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Performance

Amaara Raheem
May 16 to June 8, 2016

In partnership with Access Gallery and Burrard Arts Foundation’s Twenty-three Days at Sea, CAG hosts artist Amaara Raheem at the Burrard Marina Field House for a one month production period.

Twenty-three Days at Sea offers a unique residency aboard a cargo ship sailing from Vancouver to Shanghai. Raheem, Sri Lankan born, and now based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, is an in(ter)dependent dance artist. Feeding off her own experience of in-betweenness, Raheem’s practice investigates the aesthetics and ethics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. Currently a PhD Candidate in the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University, Raheem is ultimately interested in questioning the coherence of systems that humans create to “know” the world around them, creating arrangements that offer uncertainty, play and new possibilities.

Following the residency, Raheem will feature in the group exhibition Twenty-three Days at Sea, Chapter One: Nour Bishouty, Christopher Boyne, Elisa Ferrari and Amaara Raheem which opens at Access Gallery on May 27, 2016.

In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
With performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7:00 PM
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is ‘Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s’ fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, the Contemporary Art Gallery will host her at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio to process the experience and produce her work for the exhibition, which opens May 27, 2016.

At this event, held in her temporary place of residence at the CAG Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, and Raheem will perform a new work in response to her time at sea. More information to follow at accessgallery.ca.
Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects, and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and the Contemporary Art Gallery. Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. Access is grateful for the ongoing support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the British Columbia government through the BC Arts Council and BC Gaming, the City of Vancouver, and our donors, members, and volunteers.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Amaara Raheem


Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7pm
Off-site: Pyatt Hall at VSO School of Music, Vancouver

Ticket available at: www.picatic.com/CAGglass

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a new performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Camille Norment in collaboration with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

Norment performs with a glass armonica, a legendary eighteenth century instrument that creates ethereal music from glass and water. Combined with EMU’s reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making, Norment and EMU will develop a work that resonates with local history.

Songs for Glass Island will use US visual artist Robert Smithson’s failed 1969 proposal for the Strait of Georgia, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass) as point of departure. Granted permission by the Canadian Government, Smithson planned encrusting Miami Islet west of Fraser Point in 100 tons of broken glass. However, as public pressure against the idea mounted from environmentalists and anti-Americanists, it was suspended by a governmental telegram. Aside from drawings, letters, and plans, the only physical artifacts which remain are studies which Smithson called “maps.” What would have been Smithson’s first “permanent” earthwork morphed via the idea’s failure into the famous Spiral Jetty made the following year.

Throughout March and April, Norment will be in residence at the University of Victoria where she will be writing and rehearsing with EMU members. Using glass in various forms as their primary instruments, they will prepare a set of inter-related works including newly developed instrumentation, that imagine the possible sounds, stories, textures and ecologies of Smithson’s fabled island. Reflecting the themes in structure and content, sound will weave viscerally through this glass world, the project residing in realistic and fantasy scenarios provoked by Smithson’s proposal: glass as a material; glass in acoustic and marine ecology; inevitable mounds of post-catastrophe glass shards; and metaphors associated with glass, such as glass ceilings, broken barriers, reflection, transparency and invisibility.

Through the creative process, the juxtaposition of the practices of sound and experimental music performance in glass will create a visually stunning and sonically captivating audiovisual concert-length program that will debut in progress at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and be followed by its premiere performance in Vancouver presented by CAG at Pyatt Hall. Recordings of these works and performances will be subject to a subsequent audio publication.
CAG will also partner later this year with Norment and the Montreal Biennale.

Camille Norment is a multidisciplinary American artist living in Oslo, Norway. Her work has been the subject of numerous international exhibitions and performances including the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2013) and a commissioned artwork and performance for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2012). In 2015 she presented Rapture, a site-specific, sculptural and sonic installation in the Nordic Pavilion for the Venice Biennale. She regularly performs and records with the Camille Norment Trio in which she plays the glass armonica.

EMU is a sound ensemble of LaSaM Music from Victoria, British Columbia featuring performer/composers Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, Paul Walde and producer Kirk McNally. During the past four years EMU has developed a reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making.

Songs for Glass Island is presented in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Camille Norment and Experimental Music Unit - Songs for Glass Island


Hazel Meyer
Muscle Panic
Sunday, January 31, 2016; 2pm
B.C. Binning Gallery

Hazel Meyer’s projects explore seemingly disparate yet overlapping preoccupations — intestines and athletics, feminism and the absurd, anxiety and textiles — using scale, language, repetition, gentle confrontation and ecstatic immersion. Recent projects include solo exhibitions at MacLaren Art Centre, Barrie and Art Metropole, Toronto; group exhibitions at Doris McCarthy Gallery, Scarborough and Trifecta Gallery, Las Vegas; publications with Little Joe (UK) and Idea Exchange, Cambridge and residencies at Embassy of Foreign Artists, Geneva and Scrap Metal Gallery, Toronto.

Hazel Meyer’s mutable body of work, Muscle Panic, considers the performance of the athletic. Evoking the imagery of momentous sports history, the bodily gestures and actions of a drill or warmup and the aesthetics of the gymnasium, Meyer instigates an arena of sweat and queer desire. Multiple iterations of Muscle Panic have taken the project from a rogue basketball gym built in an abandoned barn to a clandestine locker room to a warehouse-like gymnastics studio. Simultaneously an installation and a performance, Muscle Panic transforms the banal and austere white cube into a hot physically charged site for emotional and physical exchange. For CAG, Meyer has developed an installation of imagery and objects evoking the potentially queer sensibilities of the athletic. The installation will become the set for an afternoon event in which performers animate the set through a series of drills exploring endurance as gendered phenomena within sport.

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Hazel Meyer - Muscle Panic


Cindy Mochizuki
Paper

Saturday, January 30 and Sunday, January 31, 2016; 10am and 3:30pm daily

Off-site: Embark from Yaletown Ferry Dock, Quayside Marina, 1088 Marinaside Crescent and disembark at Burrard Marina Field House, 1655 Whyte Avenue

www.cagpaper.eventzilla.net

Paper introduces us to K, a woman who runs a small, family restaurant off a mysterious island along the shores of Japan. One evening, just before closing, a man appears at the door for a meal. What follows is a series of strange events that allows K to peer into a portal created by a tiny hole in her paper menu. A second chapter of Rock, Paper, Scissor an ongoing trilogy of multi-media experiences set in the time frame of 1900–2100, Paper bridges Canada and Japan through migration, water and the natural resources of coal, lumber and iron. The original Japanese version of Paper was completed in 2013 through AIR 475 artist-in-residence program in Yonago, Tottori, Japan.

For the CAG, Mochizuki has produced the English version of the audio narrative experienced on a boat ride across False Creek. The journey will culminate in a traditional chagayu (tea porridge that integrates salmon and rice) often consumed by Japanese Canadian fishermen on lengthy fishing trips out at sea.

Cindy Mochizuki creates multi-media installation, performance, animation, drawings and interdisciplinary collaborations that integrate historic ephemera and stories present within public and private archives. Interested in the methodologies of memory work and experimental narratives, her projects invoke a timeless space of both fiction and documentary. Recent exhibitions and projects include Shako Club, grunt gallery (2015), AIR 475, Yonago, Japan (2014), Fictive Communities Asia, Koganecho Bazaar, Koganecho, Japan (2014), and On the Subject of Ghosts, Hamilton Artists Inc. (2013).

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Cindy Mochizuki - Paper


Margaret Dragu
The Library Project: Interdisciplinarity as the Catalyst of Knowledge

Saturday, January 30, 2016; 11am–2pm
B.C. Binning Gallery and Reading Room

The Library Project is an ongoing series of participatory events exploring the body as a source and site of knowledge. Interrogating the strategies of contemporary academic and corporate forms of group knowledge exchange and skill building such as the TED Talk, conference, workshop and lecture, each performance playfully explores personal history, archive and pedagogy. Inspired by the Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate, Malala Yousafzai’s

call to action at the UN, “Let us pick up our books and our pens. They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the only solution.” The Library Project seeks to develop a space and platform for knowledge sharing through performative acts. For CAG, Dragu will host a daytime intensive workshop considering the idea of trans-interdisciplinarity. Alongside this in our reading room we present the video archive of the five previous iterations at the Bickersteth Library, Hart House, University of Toronto; Richmond Public Library; Kamloops Art Gallery; Your Kontinent: Richmond International Film & Media Arts Festival and Month of Performance Art, Berlin.

Margaret Dragu works in video, installation, web-based/book-publication and performance. Spanning relational, durational, interventionist and community-based practices, her performances have been presented in galleries, museums, theatres, nightclubs, libraries, universities and sitespecific venues including parks, botanical

gardens, and public parade routes across Canada, the United States and Europe. An innovator and pioneer in Canadian art, Dragu was the recipient of the Governor General’s Award for Visual and Media Arts in 2012.

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Margaret Dragu - The Library Project: Interdisciplinarity as the Catalyst of Knowledge


*PLEASE NOTE: DOUG will be performed for one night only; on Friday Jan 29. Doors open at 6pm.

Janice Kerbel
DOUG
Friday, January 29, 2016; 7pm
B.C. Binning Gallery

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the North American premiere of Janice Kerbel’s Turner Prize nominated DOUG, a musical composition and performance.

