new and revived connections with pre-colonial First Nations economic and political traditions.

Opened in 2011 in the town of Laxgalts’ap (also known as Greenville), the Nisga’a Museum holds over 300 repatriated cultural objects that have been absent from the community for over a century. It is a multifarious space operating as a potential economic driver in the community as both a monument to and entry point into Nisga’a culture, while also existing as a site seeking to develop intimate dialogues among contemporary Nisga’a and their ancestors. While hosting a permanent installation that utilizes the tropes of colonial histories through the development of a linear and didactic narrative of Nisga’a culture, it is also an institution evolving through engagement with local community. Lacking detailed archival notes on each object, the museum has focused on connecting Nisga’a oral histories with these artefacts through tours and ongoing conversations with community elders. The Nisga’a is made up of four pdeek (tribes): Laxsgiik (Eagle), Gisk’aast (Killer Whale), Ganada (Raven), and Laxgibuu (Wolf). With ceremonies, customs and histories specific to each tribe there are layers of conflicting interpretations and information for many objects in the collection. Through the repatriation of their material cultural history is emerging a contemporary revival of precolonial traditions, asserting the museum as platform for active knowledge exchange across generations and offering opportunities for personal and collective decolonization.

Alongside new works Stewart selected pieces from the Nisga’a Museum including an image showing a Nisga’a woman in a full chief’s regalia surrounded by men dressed in traditional and western clothing. Originally shot by Benjamin Haldane, a Tsimshian photographer from Alaska who travelled throughout the Nass Valley area in the early 1900s actively documenting the people of his community until his death in 1941. Recording a time of great cultural and social upheaval on the northwest coast his images of families, social events and traditional ceremonies such as potlatches (illegal at the time) document a contemporary and evolving culture. Haldane’s photographs offer an example of First Nations self-representation, a counter to the more usual colonial-settler’s gaze.

There is a kinship between Haldane’s and Stewart’s practices through the production of complex and diverse documents of First Nations self-representation. Within this Stewart infiltrates male-centered narratives of colonial culture and reasserts connections to pre-colonial matriarchal traditions while considering the tensions present between the institution as colonial support structure and a living entity shaped by the community it represents.

This project was made possible with the generous support provided by the First Peoples’ Cultural Council, British Columbia Arts Council, the Nisga’a Nation through the Nisga’a Lisims Government. Production was supported through a Media Arts Residency at the Western Front. Additional assistance provided by Budget Car and Truck Rental, Terrace.

Krista Belle Stewart is a member of the Upper Nicola Band of the Okanagan Nation, living and working in Vancouver and Brooklyn. Exhibitions include Fiction/Non-fiction at The Esker Foundation, Calgary and Music from the New Wilderness, Western Front, Vancouver. At Western Front, Stewart produced a collaborative multimedia performance working with, circa 1918, waxcylinder recordings by anthropologist James Alexander Teit of her great-grandmother, Terese Kaimetko. A string quartet responded live to Stewart’s loops of these traditional Okanagan songs presented alongside visual projections. Most recently, Stewart was commissioned by the City of Vancouver as part of the “Year of Reconciliation,” Public Art Project at the entrance to the Canada Line City Centre Station at Granville and Georgia where Stewart’s Her Story, a public photo mural and video installation, utilized footage of a CBC documentary entitled Seraphine: Her Own Story, a scripted interpretation of her mother’s journey from residential school to becoming BC’s first Aboriginal public health nurse. This work was also exhibited in Where Does it Hurt? at Artspeak. Stewart juxtaposes the 1967 film, in which her mother plays herself, alongside a video of her mother’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission interview, generating a conversation between depiction and lived experience.

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Krista Belle Stewart - Motion and Moment Always


Contemporary Art Gallery and Ballet BC:  Build a unique art-dance commission

The CAG and Ballet BC in association with the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative are excited to announce a new project.

For our project, selected by independent jury for Art|Basel’s curated page on Kickstarter, we are commissioning visual artists John Wood and Paul Harrison to team with the renowned dancers of Ballet BC, to produce a collaborative cross-disciplinary performance combining the very best in both contemporary dance and visual art.

Read more about the project here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

Or go to the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative page here: https://www.kickstarter.com/pages/artbasel?ref=artbasel

The funds will be used to bring the visual artists to Vancouver for an intensive development period during spring and fall 2015 with the premiere in 2016.

The collaboration between CAG and Ballet BC recognizes the distinctive contribution each of us brings to the project, making the whole much bigger than the sum of its constituent parts. Our supporters are a major part of this, extending that partnership into a broader sense of sharing and building a real community involvement in this dynamic venture.

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John Wood & Paul Harrison - CAG/Ballet BC: Build a unique art/dance commission


Marie Lorenz – Tidal Dérive
September 1 to 7, 2015 

Fraser River: Hope to Richmond, September 1 to 3 
Salt Spring Island to Isle-de-Lis/Rum Island, September 5 to 7

Schedule may change depending upon water and weather conditions. Click here for a map and itinerary of the journey. www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/blog/map

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes New York-based artist Marie Lorenz back to Vancouver. Join Lorenz on a week-long journey down the Fraser River and around the South Gulf Islands using the tides and currents as a guide.

In 2014, Marie Lorenz participated in a CAG residency at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio which included the construction and launch of a boat created from salvaged wood found around Vancouver and the lower mainland coast line. Driftboat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed tidal dérives in San Francisco and most recently along the Russian River, Guerneville, California. From September 1 to 7, Tidal Dérive will unfold as an ambitious multi-day trip along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands. Along the route Lorenz will invite participants to boat with her.