Employing recognizable conventions from a variety of disciplines — from theatre to sport to music — Kerbel’s practice utilizes existing structures while challenging expectations and traditional use. Events normally considered impossible to depict are given form that is both surprising and strangely familiar.

Commissioned by The Common Guild, Glasgow and first presented at the Mitchell Library in 2014, an ensemble of six vocalists leads the audience through a nine song cycle of imagined disasters, translating “accident” into musical form. Reflecting the acts themselves, some pieces are violently

short, others unfold at length. Voice and the structures inherent in music are used to give shape to these visceral moments, while Kerbel’s lyrics take the form of a series of rhythmic verse outlining a sequence of events going from bad to worse with titles such as Blast, Fall, Hit, Crash and Slip.

The performance is presented with musica intima and supported by Vancouver New Music. Text by Janice Kerbel. Composition by Janice Kerbel in collaboration with Laurie Bamon and Philip Venables. DOUG was initially conceived as an online project for Film and Video Umbrella.

Janice Kerbel lives and works in London, has exhibited internationally since the late 1990s and participated in numerous group exhibitions and biennales. Recent projects include The Turner Prize, Tramway, Glasgow; Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver (2015); DOUG, Common Guild, Glasgow (2014); Kill the Workers, Chisenhale, London; Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe and Walter Phillips Gallery, The Banff Centre (2011); See it Now, Art Now, Tate Britain (2010); Remarkable, commissioned for Frieze Projects (2007); and Nick Silver Can’t Sleep, commissioned by Artangel/BBC Radio 3 (2006) and presented live at Art Now Live, Tate Britain (2007). Kerbel is represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver, greengrassi, London; Galerie Karin Guenther, Hamburg; and i8, Reykjavik.

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Janice Kerbel - DOUG


For the first of six live performance events at the CAG in January 2016 we present a new work by Tiziana La Melia.

Developed from the artist’s own writing, Tiziana La Melia’s performances investigate the slippages between language and form, evoking a tension between the written and the aesthetic visual experience of performance. Creating intricate installations and objects that also operate as props, sets and costumes, La Melia develops compellingly simple vignettes that allude to a range of references from the art historical and literary to the personal and incidental, leaving the viewer to contemplate a layered and malleable composition.

For CAG, La Melia has produced a new performance Staring at the Ceiling which enacts a professional photo shoot for a set of earrings designed by the artist. Her audience become witnesses and participants in a photograph that aims to capture the glint and flash of an object captured in motion. The piece is performed in two parts, splitting physical action and spoken word.

Tiziana La Melia lives and works in Vancouver, BC and works in painting, installation, film and writing. Recent exhibitions include Francois Ghebaly, Los Angeles; Mint, Columbus;  Mercer Union, Toronto; Macaulay & Co. Fine Art, Vancouver; The Apartment, Vancouver; Xspace, Toronto; Western Front, Vancouver, and SBC Galerie, Montreal. La Melia’s writing has appeared in Night Papers V, Bartleby Review, Setup Magazine, Millions Magazine, Pelt and West Coast Line among others. Selected readings and screenings of her work include Wendy’s Subway, New York; Model, Vancouver and Trieze, Paris. In 2014, she was the Writer in Residence at TPW R&D, Toronto and the winner of the RBC Canadian Painting Competition.

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Tiziana La Melia - Staring at the Ceiling


Olivia Boudreau
Lying Bodies, Standing Bodies
Daily from: Tuesday, January 26 to Sunday, January 31, 2016; 12–6pm
Alvin Balkind Gallery

Parts of Olivia Boudreau’s diverse practice are performance and video works capturing gradual movement in real time. For example, Box (2009) is a twenty-two hour fixed frame record of a horse in its stable or Pelages (2007) documents a woman in an ash-coloured fur coat attempting to remain on her hands and knees for five hours. Simple compositions present bodies caught in the passage of time; actions unfold a range of gestures at a glacial pace capturing changes in light and movement that provoke a diversity of interpretations for the viewer.

At CAG we present Lying Bodies, Standing Bodies (2014), a performance structured as a durational loop. One performer stands observing another lying on the gallery floor. When the standing performer is tired, he or she lies down indicating to the other to get up and stand. The period of each interval is determined by the performers, a continual role reversal described. Set in the Alvin Balkind gallery, the viewer happens upon this intimate act in progress.

Olivia Boudreau has been featured in various exhibitions across Canada and Europe including solo exhibitions at the Leonard and Bina Ellen Gallery, Concordia University, Montréal, Galerie Néon in Lyon, France and at the LOOP Festival in Barcelona. In 2011 she participated in the second Québec Triennial at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal and was awarded the Pierre Ayot prize. Boudreau was longlisted for the Sobey award in 2012 and 2014.

‘Lying Bodies, Standing Bodies’ was initially produced and presented in the context of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Program in Support of Artistic Production, Concordia University.

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Olivia Boudreau - Lying Bodies, Standing Bodies


Kim Beom
December 5, 2015 to January 17, 2016

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first solo exhibition in Canada of work by Korean artist Kim Beom. Comprising a survey of work spanning over twenty years and made across a range of material and form, the exhibition presents characteristically humorous and inquisitive takes on the way we come to see and know things.

Kim is a key figure of his generation in South Korea, his ideas based in the shift created when image-making moves from language to physical form. He fundamentally resists any singular definition, partly through the eclecticism of media—drawing, video, sculpture, performance—as well as taking on seemingly disparate subjects encompassing such things as the entire body of work of a modernist Korean poet or the domestication of dogs. Regularly recalling moments in popular culture and often visualizing wordplay or puns that tip language into the absurd or create comic forms, works such as the untitled series of drawings and related video from 1991-96 are as refreshingly intriguing as they are disarming in their charm and curiosity with the world that surrounds us.

Visitors to the exhibition are welcomed by a modest canvas into which has been cut a short text. Greeting (2007) may appear almost straightforward in its appeal, captivating in the openness of its invitation, and yet it suggests the impending experience of the exhibition as an open field where the viewer can apply or should determine their own impressions.

Perception and illusion are key to Kim’s practice. While much of his work is figurative in the sense that there are recognizable representational components depicted, this lack of ambiguity is called into question whereby the stability of image or language and its ability to communicate are set in motion. In speaking about his paintings, many of which are raw canvases that have been cut into, Kim talks about this blankness as acting like “a screen for the imagery in the viewer’s mind.” In Man Standing (1995), two footprints in metal rings are attached to the surface of the work displayed flat on the floor.  Here we are asked to complete the image, conjuring the subject, imagining ourselves in the space of the piece itself.

This idea of fluid meaning can also be seen in other works that involve a notional transformation in some way – be it functional, a tautology between image to object, or a perceptual shift in the mind of the viewer. Such inventive changes may be considered witty or surreal, and achieved via the most economical of means. An Iron in the Form of a Radio, a Kettle in the Form of an Iron, and a Radio in the Form of a Kettle (2002) brings together the three household items which retain their familiarity of form and yet, as described in the title, change their function. As objects they retain their base characteristics but nonetheless are simultaneously something else, becoming other than, or more than, that which they appear to exclusively exemplify.

Such improbable transformation in both the imagination of the artist and by extension the audience can be seen in Untitled (Plants from the Places) series (2007- ongoing). Here Kim cuts photographic images of plants from magazines and newspapers sticking them together to form new “plants” that continue to grow by the addition of other pieces of green paper. Through this reusing the artist completes the cycle – trees are cut down, made into pulp which then becomes paper and is returned to being a plant. In other works, this cultivation of change is suggested by Kim with a mix of both humour and unease.

How meaning is made, who constructs it and for whom it is intended is seen more directly in works such as A Rock that was taught it was a Bird (2010) in which an absurdist gesture has an actor attempting to teach a rock to fly, unperturbed by its seeming lack of response. Yet by soaking up this instruction is the rock not altered in some way? Objects Being Taught They are Nothing But Tools (2010), is a large scale sculptural work that has common household objects placed on model chairs facing a blackboard in a familiar classroom-like setting. The objects are assembled in front of a pre-recorded, televised lecture in which the teacher’s head is cut off and his voice dubbed so that in a speeded up, squeaky voice, the orator emphatically and gravely iterates the utility of “students” and, therefore, the futility of attempting to become anything more. Tools do not go to the hospital to see doctors, the voice points out, as humans do. They are instead serviced and fixed, or simply replaced. So it goes for the student. Education is a process that involves some notional form of change: knowledge is imparted and one’s identity and views on the world around us are (in)formed. Conventional structures of learning are undermined and replaced by questioning the fabric of our collective and individual perceptions.