Studying tidal charts of the area, Lorenz uses tides and currents to direct the journey. This simple act offers the unique and unfamiliar experience of viewing river banks, harbours, industrialized landscapes and cities from the water. The experience and movement of floating, powered by natural forces, allows for keen observations and further exploration. As Lorenz describes:

“I believe that the act of floating has an impact on observation. The viewer maintains an awareness of their balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. My boat projects are an attempt to un-know the metropolis by continually exploring it”
Launching from Hope, BC on September 1 and arriving in Richmond on September 3, the voyage uses tidal currents and historic canoe routes. Participants will join Lorenz on this exploratory journey camping overnight in river-side towns and regional parks, navigating the currents while continuing on from Salt Spring Island on September 5, travelling to Portland Island and Isle-de-Lis, returning September 7.

We are reaching out to canoers and kayakers interested in accompanying artist Marie Lorenz on the week-long journey: Tidal Dérive. To RSVP or for further information contact: [email protected] or call us directly at 604 681 2700.

We acknowledge the generous support of the U.S. Consulate General Vancouver.

BIO: Marie Lorenz was born in Twentynine Palms, California and grew up traveling with her military family. Lorenz has received grants from Artists Space, the Harpo Foundation and the Alice Kimball English Travel Fellowship. In 2008 she was awarded the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize for the American Academy in Rome. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including High Desert Test Sites in Joshua Tree, CA, to MoMA PS1, in New York City. She has completed solo projects at Jack Hanley Gallery in New York; Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK and Artpace in San Antonio, Texas. Her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi (www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org) is an exploration of the coastline in New York City.
Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City and other cities in North America in boats that she designs and builds; her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted material forms explores the intertidal zone. Read more on her ongoing project ‘The Tide and Current Taxi’, www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org. For more information on artist Marie Lorenz go to www.marielorenz.com.

Public events:
Launch event in Hope, BC Time: 9am Place: ‘Put in’ at Wardle Street and 7th Avenue.

Talks and Tours: Our Working Waterfront/Tidal Dérive Thursday, September 3, 5-7pm, free
Our Working Waterfront Guided Tour with Curator, Oana Capota – 5pm New Westminster Museums & Archives 777 Columbia Street, New Westminster
Tidal Dérive Artist Talk with artist Marie Lorenz – 6pm Samson V Maritime Museum 880 Quayside Drive, New Westminster Join an evening of exploring the Fraser River through two unique public programs: A tour of Our Working Waterfront, 1945-2015 at the New Westminster Museum and Archives led by Curator, Oana Capota (5-6pm) followed by an artist talk and public conversation with artist Marie Lorenz (6-7pm). Lorenz Tidal Dérive is a multi-day float along the Fraser River and Southern Gulf Islands in a boat Lorenz made from driftwood found along Vancouver’s shoreline. Lorenz’ The vessel will be on display.

About the Burrard Marina Field House Residency Program: Burrard Marina Field House Studio: 1655 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver. (Located below the Burrard Bridge, near Vanier Park) The Field House Studio is an artist residency space and community hub organized by the CAG. Since 2013 the CAG has hosted several national and international artists including: Raymond Boisjoly, artist collective- Broken City Lab, Brendan Fernandes, Marie Lorenz, Harrell Fletcher, Sameer Farooq & Mirjam Linschooten, Maddie Leach, Keg de Souza and Walter Scott. Read more about the artist-in-residency projects here: http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/blog-category/field-house-studio/ The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of many private and individual donors toward this program. For more details about the Field House Studio Program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and follow the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.wordpress.com

Tidal Dérive
Itinerary – September 1 – 7, 2015
HOPE, BC: September 1st; Put in @ 9:00am, arrive earlier to prepare
Boat Launch at corner of Wardle St. and 7th Ave. in Hope, BC
Travel: 9:00am – 2:00pm
Stop: Fraser River Ecological Reserve
Camp: Kirby Historic Site (near Harrison Mills)
KIRBY SITE: September 2nd; Launch @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop/Camp: Derby Reach Regional Park
DERBY REACH: September 3rd; Launch @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop: Arrive at New Westminster mid-morning
Continue: to coast final point will be determined by tidal flow
September 4: Commute to Salt Spring Island via Ferry.
SALT SPRING ISLAND: September 5th; Put in at Fulford Harbour @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Shell Beach Campsite, Portland Island
PORTLAND ISLAND: September 6th; Launch @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Isle de Lis (Rum Island) (only 3 self-service sites)
ISLE-De-LIS/RUM ISLAND: September 7th; Launch @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 4:00pm
Return to: Salt Spring Island

Further information on the project:

Over the past two years Marie Lorenz has participated in a sequence of residencies at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House resulting in the development of a new Pacific-based series of projects centred on the launch of a handmade boat constructed from driftwood found along Vancouver’s coast line. The boat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed “tidal derives” in San Francisco with Southern Exposure and most recently along the Russian River with Look Up Gallery in Guerneville, California.

In September the project will culminate in a multi-day dérive with the boat along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands, Lorenz inviting participants to join her along the route. Studying tidal charts of the area, the artist uses tides and currents to direct and drift the navigation of ocean and rivers. This simple act of journeying along the contemporary ecosystem and industrialized commercial port of Fraser offers a different and unfamiliar experience of space for city residents who travel over these bodies of water daily. The experience of floating, of movement controlled by natural forces, adds a specific dimension to one’s own observation: the viewer made aware of their own balance and form as they absorb the details of their surroundings, creating something new from something familiar. The journey will be live-streamed via (website) for the land-bound audience to follow, providing a mediated representation of the visceral experience of the expedition.

Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City in boats that she designs and builds, her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted, material forms that explore the intertidal zone. She envisions a city harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore; reorganizing things that we value and representing things that were thrown away. The tide examines the nature of each object with its own incomprehensible order; Lorenz’s driftwood boat a way to gather and record evidence in collaboration with the tide.

————–

The CAG was delighted to welcome back New York-based artist Marie Lorenz to the Burrard Marina Field House as artist-in-residence during May-June 2014.

For this residency, Lorenz is fabricating a new vessel – a handmade boat – from driftwood found along the coastline of the lower mainland and the City of Vancouver. Lorenz first visited Vancouver in December 2013 to begin research for the residency and she has returned again this month to construct and launch of her exciting site-specific project Driftboat.

Lorenz’ artistic practice explores the intertidal zone of cities. She envisions a harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore. By building and launching a driftwood boat Lorenz is gathering, recording and collaborating with the natural ebb and flow of the environment. Floating out into False Creek and English Bay in the ‘driftboat’ begins a new kind of dialogue, working to reveal the tidal harbour of Vancouver.

As part of her residency, and in participation with the Vancouver Maritime Museum, on Thursday, May 29, Lorenz was in conversation with Vancouver artists Rebecca Bayer and Josh Hite talking about beachcombing, along with local sailor and writer, R. Bruce Macdonald and treasure hunter, Phil Macska. The following Sunday, June 1, Lorenz, Bayer and Hite complemented their talk by hosting two beachcombing workshops with R. Bruce Macdonald and Phil Macska.

Driftboat was constructed then launched in early June with participatory special events, finally travelling down the west coast, to San Francisco to be presented in the exhibition Off Shore at Southern Exposure later this summer.

For this residency we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.

Marie Lorenz – 2013 visit and 2014 project

In  December 2013, Marie Lorenz visited Vancouver to begin research for a project completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Marie Lorenz: Tidal Dérive


Join artist Derya Akay, Hayat Shabo and her daughter Carmen Aldakhlallah of Tayybeh as they explore Syrian cuisine

RSVP your ticket here: https://www.picatic.com/event14912617773169

Please note tickets are very limited.

Hayat Shabo, a chef originating from Damascus, and her daughter Carmen Aldakhlallah will discuss traditional Syrian dishes while demonstrating how to prepare kibbeh, minced meat, onion and bulgur balls.

All participants are welcome to try their hand at making kibbeh under Hayat’s guidance. Over the afternoon there will be opportunities to taste a range of Syrian recipes and share stories about food traditions.

This event is presented in collaboration with Tayybeh, a nascent organisation that aims to support Syrian women in Vancouver by organising community-based dining experiences. By showcasing beautiful and authentic dishes from their hometowns in Syria, the women of Tayybeh have access to an income and financial independence. Working together, they build connections with other women and interact with the communities they live in. All while doing something they love: cooking.

The word “tayybeh” in Arabic is the feminine construction that means “kind”, and in the colloquial Levantine dialect means “delicious.”

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes Vancouver-based artist Derya Akay as the CAG Burrard Marina Field House resident this spring. Expanding on recent projects, Akay is collaborating with women elders from a range of cultural backgrounds to explore and share local and diasporic culinary traditions through a series of workshops and meals. This convivial partaking of food is a gateway to oral history, which Akay understands as both storytelling and the sensations and memories summoned through communal eating.

About the Burrard Marina Field House
Throughout 2017 CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each working toward participatory projects to be realised throughout 2017–2019. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organised by CAG. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter, participate and connect with art and artists.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver, along with many private and individual donors. Please visit our website for a full list of supporters. For further details about the program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.blog

For 2016–2019 we acknowledge the generous support of the Field House Studio Residency Program by the Vancouver Foundation

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Derya Akay and Tayybeh explore Syrian cuisine


Derya Akay – The Chosen Food: Mantι, Börek, Baklava – Shabbat Dinner & Fresh Challah
Sunday, April 2, 5-8pm
The Jewish Museum and Archives of BC
6184 Ash Street, Second Floor, Vancouver

$40
Purchase tickets here

CAG and The Jewish Museum and Archives of BC are pleased to present The Chosen Food: Mantι, Börek, Baklava – Shabbat Dinner & Fresh Challah. This is the second event in the series Mantι, Börek, Baklava by Vancouver-based artist Derya Akay, the current CAG Burrard Marina Field House resident this spring. Akay will prepare a dinner informed by the family recipes of Jewish community members Sara Ciacci, Leonor Etkin, Claire Hammer, and Debbie Kafka. Several of these women will be present to share the history, memory and symbolism associated with the dishes served.

Expanding on recent projects, Akay is collaborating with women elders from a range of cultural backgrounds to explore and share local and diasporic culinary traditions through a series of workshops and meals. This convivial partaking of food is a gateway to oral history, which Akay understands as both storytelling and the sensations and memories summoned through communal eating.

This event is also the first evening in The Jewish Museum and Archives of BC supper club series, The Chosen Food. Each event in this series will showcase a regional style of Jewish cuisine. Read more here: www.jewishmuseum.ca/program/the-chosen-food/

 

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Derya Akay - The Chosen Food: Mantι, Börek, Baklava - Shabbat Dinner & Fresh Challah


Cooking with Maria Dyulgerova & her granddaughter Biliana Velkova

Burrard Marina Field House, 1655 Whyte Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada

We invite participants to join in the preparation and enjoyment of the food while sharing stories and conversation.

Tickets are free can be reserved here.
Limited tickets are available, a wait list will be available.

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes Vancouver-based artist Derya Akay as the CAG Burrard Marina Field House resident this spring. Expanding on recent projects, Akay is collaborating with women elders from a range of cultural backgrounds to explore and share local and diasporic culinary traditions through a series of workshops and meals. This convivial partaking of food is a gateway to oral history, which Akay understands as both storytelling and the sensations and memories summoned through communal eating.

About the Burrard Marina Field House
Throughout 2017 CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each working toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2017–2019. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by CAG. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter, participate and connect with art and artists.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver, along with many private and individual donors. Please visit our website for a full list of supporters. For further details about the program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.blog

For 2016–2019 we acknowledge the generous support of the Field House Studio Residency Program by the Vancouver Foundation.

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Derya Akay, cooking with Maria Dyulgerova & her granddaughter Biliana Velkova


The Big Draw – Keg de Souza
Saturday, October 1, 12-3pm
*Off-site: 544 Main Street – entrance on Keefer Street

Australian artist Keg de Souza will be working from a temporary studio in Chinatown as part of the final phase of her eighteen month residency in Vancouver. Developing on from a series of public participatory events examining food culture as a metaphor for urban displacement, for ‘The Big Draw’ the artist will conduct an exploratory food mapping project of the Strathcona neighbourhood by inviting people to become urban cartographers and contribute to a large-scale collaborative map considering local shops, restaurants, urban farms and our interconnected relationships/experiences to them.

Presented as part of ‘The Big Draw’, the world’s largest drawing festival and Culture Days, a Canada-wide celebration that raises the awareness, accessibility, participation and engagement of Canadians in the arts and cultural life of their communities.

For more information and workshop times visit: www.drawvancouver.com

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CAG & The Big Draw - Keg de Souza


Artist talk and project launch with Keg de Souza
Wednesday September 28, 7pm
544 Main Street, Vancouver

We welcome back to Vancouver Australian artist Keg de Souza, on her final visit to the city, de Souza presents an artist talk and a public project exploring food culture as a metaphor for urban displacement. De Souza will discuss her recent projects including the Redfern School of Displacement, presented as part of the 20th Biennale of Sydney. This project reflected on the ongoing activism, debate, speculation and political rhetoric concerning displacement and gentrification in Sydney.

Throughout October, de Souza will operate from a temporary space in the former Park Lock Dim Sum/Seafood Restaurant on the second floor of 544 Main Street in Chinatown. From this location she will initiate a food mapping installation developed via a series of public events, workshops and discussions centered on this disused space, the last original building standing on the corner of Main and Keefer.

Participants are invited to contribute items that represent the changing urban fabric of the Chinatown/DTES area through its food culture. Each participant’s items will be vacuum bagged and used to create a tile in the construction of a temporary structure within the Chinatown space. The numerous vacuum bags will create a patchwork surface that represents various community members, and their insights into local food culture and gentrification. Items could range from: menus from new upmarket establishments; packaging from iconic restaurants of the area, soup kitchen fliers, info on urban farming or even something grown from an urban farm.

De Souza’s practice investigates the politics of space, emphasizing participation and reciprocity to create site and situation-specific projects. De Souza aims to cultivate local knowledge regarding the displacement of low income, indigenous and immigrant communities in collaboration with residents and the community, creating a platform for conversation and debate.

The project in Vancouver is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body, and Left of Main.

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Off-site: Artist Talk - Keg de Souza


In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
Performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, CAG will host her at the Burrard Marina Field House to process the experience and produce work.

At this event, held at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, Raheem will also perform a new work in response to her time at sea.

Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and Contemporary Art Gallery.

Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union.

More information at accessgallery.ca

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In Conversation - Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips - with performance by the artist


‘The Madam’, was created as part of the ‘Skins’ workshop. In collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology, Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the Initiative for Indigenous Futures (IIF), a branch of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), Skawennati led an intensive workshop called ‘Skins’ participating in MOA’s Native Youth Program. Supported by the British Columbia Arts Council Youth Engagement program.

‘Skins’ involved six Indigenous youth currently participating in the Native Youth Program, part of an ongoing relationship between CAG and MOA. Hosted at ECUAD, the workshop began with an exploration of storytelling as oral tradition folding into how stories can be told in new ways through ‘machinima’ (a portmanteau of “machine” and “cinema”).

Calvin Charlie-Dawson – Squamish, Stó:lō, Kwakwaka’wakw
Dusty Carpenter – Heiltsuk
Latisha Wadhams – Kwakwaka’wakw
Karoleena Medina – Heiltsuk
Jennifer Pahl – Tsimshian, Nisga’a , Gitxsan
Isaiah Wadhams – Squamish, Stó:lō, Kwakwaka’wakw

Montreal based, Kanien’keha:ka artist Skawennati’s project with CAG, ‘machinima’ workshops that use new technologies, virtual environments and video games to empower Indigenous youth to tell stories in a new way.

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Video | The Madam - Skins workshop


Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Maddie Leach speaking at the ‘spaced symposium’ Perth, WA, Australia.

Reflecting on the spaced 2: future recall projects, the spaced symposium presented a day of discussions addressing the relationship between museums, contemporary art and communities.

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Video | Maddie Leach - Spaced Symposium - courtesy of spaced 2


Krista Belle Stewart
Nisga’a Museum New Visions Artist Residency

This Fall, in partnership with the Nisga’a Museum, the CAG launched a collaborative artist in residence project. Vancouver based Okanagan/Upper-Nicola artist Krista Belle Stewart travelled to Nisga’a in late October to mid-November to develop new work that will be exhibited at the Nisga’a Museum. A key component to this residency is community engagement and participation. Stewart’s project is centered on narrative and storytelling. She is curious to explore, learn about and listen to the stories/oral histories of Nisga’a people, their life and connection to the land. While in residence Stewart engaged with youth and elders throughout Nisga’a’s Nass Valley through visits, talks, workshops and the sharing of stories. Investigating how these stories are being preserved in the community; how they are shared and how community members talk about the past are critical components to the residency and future work created by the artist. Out of these community engagements Stewart is developing a video-based work.