Kim Beom, born in 1963 lives and works in South Korea. Solo exhibitions include: Kim Beom: The School of Inversion, Hayward Gallery, London (2012); Kim Beom: Animalia, REDCAT Gallery, Los Angeles (2011); Objects Being Taught They Are Nothing But Tools, The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, (2010); Kim Beom, Artsonje Center, Seoul (2010); Beom Kim, Sun Gallery, Seoul (2007); Flower, Trans Hudson Gallery, New York (2000); Utility Objects, Trans Hudson Gallery, New York (1997). Group exhibitions include: 2013 California Pacific Triennial, Orange  County Museum of Art, Newport Beach (2013); Time Mutations, UB Art Galleries, University of Buffalo, Buffalo (2013);Tireless Refrain, Nam June Paik Art Center, Korea (2013); Unknown Forces, MSGSU Tophabe-I Amire Culture and Arts Center, Istanbul (2013); (Im)Possible Landscape, PLATEAU, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul (2013); Media City Seoul, Seoul Museum of Art (2012); City Within the City, Gertrude Contemporary  Art Spaces, Melbourne (2012); Tell me, Tell me: Australian and Korean Art 1976-2011, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2011); A Rock That Was Taught It Was A Bird, Artspace, Auckland (2010); The Malady of Writing. MACBA, Barcelona (2009); Your Bright Future: 12 Contemporary Artists  from Korea, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles (2009); The Demon of Comparisons, Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Amsterdam (2009); The Cover of a Book is the Beginning of a Journey, Arnolfini, Bristol (2008); Always a little further, 51st Venice Biennale, Venice (2005); 8th  International Istanbul Biennale, Istanbul (2003); Under Construction: New Dimensions of Asian Art, Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Tokyo (2002); Beyond Landscape, Artsonje Center, Seoul (1999). Work is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Cleveland Museum of Art; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis in the United States; the Museum für Kommunikation, in Bern, Switzerland; and the Seoul Museum of Art, the Ho-Am Art Museum, Artsonje Center, and the Horim Museum, in Seoul, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, in Gwachun, Korea.

 

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Kim Beom


Opening: Thursday, February 28 – 7-10pm
All welcome.

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents Medium-Based Time by Berlin-based Canadian artist Jeremy Shaw, featuring a black and white 16mm film of transgender voguer Leiomy Maldonado, an HD video installation that reworks archival ethnographic film into a dystopian science fiction narrative, and a new series of light-activated UV prints in the windows of our street façade.

The exhibition centres on Variation FQ (2011-13), in which Shaw worked with legendary voguer Leiomy Maldonado to produce a film that explores aspects of subculture, dance, gender, power and special effects. “Vogue” is a primarily black and latino, gay subculture that evolved out of the drag balls of New York in the 1980s and includes a fluid, yet raw dance style based around miming the poses of models from high fashion magazines.

The film sets Leiomy starkly lit against a black void performing her signature freestyle dance teetering between elegance and violence. As the film progresses, Shaw introduces step-and-repeat style visual effects, originally created by Canadian animator Norman McLaren in his 1968 ballet film Pas de deux. In Pas de deux, this optical printing technique embellishes the seduction between a male and female ballerina as typically choreographed for the stage. In Variation FQ, the use of special effects creates a ghostly layering and repetition of Leiomy’s image in her most virtuosic gestures and extends the experience of abandon evident in the consequences on her human body. Leiomy’s performance is accompanied by Shaw’s original soundtrack that combines a minimalist piano score with contemporary chopped and pitched audio techniques. This merging of classical composition with manipulated pop a cappella MP3’s is emblematic of Shaw’s fascination of the interdependence between high and low taste cultures.

Shaw’s practice amplifies conceptual strategies within the transcendence-seeking experiences of popular culture, as well as in the speculative nature of scientific mapping of these phenomena. In keeping with this ongoing interest in and around altered states, we premiere Quickeners (2014), a pseudo-documentary that puts the role of truth telling into crisis.

Set five hundred years in the future, Quickeners tells the story of Human Atavism Syndrome (H.A.S.), an obscure disorder afflicting a tiny portion of the Quantum Human population to desire and feel as their Human Being predecessors once did. A species wirelessly interconnected to The Hive, Quantum Humans have evolved to operate solely on pure rational thought and they have achieved immortality. Quickeners is set against a cinéma vérité aesthetic, reworking archival documentary footage from a gathering of Pentecostal Christian snake handlers to illustrate the story. As the film unfolds, an authoritative Quantum Human narrator comments on what we witness: indecipherable testimonials, sermons, songs, prayers, convulsive dancing, speaking-in-tongues, serpent handling and ecstatic states that Quantum Humans define as “Quickening”.

Incorporating elements of science fiction, ethnographic survey, neuroscience and belief systems, Quickeners collates these disparate themes into a succinct whole to discuss varying notions of evolutionary progress with clinical indifference. This alchemical fusion suspends belief of the fantastic situation by its use of familiar, outmoded technology, meticulous audio editing and subtitles. As the piece builds to a cathartic climax of media techniques and special effects – caught in limbo between ritual documentary and music video – the Quantum Humans surrender to this evolutionary throwback of perceived biological transcendence, while the film attempts to incite a similar phenomenological response in the viewer.

Alongside these film/video works in our window vitrines hangs Degenerative Imaging (In The Dark) (2015), a new series of light-activated, glow-in-the-dark vinyl cut-outs that reference star and planet stickers. Though presumably designed with the aspiring child astrologer’s bedroom in mind, these stickers are also commonly found adorning the walls and ceilings of the teenage psychonaut; more likely used to “trip out” than to plan a trip. Rather than the cosmos, Shaw’s source material comes from 3D SPECT scan renderings of the degenerative effects of cumulative mind-altering substance use on the blood flow and metabolism of the human brain. The representational language of neuroscience, or at least the populist aesthetic familiar in health and pharmaceutical advertising, is reformatted here as a mechanism to enhance altered states while viewing their supposed biological effects on the brain. The prints are charged by fluorescent light once per hour, causing them to glow strongly and then fade, glow and fade; static time-based mediums on repeat.

Variation FQ is generously loaned by the Rennie Collection, Vancouver

Quickeners was co-produced by the Contemporary Art Gallery with the Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève for the BIM 14 and Johann König, Berlin, with the generous support of a grant from BC Arts Council: Special Project Assistance – Innovations; the Fmac and the FCAC.

Exhibition is supported by Inform Interiors and Best Film Service Inc.

This exhibition forms part of the Capture Photography Festival, running from April 2 to 29.

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Jeremy Shaw - Medium-Based Time


Lotte van den Berg
Cinema Imaginaire
February 4 to ’6, 3pm and February 7 “to 8, 10:30 am and 3pm
110-“750 Hamilton Street (meeting point)
150 min, no intermission, $36
www.ticketstonight.ca
604 605 8284 ext.200

It happens in small groups, at an outdoor location. You will be given a series of assignments — say, focusing on a given object, or watching a certain person walk down the street. It’s not nearly as simple as it sounds and, as they say, results may vary. You may gain a sense of how your sight has been conditioned over a lifetime. You may realize, with dismay, how little you actually notice of what crosses your eyes every day. You may discover something beautiful, even revelatory, that you’d ignored a thousand times in your life. What van den Berg gives us is a sensory adventure, a reminder of how much our perception can be altered, and, on a simpler level, a reintroduction to the pleasures of the senses. There’s beauty all around us — all you have to do is look. Please note: This performance involves walking, and takes place in parts outdoors, rain or shine.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

Lotte van den Berg works in the realms of theatre, cinema and dance, performing in North America, Europe and Africa. Her work
is defined by its concern for everyday reality and for uniting theatre and audiences. Her current projects are Cinema Imaginaire and Building Conversation; in both works audience members become active participants. Past works include Les Spectateurs (2010) and Agoraphobia (2011–2012).

Creator: Lotte van den Berg | Dramaturg: Sodja Lotker | Guide: Howard Lotker | Producer: Antwan Cornelissen | Publicity: Karin van de Wiel | Manager: Anneke Tonen | Location Scouts: Other Sites* Developed in collaboration with Het Huis Utrecht and part of Festivals in Transition / Global City Local City with support of the Culture Programme of the European Union. Funded by the City of Utrecht and the KfHeinfun. Supported by Performing Arts Fund NL.

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Lotte van den Berg - Cinema Imaginaire


Contemporary Art Gallery and Ballet BC:  Build a unique art-dance commission

The CAG and Ballet BC in association with the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative are excited to announce a new project.

For our project, selected by independent jury for Art|Basel’s curated page on Kickstarter, we are commissioning visual artists John Wood and Paul Harrison to team with the renowned dancers of Ballet BC, to produce a collaborative cross-disciplinary performance combining the very best in both contemporary dance and visual art.

Read more about the project here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

Or go to the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative page here: https://www.kickstarter.com/pages/artbasel?ref=artbasel

The funds will be used to bring the visual artists to Vancouver for an intensive development period during spring and fall 2015 with the premiere in 2016.

The collaboration between CAG and Ballet BC recognizes the distinctive contribution each of us brings to the project, making the whole much bigger than the sum of its constituent parts. Our supporters are a major part of this, extending that partnership into a broader sense of sharing and building a real community involvement in this dynamic venture.

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John Wood & Paul Harrison - CAG/Ballet BC: Build a unique art/dance commission


Shimabuku
When Sky Was Sea
November 21, 2014 to January 11, 2015
B.C. Binning and Alvin Balkind Galleries

The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the first large-scale survey exhibition in North America of work by renowned Japanese artist Shimabuku. Demonstrating the breadth of the artist’s practice, works revealed an essential correspondence to things elsewhere in a wider world, insisting on our grasp of the continuity that exists between art and (non-art) life. As he travels the world, interacting with strangers, and conversing with nature, Shimabuku instigates moments of poetry, humour and surprise.