Krista Belle Stewart is a member of Okanagan/Upper Nicola Band. She lives and works in Vancouver. Stewart holds a BFA from Emily Carr University and is currently working on a MFA from Bard College in New York. Recent exhibition and performance history includes Music from the New Wilderness at The Western Front, Shelved at the Burnaby Art Gallery (with Rebecca Belmore) and the Fiction/Non-fiction at the Esker Foundation (Calgary). Krista’s work explores First Nations identity, particularly by individuals and groups who have no direct links to North American Native culture, other than through romanticized/ fetishized interest such as health products that tap into the wisdom of the elders to help relieve your carpal tunnel syndrome; sculptures and trinkets that depict proud, ideal figures, and phenomena such as the German Indianer Klub, where members don elaborate buckskin outfits while interpreting Native American song and dance. Stewart’s photographic practice creates a dialogue between past and present, the romantic and the real, creating an awareness of the implications of misrepresentation, stereotypes, and racism. Her work engages the complexities of intention and interpretation made possible by archival material. The work approaches mediation and story-telling to unfold the interplay between personal and institutional history.

Most recently, Stewart was commissioned by the City of Vancouver as part of the Year of Reconciliation. The City’s Public Art Program commissioned 10 new artist projects overall with the first five debuting in March 2014 and new projects being introduced monthly through August 2014. The Granville and Georgia entrance of the Canada Line City Centre Station will host Krista-Belle Stewart’s Her Story, a large photo mural and a video work derived from the 1967 CBC documentary Seraphine: Her Own Story about her mother, the first Aboriginal public health nurse in BC. The images reflect personal and institutional histories and the complexities of residential school history. It touches on the young woman’s journey from residential school to UBC and the city.

This artist residency is supported by and made possible through the generous funding provided by the First Peoples’ Cultural Council, British Columbia Arts Council, and the Nisga’a Nation through the Nisga’a Lisims Government.

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Nisga’a Museum New Visions Artist Residency - Krista Belle Stewart


Hello, my name is Michele Davey. I am in my third year at the University of British Columbia completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Art. I am happy to be interning and assisting with learning programs at the CAG  through my studio class Artists in Society at UBC. This internship is a special opportunity for me to work within an art institution in order to witness the process and rhythm of the gallery space.

I have been documenting and blogging about Burrard Marina Field House artist in residence, Keg de Souza and her temporary installation located in a former Dim Sum restaurant at 544 Main St.  After visiting Keg in the space, I began to examine and reflect on Vancouver’s Chinatown in new ways. I find Keg’s work very unique and I feel lucky to have witnessed the growth of her installation related to food culture, displacement and urban gentrification in Vancouver.

I am an artist of many mediums, including drawing, painting, printmaking, sound, video, and photography. Currently, I am learning how to communicate ideas visually and acquiring medium specific skills to be able to generate meaningful content. You can visit my website at www.michelejubilee.com to see more of my work. Two of my favourite mediums are photography and painting. I am excited to interact with the community and learn more about the CAG and it’s projects.

-Michele

 

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Hello from Michele, exploring learning programs at CAG.


I had the pleasure of attending a workshop CAG artist-in-residence Keg de Souza held for the multi-year Art class students of King George Secondary, a partner High School in the CAG’s education programming. The workshop involved the artists introduction of her current project with the Burrard Marina Field House Residency involving a participatory collage of matter found in Vancouver’s historic Chinatown that reflect the gentrification and displacement of the area manifesting through food culture. Keg encouraged the students to collect any items that will contribute to her project on the historical tour they embarked on shortly after. As I documented this interactive workshop whereby students were able to learn about the gentrification of the area in a historical and tangible way, I found much appreciation in to the different areas of teaching the community about contemporary artists work in diverse forms of accessibility.

As for my personal interest in contemporary art, my first cognitive memory of “contemporary art” was at age 8, when my parents took me to see La La La Human Steps ballet dance. I remember feeling an insurmountable amount of confusion as to understand the meaning of this abstract dance. This initial uncertainty did not drive me away from contemporary art however, rather provided me inspiration in to further inquiring what it means to be a contemporary artist and what we can learn from them. I now find myself in the Visual arts program at UBC, engaging in various artistic mediums, namely video/installation/drawing, and art theory and history. What I have found important within studying art and conceptual theory are the different methods that an institute, artist, or program can conduct to broaden the educative accessibility to the art that is being exhibited or discussed. The partnerships that the CAG conducts with local high schools is an amazing example of enabling a younger demographic a chance to participate in understanding various research that contemporary artists are pursuing.

I am excited to contribute to the CAG’s public programming this fall/winter. Throughout my internship here I will be conducting research on the exciting upcoming artist, Haroon Mirza, to help facilitate writing the teachers guides for Mirza’s exhibition come January. As I reflect on my preliminary experience with La La La Human Steps contemporary ballet group, I look forward to be working with the CAG’s public program to become involved in the process of educating younger demographics in to the contemporary art world. I furthermore look forward to attending Keg De Souza’s open house events, and furthermore her final showcase on November 4th at 6pm, facilitating discussion concerning the artists project and context of the community.

-Lola Storey

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Meet Lola Storey, Public Program Intern


CAG artist-in-residence Dylan Miner co-hosted with Amanda Strong an Intertextual: Art in Dialogue reading last week at grunt gallery. Dylan selected two texts to read aloud as a group: the introduction and first chapter of Maria Campbell’s Halfbreed and selections from Howard Adams’ Prison of Grass: Canada from the Native Point of View. Both centered on historical conflicts in the late-19th century between the Métis community and the Canadian government, with a focus on Louis Riel.

The excerpts were in response to Amanda’s show at grunt, which comprised three sets and a collection of dolls from her upcoming stop-motion animation, Four Faces of the Moon. The 12-minute short film will make its world premiere at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

More than 35 people were in attendance to listen, speak and learn about the Métis experience, history and culture. Bannock and tea was served to bring an atmosphere of visiting, a reference to Dylan’s ongoing series, The Elders Say We Don’t Visit Anymore. 

Intertextual: Art in Dialogue is a roving reading group held within various Vancouver galleries. The program aims to examine/critique and create/support a community based in text, recognizing the process of selection and concomitant erasure that occurs in any process of representation.

Dylan’s solo exhibition at Gallery Gachet runs through August 28. Click here for more about his practice.

This post was first published at the Burrard Marina Field House blog. Visit the site for updates on CAG artists-in-residence.

–Ines

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Intertextual: Art in Dialogue


I’m leaning against a tree, attempting to commune with it, shaded against the hot afternoon sun in the middle of Stanley Park. The trees represent our grandmothers, but I can’t even recall the species we’re among. Fir? Pine? Oak? I was always terrible with names.

Some people are hugging their leafy grandmothers tightly. I spot several closing their eyes, deep in thought and spirit. We’re in the middle of a plant walk organized by Gallery Gachet and led by Cease Wyss, an artist and self-designated “Indigenous Plant Diva.” It’s hard to not be taken with her charismatic way of speech, which imparts knowledge about the use of things like cedar bark in beguiling narrative. We learn that thimble berries and others in the rose family are good for the circulatory system, for muscle aches and high/low blood pressure.


The early summer walk was an introduction to traditional medicinal plants and what’s known as the doctrine of signatures, or the language of flora that can be read by color, texture and shape. Dylan Miner, an artist-in-residence at the CAG’s Burrard Marina Field House Studio, is conducting research on local plants as part of his ongoing series Michif, Michin (the people, the medicine).

The Métis artist and director of American Indian and Indigenous Studies at Michigan State University is interested in projects of reclamation. He uses social practice to address contemporary indigenous issues. First introduced to traditional medicine through stories of his grandfather’s grandmother, Dylan decided to revive that knowledge and, using his privilege as an artist, engage it within the gallery space.

The series involves gathering plants native to the region where he will exhibit, and creating detailed representations of each. “I think of this as collaboration with people who know that knowledge and with the plants themselves,” he said at a gathering over tea and bannock at Gachet, a continuation of another series titled The Elders Say We Don’t Visit Anymore. “I think plants are sentient beings and have knowledge…I’m not simply harvesting them; the plants are participating.”

Read more about Dylan’s thoughts on plants in Vancouver on Justseeds, an artist collective focused on social, environmental and political engagement. The opening of Michif, Michin (the people, the medicine) will be August 5, from 6-9pm at Gallery Gachet. Dylan will also lead an Intertextual: Art in Dialogue talk with the CAG at grunt gallery on August 3.

For more of his writing, visit the Justseeds’ blog.

This post was first published at the Burrard Marina Field House blog. Visit the site for updates on CAG artists-in-residence.

–Ines

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Dylan Miner and the Doctrine of Signatures


With a practice rooted in performative interventions, our newest Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Diane Borsato explores the effects of  minimal gestures on larger social structures. Her work—which in the past has dipped into the varying fields of mycology, astronomy and beekeeping—surprises with an immediately established intimacy. A feat for her projects which typically take years to develop and execute.

She is currently focused on Ikebana, or Japanese flower arrangement, for an upcoming exhibition at the CAG in 2017. Diane has long held a fascination for Japanese aesthetics, and her interest in the ephemerality of flowers has early beginnings in her university job as a florist. As part of her research in Vancouver, Diane has been visiting with local practitioners and organizations, including the Vancouver Ikebana Association (VIA).

Hollis Ho, a teacher in the Sogetsu school of Ikebana, introduced Diane to some of her students and gave a preview of their work for an upcoming exhibition at the Nitobe Memorial Garden. The special two-day show will be the Sogetsu school’s first large-scale outdoor exhibition in Vancouver, and opens this Friday (July 29).

Diane also met with Kuniko Yamamoto, president of the VIA, and Judie Glick, a former head of the association. The VIA will participate in the 40th Annual Powell Street Festival this weekend with a display and twice-daily demonstration at the Vancouver Buddhist Temple.

Her next meeting was at the Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre. She toured the centre’s garden with director-curator Sherri Kajiwara and Nick Sueyoshi, of the Vancouver Japanese Gardeners Association. Diane had a chance to become familiar with plants native to the Northwest Coast, as well as some Japanese transplants. The climate this year has been particularly encouraging to a loquat tree (biwa), which produced fruit for the first time since it was planted—perhaps an auspicious sign for Diane’s work to come.

Continuing her research, Diane visited the Nitobe Memorial Garden with Naomi Sawada, a fellow student of Ikebana and manager of public programs and promotion for the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. A stroll through the quiet garden on a hot summer’s day was perfect for a conversation about the development of Diane’s project. Inazo Nitobe (1862-1933), for whom the garden was named, was a vital figure in bridging the culture of North America and Japan.

This post was first published at the Burrard Marina Field House blog. Visit the site for updates on CAG artists-in-residence.