Including pieces dating back to the mid-1990s, when he first emerged as an artist in Japan, through to presenting a wide variety of more recent work for which he has since become internationally celebrated, the exhibition exemplifies an extraordinary curiosity and freedom of expression. Shimabuku uses installation, video, photography, drawings, sculpture and events alike to convey his intense fascination with the natural world—equally the animal and vegetable realms—and the countless manifestations of human culture within it. His artistic proposition is essentially one of storytelling and discovery. He encourages us to assume an “alien” identity whereby we break with established habits of perception and enjoy experiences as if they are happening to us for the first time.

From the beginning, incongruity has characterised much of Shimabuku’s work, seen in early performances such as Tour of Europe with One Eyebrow Shaved (1991) or Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere (1994), the gentle surrealism of the works is compelling. Shimabuku is not so interested in discovering the reasons why, instead preoccupied, through a joyful approach, with unions of myth or mystery and the everyday. This is epitomized by Something that Floats / Something that Sinks (2008), a work through which the artist draws our attention to the fact that some pieces of fruit and vegetables float in water or appear to swim, while others sink. It is wonderful and ostensibly miraculous.

The inversion of the way things are conventionally seen to be is crucial to Shimabuku’s practice. He is interested in what is normal being made strange and often picks up the theme of the journey in his work, the means by which difference occurs through translation in both time and space. The photograph Cucumber Journey (2000) commemorates a two week performance travelling slowly north on British canals while learning to pickle vegetables. He has stated, “I think cooking and art are similar. They are both about unexpected meetings of far-away ingredients, to create something delicious, something good”. In his video Then, I decided to give a tour of Tokyo to the octopus from Akashi (2000) we see him with an octopus in a fishtank taking a Shinkansen train to Tokyo. There they make touristic visits to the Tokyo Tower and the famous Tsukiji fish market before getting back on the train for a return trip so that the octopus can be submerged again, back home in the Akashi Sea. The artist refers to this work as his Apollo project, involving as it did an adventure far from the natural habitat of the octopus – the fishtank being the equivalent of a spacecraft – isolated from the surrounding atmosphere so that the octopus could survive its voyage into unfamiliarity. We easily imagine how weird our world must have seemed to the octopus whilst being reminded of how “wonderful” such a creature is from our point of view.

The involvement of others, not only in the consumption but also the production of his work, marks Shimabuku out as a major figure in the recent development of relational art practice. He has produced many events, interventions and performances that are very open to audiences, to the point that they become active participants. When the Earth Turned to Sea (2002) requires dozens of volunteers to fly Chinese fish kites, the result is a shoal of fish in the sky – or a flock of fish – and so the world is turned upside down. Passing through the rubber band (2000), similarly invites gallery visitors to step through the stretching loops, a simple act of fun and wonder via the most modest of means, as in all of his works the marvellous emerges from the mundane.

The exhibition is complementary to and produced in partnership with Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK and Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland.

Shimabuku (1969, born in Kobe, Japan) lives and works in Berlin. Selected solo exhibitions include: Sea and Flowers, Barbara Wien Wilma Lukatsch, Berlin; City in the sea, Air de Paris, Paris; Flying Me, Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Something that Floats/Something that Sinks, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK and Noto, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan (2013); Leaves Swim, Nogueras Blanchard, Barcelona, Spain (2012); Man should try to avoid contact with alien life forms, Centre international d’art et du paysage de l’Île de Vassivière, Vassivière, France; On the water, CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (2011); The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (2009); DAAD galerie, Berlin; Wilkinson Gallery (2007); Swansea Jack Memorial Dog Swimming Competition, Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea (2003); Then, I Decided To Give a Tour of Tokyo To the Octopus From Akashi, Galerie Yvon Lambert, Paris (2002); America, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan (1994).

He has participated in several group exhibitions including: The Great Acceleration, Taipei Biennial , Taipei Fine Arts Museum (2014);  Aquatopia, Tate St. Ives and Nottingham Contemporary, UK; Re: emerge, Sharjah Biennial 11, UAE (2013); Mount Fuji does not exist, Frac Île de France – Le Plateau, Paris (2012); Impossible Community, Moscow Museum of Modern Art; Kaza Ana/Air Hole: Another Conceptualism from Asia, The National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan; International Triennale of Contemporary Art, Yokohama (2011); Eating the Universe: Food in Art, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Germany (2009); Between Art and Life, Centre d’Art Contemporain, Genève, Switzerland; Experimenta FOLKLORE, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Germany (2008); Beautiful New World: Contemporary Visual Culture from Japan, Long March Project, Beijing, China; How to live together, MAC: Museo de Arte, Belo Horizonte, Brazil (2007); How to live together, 27th Bienal de São Paulo; Berlin-Tokyo Tokyo-Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; International 06, Liverpool Biennial, Liverpool (2006); Expat-Art Centre, ICA, London + Musee de Art Contemporain, Lyon, France (2004); Utopia Station, 50th Venice Biennale, Venice (2003); Facts of Life, Hayward Gallery, London (2001); Elysian Fields, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (2000); Space, Witte de With, Rotterdam (1999);  Everyday, 11th Biennale of Sydney, Australia (1998).  Shimabuku is represented by NoguerasBlanchard Gallery, Barcelona and Madrid; Air de Paris galerie de’art contemporain, Paris and Barbara Wien Wilma Lukatsch Gallery, Berlin.

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Shimabuku - When Sky Was Sea


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents an ambitious new neon commission across our building façade with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, as part of a larger partnership of presentations, performances and events with British artist Tim Etchells. Arguably best known for his work with Forced Entertainment, Etchells has developed his own practice as an artist outside of their ground-breaking performances, his solo work is diverse, moving from a base in performance into visual art and fiction. Through writing, producing neon, video and text, collaborations with the photographer Hugo Glendinning on photographic work, and performance projects with an ever-expanding group of artists from around the world, including Franko B and Vlatka Horvat, Etchells opens up new possibilities to approach related ideas via different routes by working across these different media and contexts.

In all aspects of his practice Etchells is often concerned with live-ness and presence, with the unfolding of events in time and place. The site where things happen could be an LCD monitor or a computer screen, a stage, the space of a page, a gallery, a found location, a street, or some private space — a room or a car for instance — in which a person might listen to the radio or read a text. Who Knows is typical of Etchells’ approach in that something happens — there is an encounter, a process, the unfolding of an event and its implications, and an exploration of the dynamic relationship between the work and the viewer. Who Knows reveals a fascination with rules and systems in language and in culture, in the way these structures are both productive and constraining. Individual phrases of ‘I know’, ‘You know’, ‘We know’, ‘They know’, produces a playfully paranoid flavour, yet a tone that takes on something of the surveillance, snooping, watching topic, that’s even more on our minds since the information leaked by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden in May of last year. Through the repetition of phrases, the text stages or implies an event or an idea that is at once unravelled and assembled. The mechanisms and economies of this process — of exposure and concealment, construction and deconstruction, appearance and disappearance — are at the heart of what Etchells does.

In addition to this installation we co-present a series of performances — The Quiet Volume with Ant Hampton and Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First with Jim Fletcher — and public talks involving Etchells detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. Collectively these form our hosting of Tim Etchells as PuSh Festival 2014 artist-in-residence. Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, Vancouver.

Born in 1962, Tim Etchells is based in Sheffield and London, UK and is the artistic director of Forced Entertainment, a theatre company founded in 1984. With Forced Entertainment he has directed, written, and occasionally performed in, dozens of critically acclaimed performance works that have been shown at major festivals and theatres around the world.

Recent solo exhibitions include Sketch and Butchers (both London); Netherlands Media Art Institute and de Appel, Amsterdam; Void Spaces, Site Gallery, Sheffield; Sparwasser HQ, Berlin; Art Sheffield 2008; ArtFutures, Bloomberg SPACE, London; Exit Art, New York; Kunsthaus Graz; Manifesta 7, Rovereto, Italy; Acts of Voicing, Württembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart; Aichi Triennale, Aichi Arts Center, Nagoya and Lonely at the Top: Modern Dialect, MuHKA, Antwerp. Etchells co-curated and commissioned work in the Performing Sculpture section of the DLA Piper series This is Sculpture at Tate Liverpool (2009) and took part in the Gothenburg International Biennale, What a Wonderful World; After Architecture, CASM, Arts Santa Mònica, Barcelona and The Malady of Writing, MACBA, Barcelona in 2009. His books include a critical exploration of contemporary performance and theatre as well as an introduction to his work with Forced Entertainment titled Certain Fragments (Routledge, 1999), a book of short stories, Endland Stories (Pulp Books, 1998), an ironic dream dictionary, The Dream Dictionary for the Modern Dreamer (Duckworth, 2004), and a novel titled The Broken World (Windmill, 2009).

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Tim Etchells - Who Knows - PuSh Festival Artist-In-Residence 2014


What stories simmer just beneath the surface of the public spaces that we dwell in? What characters are the strangers we
brush shoulders with? What characters are we? Argentinean artist Mariano Pensotti’s ingeniously voyeuristic work Sometimes I think, I can see you places writers in public spaces and uses them as literary surveillance cameras. Over the three weekends of the 2013 PuSh Festival, a group of Vancouver writers including Michael Turner, Lisa C. Ravensbergen, Adrienne Wong, Kay Slater, Charles Demers, Anakana Schofield, OZ and Caitlin Chaisson, were stationed in the lobby of the Vancouver Art Gallery and the atrium of the Vancouver Public Library Central Branch equipped with laptops connected to projection screens. Their directive? To write a live account of whatever it is they saw — or imagine they saw — in these urban surroundings. Through the eyes and minds of these various writers, speculations unfolded, narratives were woven, and the anonymous individuals around us became implicated in a series of beautifully spontaneous fictions.

Mariano Pensotti is known internationally as one of the foremost directors in contemporary theatre. His work El pasado es un animal grotesco was presented on a revolving stage in the Fei and Milton Wong Experimental Theatre at PuSh, and his work La Marea presented outdoors in the streets of Gastown at PuSh 2011.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, The Playwrights Theatre Centre and Vancouver Art Gallery, and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

Produced with Ciudades Paralelas, a co-production between HAU Berlin and Schauspielhaus Zürich, in collaboration with Goethe-Institute Warschau and Teatr Nowy.

January 18-20, January 25-27 and February 1-3, 12-4 pm.

Located at the Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch Atrium and Vancouver Art Gallery, Lobby.

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Mariano Pensotti - Sometimes I think, I can see you


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the Canadian premiere of two new films, by British artist Andrew Cross.

The Solo features Carl Palmer, legendary rock drummer of the 1970s supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, performing a series of specially composed drum solos in a work that explores the relationship between drummer and drum kit. The film examines different aspects of percussion, with the solo snare drum giving way to brushes, cymbals, hands, felt beaters, and finally a full drum kit solo. Through a process of rigorous editing, sequences of tightly framed images are constructed; Cross’ minimalist style giving rise to a consideration of the shifting nature of cultural value.

Ensemble is Cross’s latest collaboration with 1970s progressive rock musicians, focusing on a group once dubbed Europe’s biggest cult band: The Enid. Throughout their 36 year checkered history, The Enid have both captivated and confounded audiences, always defying clear categorization. In this characteristically restrained film—contradicting the conventions of the “rock-umentary” with the unlikeliest of rock stars—Cross presents an intimate portrait of enigmatic founder Robert John Godfrey together with current band members at their studio and collective home in Northampton, England, and their recent concert with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

In partnership with PuSh Festival and SFU Woodward’s.

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Andrew Cross - The Solo & Ensemble


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the premiere of The Pixelated Revolution a new performance by Lebanese actor, director, and playwright Rabih Mroué. Mroué’s storytelling pits facts against propaganda imbued with a particular sense of humour and a visual sensibility. By means of a semi-documentary style of theatre, his often-controversial work draws attention to issues and events overlooked in the current political climate of the Middle East. Taking the form of a lecture-performance about the usage of mobile phones during the Syrian revolution, The Pixelated Revolution examines the contemporary and recent phenomenon of photographs made during such events of conflict, broadcast and shared via Facebook and other virtual communication tools, as a means to direct and communicate events to the world.

Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and grunt gallery.

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Rabih Mroué - The Pixelated Revolution


Looking for a Missing Employee is a thoughtful and provocative performance puzzle in which Mroué follows the true story of a man who disappears from his low-level post at the Ministry of Finance in Beirut, never to be seen again. Merging storytelling with live sketching, the artist takes us on a perplexing search for the ‘truth’, littered with a sea of documents, clippings, photos and found objects. The material accumulates under multi-camera live feeds as we are exposed to the ways media shapes public perception, rumours, accusations, political conflicts and scandals. What unfolds is a commentary on the phenomenon of disappearance and proof that “between the truth and a lie, there is but a hair.”

Supported by The Roundhouse. Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and grunt gallery. This tour is made possible through the collaboration of P.S. 122 (New York), On the Boards (Seattle), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis) and The Andy Warhol Museum (Pittsburgh).

Rabih Mroué, Looking for a Missing Employee
The Roundhouse, January 26–28, 8pm
Post-show discussion led by Vanessa Kwan, January 27

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Rabih Mroué - Looking for a Missing Employee


A Way To Go was the first part of the “GPS PROJECT” generated through the Education Program of Contemporary Art Gallery.

The word “Alley” comes from the original French root word “Allée” which literally translates as; A Way To Go. This was a walking journey project that consisted of using the GPS mobile device to navigate an alternative route through the downtown core by only taking alleyways and shortcuts. The passage was less distracting than crowded streets and avoided being a target for consumers by staying off the main roads. These routes are named after brief encounters with objects and/or subjects found in each individual alleyway rather than being named after important political figures or national historical references like most main roads in Vancouver. The names of the alley were included in the GPS map application. Through this journey, the participants came across site-specific installations, images activated by the GPS device, video clips and information about hidden spaces in the back alley.

Examples of this were images taken from inside an abandoned Japanese Auto Centre that has no access to the general public. Also an installation that was installed behind the fenced up corner in an underground parking lot to prevent homeless over-night staying, another example were details about a recycled water container underneath the Emery Barnes Park. This project continued to unfold describing more hidden objects/subjects in the allies of Vancouver’s downtown core over the following 3 months.

This program is generously supported by TELUS, 2010 Legacies Now and the Canadian Art Foundation. With thanks to Hannah Hughes and Autobox.

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Ron Tran - A Way To Go


For over 25 years, FASTWÜRMS, a collaborative art team formed in 1979 by Kim Kozzi and Dai Skuse, have been durable generators of DIY culture in Toronto and have been able to maintain a diverse and dedicated audience, and a distinct lineage of imitators and followers. They have built a practice that collides the rigour of conceptual art with pagan rituals and popular aesthetics, creating a fresh language of their own where they are alien witches who make films, video, installations, performances and teach at the University of Guelph, Ontario. With a sobering humor and a love of their community they have produced large public commissions and participated in the 2006 Sao Paulo Biennial. FASTWÜRMS have produced solo projects in Toronto’s many Queen Street West galleries and spaces, including Paul Petro Contemporary Art, X Space, the Gladstone Hotel, the late ZsaZsa Gallery, as well as internationally, including Southern Exposure Gallery (San Francisco), Osaka 90 (Osaka, Japan), Canadian Cultural Centre (Rome), Seoul Museum of Contemporary Art (Korea), Ideal Copy Office (Kyoto, Japan), and in La IV Bienalle de Poesia Visual (Zapata Subway Station, Mexico City).

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FASTWÜRMS - Donky@Ninja@Witch


Isabelle Pauwels is a Vancouver artist with an abiding concern about the effect of architecture on social relation. In collaboration with Vancouver’s Trapp Editions, the Contemporary Art Gallery published an artist’s bookwork by Pauwels. Unfinished Apartment for Rent details, in seven screenplays, the interaction between a series of fictitious apartment dwellers. Forced through financial constraints to assemble furniture from the walls of their individual accommodations, these renters sacrifice more and more privacy as they cannibalize their dwellings for creature comforts. Pauwel’s bookwork was displayed in an installation designed by the artist.

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Isabelle Pauwels - Unfurnished Apartment for Rent


In collaboration with the Charles H. Scott Gallery, CAG presented an exhibition of Cai Guo-Qiang, one of China’s most internationally recognized artists. His works insert traditional Chinese ideas and materials into contemporary Western idioms, contrasting the values of these disparate cultural systems. His work for the CAG began with a four-day performance in Vancouver’s Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden, an authentic full-scale classical Chinese garden. Fog machines were installed in this garden, creating a misty landscape that was painted on site by four traditional ink-brush painters. The paintings were displayed subsequently in the Binning Gallery, alongside an additional work created collaboratively by all five artists.

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Cai Guo Qiang - Performing Chinese Ink Painting


In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
Performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, CAG will host her at the Burrard Marina Field House to process the experience and produce work.

At this event, held at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, Raheem will also perform a new work in response to her time at sea.

Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and Contemporary Art Gallery.

Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union.

More information at accessgallery.ca

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In Conversation - Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips - with performance by the artist


Screening event presented by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson
Presented by CAG in partnership with Cineworks.

Friday, February 12, 7pm
Cineworks Annex, 235 Alexander Street, Vancouver

Works screened include: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

‘Missives’, is a new free broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities.

The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

Alongside this, the screening event at Cineworks Annex (February 12 from 7pm), invokes a provisional social space, cinema and theatrical set where a temporary community may gather, through which a selection of film and video works explore first person narratives, interview, account and witness in queer Canadian moving image production, and reflect upon our viewing of it in a contemporary context. Presenting older works framed through their practice the evening engages an intergenerational conversation and includes: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

The MISSIVES broadsheet and screening event are generously supported by the British Council.

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Screening | Missives


Feedback Series Events: Tad Hozumi
Saturday, June 6, 13 and 27, 4pm

Hozumi is a Vancouver-based artist and hip hop therapist, involved in local street dance culture and currently working on a body of photo, installation, social intervention and performance work that explores the history of struggle coded in to the subversive vocabulary of street style dances. Responding to the pop culture references of Julia Dault’s paintings he will curate a collection of records, on June 6 and 13 he will conduct a series of participatory movement workshops building on his selections. On June 27 Hozumi will give a talk on the practice of crate digging AKA record collecting and play a live set.