–Ines

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Diane Borsato and Ikebana Intrigue


Hi everyone,

My name is Mackenzie Reid Rostad. I’m excited to be joining the team at CAG as this summers Learning Assistant, made possible through the Department of Canadian Heritage, Young Canada Works program. I will learn and, occasionally, I may also assist. Primarily I will aid in hosting CAG artists in residence such as Maddie Leach and Diane Borsato, including young CAG artists through the summer intensives.

Outside CAG, I study at Simon Fraser University, currently pursuing a BFA with a major in film. Within film, my core interests are in writing, scoring and photographing projects. Most recently I completed a short road trip film ‘Without End’. Throughout the summer I will be preparing for my grad project in which I aim to explore the creative process. My involvement with CAG has given me the unique opportunity to gain insight into artists, working in various mediums, and their processes.

I look forward to my time as Learning Assistant supplementing my work both in collaboration and independent of CAG.

Best,
Mackenzie RR

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Meet Mackenzie Reid Rostad, CAG Learning Assistant


Camille Norment and Experimental Music UnitSongs for Glass Island, was presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, at Pyatt Hall, VSO School of Music. It was an engaging, performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Norment collaborating with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

It is intriguing that their collaborative sonic exploration departed from Robert Smithson’s unrealized earthwork project for Southwest BC, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass), proposed shortly before he created the famous (or is it infamous?) Spiral Jetty. Smithson’s project to cover an islet in the Strait of Georgia with crushed glass was drowned by the noisy objections of environmentalists, yet it’s echoes live on through a completely different type of (sonic) exploration. So, how does one project live through the failure of another?

A highlight of Norment and EMU’s event was our introduction to the glass armonica, a rare and legendary instrument dating back to the eighteenth century that uses glass, water and fingertips to create otherworldly sounds. These tuned glass “singing bowls” reputedly have healing properties, leading to reactions from the listener that vary from mesmerized to fearful, and even to a one-time ban on its use … strange but true! Mozart has even penned works for this enchanting instrument, and it’s other worldly sounds have accompanied music by contemporary musicians such as Linda Ronstadt, David Gilmour and Björk.

In an interview published in e-flux about her recent exhibition at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Norment touched on her fascination with the powers of sound: “I am interested in how music has long been used to facilitate both the forging and transgressing of cultural norms. Sound permeates all borders. Throughout history, fear has been associated with the paradoxical effects music has on the body and mind, and its power as a reward-giving de-centraliser of control.

Norment’s work has been described as visceral and poetic. From my personal perspective, much of my graduate research at SFU explores the human’s phenomenological relationship with the world, how our sensual experience with the surrounding environment plays a key role in defining who, and what, we are. Moreover, from an aural perspective, it is important to recognize that our location in the sonic environment is critical to our understanding and perception of it. I enjoyed exploring both of these concepts, and more, at Norment’s and EMU’s concert, immersing myself into the spellbinding soundscape.

– Jorma Kujala

Songs for Glass Island was presented by the CAG in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Tuning Into Other Worlds


Tidal Dérive – Marie Lorenz
Itinerary – September 1 to 7, 2015
HOPE, BC: September 1st; Put in @ 9:00am
Boat Launch at corner of Wardle St. and 7th Ave
Travel: 9:00am – 2:00pm
Stop: Fraser River Ecological Reserve
Camp: Kirby Historic Site (near Harrison Mills)
KIRBY SITE: September 2nd; Put in @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop/Camp: Derby Reach Regional Park
DERBY REACH: September 3rd; Put in @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop: Arrive at New Westminster mid-morning
Continue: to coast final point will be determined by tidal flow
September 4: Travel to Salt Spring Island via Ferry.
SALT SPRING ISLAND: September 5th; Put in at Fulford Harbour @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Shell Beach Campsite, Portland Island
PORTLAND ISLAND: September 6th; Put in @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Isle de Lis (Rum Island)
ISLE-De-LIS/RUM ISLAND: September 7th; Put in @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 4:00pm
Return to: Salt Spring Island
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Marie Lorenz: Tidal Dérive – Itinerary & Interactive Map


Currently in August, interdisciplinary artists Sameer Farooq (Canada) and Mirjam Linschooten (France) are spending 2 weeks at the Burrard Marina Field House. Their combined practices aim to create community-based models of participation and knowledge production in order to re-imagine a material record of the present. They investigate tactics of representation and enlist the tools of installation, photography, documentary filmmaking, writing and the methods of anthropology to explore various forms of collecting, interpreting, and display. The result is often a collaborative work which counterbalances how dominant institutions speak about our lives: a counter-archive, alternate narrative, new additions to a museum collection, or a buried history become visible.

Farooq is currently working as a visual artist, educator, designer, and is a member of the documentary film collective Smoke Signal Projects as director. His artist book/print editions have been distributed through Art Metropole, Toronto. Linschooten works as an independent graphic designer and artist. She works with all types of print, such as books, magazines and posters, using typography and collage to transform existing material into a visual language that challenges established systems.

Farooq and Linschooten interrogate the ideas and values of organizations, claims about what a cultural group is and “ought to be”, protocols of approaching an object and images of who the intended viewer is – and use installation, photography, documentary filmmaking, writing and the methods of anthropology to examine various forms of collecting, interpreting and display. The result is often a collaborative work which counterbalances how institutions speak about our lives, producing a counter-archive. Related to these questions Farooq and Linschooten will begin development towards a Vancouver-specific public project engaging the ways Vancouver frames its multiculturalism via ethnographic museum display.