Tad Hosumi: vinyl + music blog “Back Ground Music” http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com

Tad Hozumi’s feedback events reflect his experiences as an artist, deejay and movement based therapist he will respond to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition ‘Blame It On the Rain’ by playfully referencing elements found in her work.

Hozumi has resourced his record collection in search for albums such as ‘Sweet Hone’ in the Rock’s Self-Titled; Brian Auger’s ‘Oblivion Express Live Oblivion’; Donny Hathaway’s ‘Extensions of a Man’ and Gino Soccio ‘Outline’. For Hozumi these records resonate with Dault’s work and inform the two movement based participatory events. The first class will be led by disco dancer and yoga teacher, Gary Quon. The second movement class will be based on expressive movements led by Hozumi. He will also host an artist talk and deejay an event to cap off the feedback series.

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE! Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

Feedback Talks:
This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Events: Tad Hozumi


Tim Etchells
Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First
Monday, January 20  , 7 pm, by donation
The Fox Cabaret,  ‚2321  Main Street

Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First, written and directed by Tim Etchells, is a long free-associating
monologue that tumbles from topic to topic to create a vast, failing iteration and explanation of the world. Comical in its apparent naivety and preposterously encyclopedic in scope, the piece explores the absurdity and horror of consciousness as it tries and fails to seize and define everything that it encounters. Performed by Jim Fletcher, legendary New York actor, best known for his work with Richard Maxwell’s New York City Players and Elevator Repair Service’s Gatz, the monumental, word-for- word, eight hour staging of Fitzgerald’s prose masterwork. Join us post-performance for a drink and a conversation with Jim Fletcher and Tim Etchells, hosted by Norman Armour, Artistic and Executive Director of PuSh, in the newly renovated Fox Cabaret.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

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Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First - Tim Etchells


Ant Hampton and Tim Etchells
The Quiet Volume
January 17–19,  24­–26€, 31‚, February 1– 2
12–ƒ5 pm (€…60 minutes, no intermission)
Performances every 20 minutes, last performance 4­:…ƒ05pm
Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch
3‚rd Floor, ‚ƒ… 350 West Georgia Street

In The Quiet Volume — set at the library, designed for two at a time — recorded instructions and a stack of carefully selected books direct you through this contemplative, self-generated performance. The Quiet Volume takes what is considered a deeply personal and internal process and pushes it out into the surrounding environment so that one reader’s sphere collides with another’s. It exposes the particular tension common to libraries worldwide: a combination of silence and concentration within which different peoples’ experiences of reading unfold. In this performance, you and your co-reader/fellow audience member study printed words, conjure mental images, examine the act of reading in a new light in this surprising piece of ‘autoteatro.’ For the bibliophile and reluctant reader alike, The Quiet Volume exposes the strange magic at the heart of the reading experience.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

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The Quiet Volume - Ant Hampton & Tim Etchells


A CAG video featuring Keg de Souza, Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence, she discusses her projects made during her residency earlier this year. Watch out for Keg’s return for a follow up project in July.

Keg de Souza
July 20 to August 3, 2015
Australian artist de Souza continues work towards a series of public events in 2016 exploring food culture as a metaphor for urban displacement. In April, de Souza’s handmade inflatable dome became a temporary space at the Burrard Marina Field House for a public picnic engaging Canadian colonial narratives via a consideration of national food traditions. Meeting with local chefs, food activists and residents de Souza prepared a truly Canadian feast as a source for an afternoon of unfolding dialogue that the artist mapped directly onto the inflatable’s flooring. A starting point for the discussion was the ephemerality of the event itself — the only remnant left behind an intertwining of disconnected dialogues, mapped together with dirty dishes, crumbs and more questions posed. After the meal was eaten the structure deflated, the temporary community dispersed. De Souza will be hosting a second event in July, continuing to use food as an avenue to discuss local spatial politics.

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Video | Keg de Souza


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented a weekend of epic sound working with Vancouver based NURSE. Performing two six-hour presentations, this group of tonal alchemists created free improvisational music or Free-Continuum Music. The performances were ongoing throughout the day, the sound reacting to and in response to the environment as it unfolds over time, a constantly evolving texture throughout the building.

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NURSE | Performance


Jürgen Partenheimer
Thursday, May 8, 6pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

This special event involves multiple voices approaching notions of abstraction from a variety of poetic, philosophical and theoretical standpoints by Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence Jürgen Partenheimer. Born in Munich in 1947, Partenheimer studied the theory and practice of art in Germany, the USA, Mexico and France. As a representative of a subjective abstraction, he is considered one of the most important contemporary artists of Germany. With theory, poetry and prose as his referential grammar for artistic expression, Partenheimer’s work encompasses painting, drawing, sculpture and text. Marked by a post-minimalist background and a poetic intensity, his art has been referred to as metaphysical realism. He became internationally renowned following his participation in the Paris, Venice and São Paulo Biennials, and in 2000 became the first contemporary German artist to have a retrospective in China at the National Museum of Art in Beijing. His work has been part of major exhibitions including The Museum of Modern Art in New York and San Francisco, the Miró Foundation in Barcelona and the Museum Ludwig in Cologne.

Featuring guest appearances by Nigel Prince, Nicholas Lea, Mayko Nguyen and Aoife MacNamara.

Partenheimer’s work has received many national and international prizes and awards, among others the Art Critics’ Prize of Madrid, Spain; the NEA Grant, National Endowment of the Arts, New York; Canada Council Grant, Montréal and the Federal Cross of Merit of Germany for outstanding international achievement. Partenheimer has taught as Professor, Distinguished Visiting Professor and Visiting artist among others at San Francisco Art Institute; Academy of Fine Arts, Düsseldorf, University of California at Davis; Rijks Academy in Amsterdam; Royal College of Art, Edinburgh; Rhode Island School of Design and WITS School of Arts in Johannesburg.

Partenheimer’s residency at Emily Carr takes place from February – May, 2014 in preparation for an exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery in the fall of 2014. The exhibition in Vancouver forms part of an open cooperation with the Pinakothek der Moderne München (The Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Munich); Falckenberg Collection, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg and the Gemeentemuseum The Hague, exploring site and space-related installation concepts. Parallel to the different exhibitions, all of which will be held in 2014, the participating institutions closely worked on a publication with the artist that aims at commenting on and integrating the various aspects of his work as an additional ‘fifth room’. International authors from a variety of different disciplines, including Anne Carson, Lebogang Mashile, Carla Schulz-Hoffmann, Antje v. Graevenitz, John Burnside, Oswald Egger and Rudi Fuchs, have taken up the invitation to write contributions and become involved in this project. Published by Distanz Publishers, Berlin, 2014.

Established in 2012, the Audain Distinguished Artist in Residence Program has a mandate to bring nationally and internationally renowned contemporary artists to Vancouver, create curriculum specific to each individual visiting artist, and support the creation of new works. Adopting a flexible model that encourages experimentation, collaboration, dialogue and engagement, the program will benefit artists, the academic community, the Vancouver art community at large, and will greatly contribute to Vancouver’s stature within the international art world. The Program, housed within the Audain School of Visual Arts encompassing the Faculty of Visual Arts + Material Practice, provides support for two artists per year to live and work in Vancouver for a one to three month period, and includes living and travel expenses, support for production costs, exhibitions and honoraria.

Please note that Aoife MacNamara’s reading has been removed due to technical difficulties. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenient.

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Video | Jürgen Partenheimer - Renga: Dimensions of Abstraction


Dhrupad vocalist Harkeerat Mangat and Tabla drummer Sunny Matharu performed at the Burrard Marina Field House, Vancouver, Wednesday August 14. The occasion was a launch for the 2013 Summer issue of FUSE magazine.

Images by Maria Fedorova.
Sound by Phil Dion.

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Harkeerat Mangat & Sunny Matharu - Perform Live at the Field House


Camille Norment and Experimental Music UnitSongs for Glass Island, was presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, at Pyatt Hall, VSO School of Music. It was an engaging, performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Norment collaborating with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

It is intriguing that their collaborative sonic exploration departed from Robert Smithson’s unrealized earthwork project for Southwest BC, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass), proposed shortly before he created the famous (or is it infamous?) Spiral Jetty. Smithson’s project to cover an islet in the Strait of Georgia with crushed glass was drowned by the noisy objections of environmentalists, yet it’s echoes live on through a completely different type of (sonic) exploration. So, how does one project live through the failure of another?

A highlight of Norment and EMU’s event was our introduction to the glass armonica, a rare and legendary instrument dating back to the eighteenth century that uses glass, water and fingertips to create otherworldly sounds. These tuned glass “singing bowls” reputedly have healing properties, leading to reactions from the listener that vary from mesmerized to fearful, and even to a one-time ban on its use … strange but true! Mozart has even penned works for this enchanting instrument, and it’s other worldly sounds have accompanied music by contemporary musicians such as Linda Ronstadt, David Gilmour and Björk.

In an interview published in e-flux about her recent exhibition at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Norment touched on her fascination with the powers of sound: “I am interested in how music has long been used to facilitate both the forging and transgressing of cultural norms. Sound permeates all borders. Throughout history, fear has been associated with the paradoxical effects music has on the body and mind, and its power as a reward-giving de-centraliser of control.

Norment’s work has been described as visceral and poetic. From my personal perspective, much of my graduate research at SFU explores the human’s phenomenological relationship with the world, how our sensual experience with the surrounding environment plays a key role in defining who, and what, we are. Moreover, from an aural perspective, it is important to recognize that our location in the sonic environment is critical to our understanding and perception of it. I enjoyed exploring both of these concepts, and more, at Norment’s and EMU’s concert, immersing myself into the spellbinding soundscape.

– Jorma Kujala

Songs for Glass Island was presented by the CAG in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Tuning Into Other Worlds


Locations of the broadsheet boxes to pick up a free copy of MISSIVES. Created by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson, produced and presented by Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. The broadsheet publication and screening project is supported by The British Council.

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MISSIVES broadsheet box locations – Vancouver & Toronto


After much anticipation, Mungo Thomson makes his return to the CAG with his solo exhibition, Time, People, Money, Crickets, opening this Friday. The team has been hard at work preparing for the show. Now that it is down to the last few days of the install, I talked to programs assistant Jas Lally to find out about the challenges they have faced and the exciting things that will be occurring over the next month.

Because of the multitude of mediums explored by Mungo, from sculpture to performance to film and sound, the preparation has been unique. “When we install the works we have to be careful about the TIME mirror pieces in particular, because they  weigh about 100 pounds each, so they’re quite heavy,” Jas said. “We’ll have to be careful with the projection of the rolodex film as well.” Untitled (Margo Leavin Gallery 1970-)(2009) is a stop-motion 16mm film. “I am very excited to work with a 16mm projector again after Jeremy Shaw’s exhibition earlier this year” Jas added.

All of the pieces have been shipped from SITE Santa Fe, who the CAG is collaborating with to present this exhibition. The only issue was a slight hold up at the border. “You have to be prepared for delays in customs clearance,” Jas mentioned. “Once you speak to the agent and explain that it is artwork, it works out.” Thankfully, they are here in perfect shape and being hung up/suspended/tested/configured for Friday evening.

Jas mentioned that she is looking forward to Void and Observer (2013-2015). “Hopefully the viewer will read the label and go, ‘Hey, where’s this piece?’ I think the mis -marked coin will be the most unique and the most interactive piece.” The front desk staff might just have the answer.

Mungo’s Crickets (2012-2013), which one will be able to see, hear and read in the large gallery room, will also be performed live on the night of the opening. “We collaborated with Vancouver New Music to have four musicians perform the piece in neighbouring Emery Barnes Park,” Jas smiled, “The musicians will essentially be playing the role of  crickets. That will be fun.” This work definitely defines the show, being presented in live performance, video, sound and debossed score during the course of the exhibition.

Jas also organized a feedback talk around Crickets on July 28 with speakers Murray Isman, Professor of Applied Biology from UBC; Lucas Abela, a performance artist and Giorgio Magnanensi, Artistic Director of Vancouver New Music. “It’s really about getting something different and taking a chance. I hope the speakers will be able to engage with their personal experiences and reflect upon the piece,” Jas explained her unexpected choice of participants. “I believe that it’s important to bring in different perspectives so that the viewer has a more engaged experience.” We can’t wait to hear what the speakers have to say.

Finally, Jas expounded why we should all be looking forward to Mungo’s show. “Well, it’s Mungo! He’s been really great to work with and you can see how invested he is in his work.  It is going to be interesting to see how all the works come together in relation to each other, the everyday life, the wider historical contexts and the cosmic scale. I am most excited to see how the interactive aspects of the exhibition work out whereby the public are no longer just the audience, but participants.”

Join us this Friday, June 10 at 7pm for the opening, and head over to Emery Barnes Park at 8:30pm for the live performance of Cricket Solos for Clarinet, Piccolo, Percussion and Violin. Don’t miss the Feedback Talk on July 28, either! 

– Kelli Sturkenboom

 

 

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Behind the Scenes on Time, People, Money, Crickets


Tad Hozumi reflects on his first feedback series event for the CAG responding to the paintings by Julia Dault:

The first workshop of the feedback series, Yoga Boogie, started with an introspective meditation and a series of ‘quieter’ postures.

Workshop leader, Gary Quon picked out some beautiful songs, particularly Donny Hathaway’s I Love the lord He Heard My Cry Part One & Two, setting the tone for the workshop that was at times amusing and energetic but always grounded by an earthy and soulful spirituality.

It is very common for yoga classes to use music to set a mood, but here there was something new added, with Quon’s dedication to his craft as a dancer shining through. The climax of the workshop was a soul train to Gino Soccio’s Dancer. He really got everyone sweating! It was great to see Shaun work up a sweat, especially as he admitted before the class that he actually kind of hated yoga.

In fact, I kind of hated yoga as well, till recently. I thought of it as an inane repackaging of what was a serious introspective Eastern discipline. Kind of the spiritual equivalent of bad miso soup. I have met some great practitioners lately though, that seem to connect to the practice in a way that I can vibe with. Quon is definitely one of those people.

The session closed with meditation to Donny Hathaway’s Someday We’ll All Be Free and Sweet Honey in the Rock’s song, Sweet Honey in the Rock. Somewhere between gospel and Eastern wisdom we found a sense of quiet content.

On Saturday June 13 was my own Body Jazz workshop. I brought my street dancer skills to anchor the session that was designed to be both inviting to everyone and still be quite experimental. We connected to the rhythms in Dault’s works. If I can make a sweeping and general statement, I think abstraction in general has a funny place in art history. Its often kind of seen as the beginnings of an intellectualized approach to art but really when you look at the practice it is far from it.

In his introduction to Art Life, Lawrence Rinder writes about how Agnes Martin’s minimal and abstract works are always referred to as a link in art history between abstract expressionism and minimalism but never as a tool for meditation. I vibe with that. I like to think of artworks as tools as well. To that end we were channeling Dault’s works and the records I curated from her exhibition to explore our own potential as embodied beings.

My final session will be an artist talk and DJ session on Saturday, June 27 at 4pm, please join me then!

– Tad Hozumi

 

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Tad Hozumi meditates on ‘Yoga Boogie’


Hello! My name is Shalon Webber-Heffernan, and this Summer I am super excited to be working and learning at the CAG!

I’m very happy to be working alongside CAG Curator Shaun Dacey in the role of Summer Learning Assistant, and I look forward to getting to know all the staff and volunteers at the gallery. I’m equally excited to be working with some of this Summer’s amazing Burrard Marina Field House Studio residency artists, including Maddie Leach, Keg de Souza, Walter Scott, Sameer Farooq, Harrell Fletcher and Marie Lorenz. Aside from the CAG, I am currently working towards my Master’s Degree in Cultural Studies at Queen’s University where I focus on embodied and affective knowledge, performance studies, and the so-called “pedagogical turn” in contemporary art practices.

My background is in performance, dance and theatre paired with years of experience working within community outreach settings has me thinking deeply about genuinely engaged arts praxis—what that means, and what are the implications—as well as experiential and alternate (un)learning processes and methodologies.

At the summer’s end I am lucky also to be working with international performance troupe La Pocha Nostra, where I will deepen my studies of radical performance pedagogy during an immersive training program in Tijuana, Mexico.

I look forward to seeing you around the CAG this summer!

– Shalon

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Hello from Shalon! Summer Learning Assistant


The CAG has invited artist, deejay and movement based therapist Tad Hozumi to create a series of feedback events and workshops in response to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition Blame It On the Rain.

His upcoming series of music and movement workshops and events will playfully reference elements found in her work.

Here Hozumi writes, the first in a series of blog reports, about his work and about preparing for the events and workshops:

Last weekend I installed a listening station for a selection of funk and disco vinyl records in the CAG bookshop (see above image). This listening station is part of my feedback response to the current exhibition: Julia Dault’s Blame It On the Rain. My initial task was to curate a selection of records that responded to Dault’s works and that served as the inspiration for a series of workshops. The curatorial method I undertook was really simple: Rhythms x Patterns x Geometry x Materials. Dault’s eye is similar to that of a crate-digger, she is constantly scanning the visible ‘debris’ in our environment for moments of resonance.

Crate-digging, if I can give the most romantic definition, is the practice of scouring through dusty bins of long forgotten music to unearth rare or special records. There are a lot of great crate-diggers out there, including Japan’s DJ Muro or Vancouver’s own Sipreano, who recently released Native North America Vol. 1 – Aboriginal Folk, Rock, And Country 1966–1985, a project that I am sure will go down as something of historical importance in our time.

Not all crate-diggers have an active public life, deejay or compile music. If I had to guess most are actually very private, sharing their collections with a few people who are willing to bear them in order to get a sneak peak at an unknown gem. There is one thing I am pretty sure of, digging while mysterious, certainly is not glamorous.

As a crate-digger, I’m just a baby. It’s exciting, because almost everything I come across is new to me. Perusing bins at a thrift shop will almost always turn up some new discoveries. I used to think I had a pretty good handle on music. I was wrong. I think the current statistic is that over 80% of recorded music on vinyl is unavailable digitally. So crate-digging can expand the musical world you live in quite a bit.