Farooq and Linschooten have exhibited in various countries including Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey. Recent projects include Faux Guide, Trankat, Morocco; The Museum of Found Objects, Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario; The Museum of Found Objects, Istanbul, Turkish Ministry of Culture; Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue, Artellewa, Egypt. Most recently the duo completed a residency and exhibition at Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga, Ontario which explores the complex space of social codes, ideological agendas and decisions, both conscious and unconscious, of museum display. Sameer Farooq (Canada) and Mirjam Linschooten (France) collaborate on projects.

– Shalon Webber-Heffernan, CAG Learning Assistant

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Sameer Farooq and Mirjam Linschooten at the Burrard Marina Field House


Hello! My name is Shalon Webber-Heffernan, and this Summer I am super excited to be working and learning at the CAG!

I’m very happy to be working alongside CAG Curator Shaun Dacey in the role of Summer Learning Assistant, and I look forward to getting to know all the staff and volunteers at the gallery. I’m equally excited to be working with some of this Summer’s amazing Burrard Marina Field House Studio residency artists, including Maddie Leach, Keg de Souza, Walter Scott, Sameer Farooq, Harrell Fletcher and Marie Lorenz. Aside from the CAG, I am currently working towards my Master’s Degree in Cultural Studies at Queen’s University where I focus on embodied and affective knowledge, performance studies, and the so-called “pedagogical turn” in contemporary art practices.

My background is in performance, dance and theatre paired with years of experience working within community outreach settings has me thinking deeply about genuinely engaged arts praxis—what that means, and what are the implications—as well as experiential and alternate (un)learning processes and methodologies.

At the summer’s end I am lucky also to be working with international performance troupe La Pocha Nostra, where I will deepen my studies of radical performance pedagogy during an immersive training program in Tijuana, Mexico.

I look forward to seeing you around the CAG this summer!

– Shalon

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Hello from Shalon! Summer Learning Assistant


The CAG is excited to welcome back Burrard Marina Field House Studio resident Keg de Souza this evening with a screening of her film, If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood… The film, which De Souza created during her artist residency with Kunci Cultural Studies Centre in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, explores the gentrification of a neighbourhood located alongside Yogyakarta’s main river, Kali Code. In the 1970s, the Kampung Ratmakan (neighbourhood) was built by squatters on a graveyard – a characteristic that continues to affect the community living there today. Ghosts are often seen by local residents and the community relies on a local ghost expert to move the ghosts out of their houses. In 2013 the mayor announced plans to develop the area and now the residents, like the ghosts, are beginning to be displaced. In addition to the film, De Souza worked alongside the residents of Kampung Ratmakan to create an inflatable ghost house (pictured above). The interior of the ghost house features embroidered ghost stories created from drawings made by some of the local children during a ghost story workshop.

We hope to see you there!

Screening:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Wednesday, March 18th, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House

Film credits:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Keg de Souza
2014
Duration: 31:45
Single channel HD video, sound, mirrors
Indonesian and Javanese with English subtitles

Interviewees: Pak Kuncung, Ikbal, Pak Antok, Mas Anton, Pak Remi, Budeh Kom, Mbah Endang, Ibu Toko, Ersa, Pak Agus, Sania, Mak Yem.
Translator/ community liaison: Invani Lela Herliana
Sound recordist: Lucas Abela
Original music: Pawang Hantu by Senyawa
Post sound: Timothy Dwyer
Subtitling: Invani Lela Herliana, Rully Shabara

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Keg de Souza – If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…


Hello!

My name is Sally, I’m a temporary addition here, volunteering at the CAG, and with my time here hurrying by I wanted to fill you in on how I got here and all the cool stuff I’ve been doing at the CAG.

I’m from the UK and have come to Vancouver for six weeks as part of a four month adventure that has been the most memorable of my life.

My time here is part of a plan that involved leaving all the sensible things in my life, like a job and a flat so that I could stretch my legs over to the West Coast …or I should say, the ‘Best Coast.’

Things took shape after I sent some emails, one to Anchorage Museum in Alaska and the other to the CAG. I have been involved in arts and museum education since University, volunteering or working for different organizations and so I thought it would be brilliant to gain some experience overseas. The reply emails were nerve racking to open but I received, to my delight, welcoming replies. So it was decided and before I knew it I was Alaska bound, looking at the glaciers below wondering what the next four months would bring.

I spent seven weeks in Anchorage, with six of those as a volunteer at the museum getting to develop informal learning activities and facilitate family events. The photo below was taken on my phone in Sitka, onboard a little boat as I looked out for and encountered humpback whales. For me it captures how I feel about my time in Alaska.

After Anchorage I spent a couple of weeks exploring South East Alaska, Seattle and San Francisco before arriving here! My time in Vancouver keeps getting better. At the CAG I have been helping Shaun Dacey and Jas Lally with exciting projects that are teaching me loads. I have been developing learning resources for teachers to accompany the current exhibition, Shimabuku, When Sky Was Sea, helping with the CAGs first Teachers Social as well as the monthly Free Family Day   (I am now an Octopus expert… ask me anything!). I have also had the opportunity to get to know the talented team selected for The City in Motion – CAG/TELUS Garden Public Art project, I’ll have to come back to see the final installation!

I have been supported and welcomed by the CAG team, they have made sure that I eat at yummy places, find the best coffee and of course see loads of exciting art. And so I can’t say thank you enough, I’m sure my last week here will be a brilliant conclusion.

– Sally Page

P.S. Whatever you do! don’t miss the CAG and Ballet BC new partnership, a new dance+art commission with amazing UK artists John Wood and Paul Harrison. To read more click here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

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Hello from Sally! – From Anchorage to the Salish Coast


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