The record in the above picture (click on the arrow for the slideshow) is Outline – Gino Soccio. A really top notch Montreal disco record. It was actually one of  first five records I randomly bought in a thrift store. Man, I was happy when I first heard the slick beat on Dancer. Somehow I felt like this omniscient being who could magically discover dope records. Being able to visually locate the sensibility of an album without any audio information is a big part of crate-digging.

After I bought Soccio’s album, when I was about 1,000 records deep in to my collection, I realized that the album was pretty common. A great album for sure, but not necessarily a spectacular or rare find that I thought I had made. I now have three copies of Outline and a 7” of Dancer. Still, I have a lot of emotions attached to Soccio’s first release.

Any ways, you can listen here to Dancer. A real classic. Thumping.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3y2C8jqG8Q

Other albums selected for this project are:

Extensions of a Man
– Donny Hathaway
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9Uydcm0CgQ

Encounters Of Every Kind – Meco
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kvFGFbA6LI

Sweet honey: in the rock (Self-Titled)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pQW95XPmCY

A Fifth of Beethoven – Walter Murphy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y67xr124DC4

Live Oblivion – Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGa8SCTKXsA

I hope you will come by the CAG and enjoy listening to the above records in person

This is my music + vinyl blog.
http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com/

– Tad Hozumi

__________

Join Tad Hozumi at these upcoming feedback events: 

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE!
Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

 

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‘Crate-digging for Julia Dault’ by Tad Hozumi


 

We are very excited to launch and follow the progress of our Kickstarter campaign for a new partnership commission with Ballet BC and artists Wood & Harrison. Since launching last week we have 12 initial backers and lots of press on the project.

Click below to read what they are saying about us!

http://www.straight.com/blogra/783156/ballet-bc-and-brit-artists-launch-project-kickstarter

http://blogs.vancouversun.com/2014/12/03/art-basel-chooses-contemporary-art-gallery-project-for-crowdfunding/

More on the project….

The CAG and Ballet BC in association with the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative are excited to announce a new project.

For our project, selected by independent jury for Art|Basel’s curated page on Kickstarter, we are commissioning visual artists John Wood and Paul Harrison to team with the renowned dancers of Ballet BC, to produce a collaborative cross-disciplinary performance combining the very best in both contemporary dance and visual art.

The funds will be used to bring the visual artists to Vancouver for an intensive development period during spring and fall 2015 with the premiere in 2016.

The collaboration between CAG and Ballet BC recognizes the distinctive contribution each of us brings to the project, making the whole much bigger than the sum of its constituent parts. Our supporters are a major part of this, extending that partnership into a broader sense of sharing and building a real community involvement in this dynamic venture.

The cost of developing and producing such a commission can often be prohibitive despite the strength of idea and partners involved. While accessing of funds for the actual production and performances in 2016 provides many openings, the research phase is where we need help now. We need assistance in supporting the artists’ commissioning fees and expenses in order to get the project started.

We need to bring the artists to Vancouver for the research/development phase, an initial one week orientation and introduction in April-May 2015 where ideas can be discussed and meetings made, to be followed by a second two week intensive period developing the project through a series of rehearsals and workshops.

The completed work will receive its premiere in Vancouver in 2016 and then have potential to be presented on tour.

The artists

Since Wood and Harrison’s first collaboration in 1993, their work has evolved from single shot ‘studies’ filmed against neutral backgrounds to longer pieces in which a sequence of actions unfold within constructed locations that have more implicit meaning and contribute to greater narrative complexity. Pieces maintain a strict internal logic, with the action directly related to the duration of the work. Inside this ‘logical world’ action is allowed to happen for no apparent reason, tensions build between the environment and its inhabitant, play is encouraged and the influences on the work are intentionally mixed.

Why should you support it?

This cross-disciplinary approach to contemporary culture signals an ambitious attempt to join together in the production of what will be a major new work, combining great opportunities for artists and audiences alike. This project will be a first for all involved, marking a significant and transformative partnership between each institution as well as an exciting and key opportunity for all artists. For Wood and Harrison, despite their work often being written about in relation to contemporary dance, it will be the first time they have ever worked toward a live performance.

– Jill Henderson

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Help us build a unique art-dance commission


Over the course of ten weeks, the Contemporary Art Gallery brought together eleven emerging artists: Anne Riley, Charlotte Newman, Hannah Axen, Kelly McInnes, Kristina Jaggard, Lexi Vajda, Maia Nichols, Matilda Cobanli, Natalie Tin Yin Gan, Ryan Genoe, Sophia Wolfe to explore the intersection between dance, choreography and visual art in our inaugural Summer Intensive. Working with mentors: Justine Chambers, Delia Brett, Daelik and Burrard Marina Field House Studio resident Brendan Fernandes the group participated in studio visits, gallery tours, performance workshops and seminars throughout the summer. This culminated in the production of a one evening installation/durational performance work titled 600 Campbell, at the Russian Hall on September 10.

Considering the absence and presence of objects and bodies, the group developed a series of performances and installations examining ways in which each piece intersects with another, connecting the work, the audience and the space. The artists collaborate to presented the viewer with an invitation for interaction, allowing them to influence the work and the space both as observers and active contributors. The evening was a huge success with well over a hundred people stopping by throughout the night participating in the various performances ranging from audio works and overhead projector performance to a durational chair performance in the main auditorium. Check out the pics!

We are working on a video of the evening we will be posting soon!

We acknowledge the generous support of the British Columbia Arts Council Council Youth Engagement Program.

-Shaun Dacey

 

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600 Campbell: Summer Youth Intensive Finale


After an amazing week of talking, sharing, conceptualizing and relationship building- the Indigenous Acts Gathering has come to an end. On Friday, August 8th we hosted the participants at the Contemporary Art Gallery for a chance to share and exchange experiences, and potential “next steps” from their week together. Vancouver-based curators, directors and artists were invited to listen, share and respond to the topics and themes that surfaced over the week.

It was an opportunity for the participants to meet and hear from those involved in Vancouver galleries and urban/artistic planners from around the city and artistic community at large. Dylan Robinson and Candice Hopkins facilitated an engaging and thought provoking closing discussion that allowed for the participates to engage with each other and begin dialogues with the invited guests.

It was an honour to have been able to participate and work through topics that are owed so much attention. I look forward to seeing all of you again, and to continue to learn from your works and teachings!

– Lindsay Lachance

 

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Indigenous Acts: Art and Activism Proposal Sharing


The Contemporary Art Gallery is hosting Australian artist Keg de Souza as an up-coming Burrard Civic Marina Artist in Residence in 2015.

I have been lucky enough to spend the last few days with Keg as she begins to conceptualize her upcoming residency. Keg’s most recent works explore ideas surrounding space, place and food. These themes appear to be forming around her residency here in Vancouver. Keg has visited community centre’s and women shelters in the Downtown East Side, UBC Farms, MOA and places in-between to reflect on the use of local foods and spatial politics.

We have also learned that Keg is an amazing vegan and dairy-free cook… so we’re counting on taste testing some of her own recipes!

Check out more about Keg and her work on her blog here and stay posted to find out more about her upcoming residency.

– Lindsay Lachance

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Mapping Food in Vancouver with Keg de Souza


Recently Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Brendan Fernandes held a life drawing class at the CAG. The gallery was buzzing with over twenty-five artists and the model, Rachel Meyer, a member of Ballet BC. Fernandes worked with Rachel to create a multitude of poses on various sized plinths that highlighted her feet and encouraged participants to focus on this area.

The drawing tasks varied from 30 seconds to 5 minutes then 20 minutes poses. It was really amazing to see the range of differences in drawing style and form that everyone used to interpret Rachel’s poses. We got great feedback from the participants and we’re hoping to hold more life drawing classes at the CAG in the future.

Check out some of these amazing life drawings above and stay tuned to find out more about Brendan Fernandes residency!

– Lindsay La Chance

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Life Drawing with Brendan Fernandes: Seeing the Dancer’s Foot


This week the CAG’s Summer Dance Intensive Program attended a movement workshop run by Delia Brett and Daelik of MACHiNENOiSY Dance Society. Delia and Daelik led a workshop that taught the participants to collaborate with their instincts and movements and not to rely on verbal forms of communication.

The embodied exercises led the group to think about creation and rehearsal techniques that they can bring forward with them as they begin to conceptualize their final projects. Delia and Daelik’s teachings and exercises were really engaging and allowed for the participants to get to know each other’s practice and methods for creation.

The next workshop will be held by the CAG’s artist in residence Brendan Fernandes and Vancouver-based contemporary dance artist Justine Chambers.

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Bodies Moving in Space and Time: Summer Intensive Workshop with Delia Brett and Daelik


Last week I attended my first artist talk as the CAG’s Learning and Public Program assistant. New York and Toronto- based artist Brendan Fernandes is currently in Vancouver for a two month residency at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio.

While in residence Fernandes will be developing a new solo dance piece, co-mentoring a summer intensive youth dance program, and leading a life drawing class that focuses on the dancer’s foot. On Tuesday, June 10th Fernandes gave an artist talk at the CAG where he led us through the creation, rehearsal, and performance processes of his recent works; The Working Move (2012), Encomium (2011), and Night Shift (2011).

(Find out more about Fernandes’ past and upcoming works on his website at www.brendanfernandes.ca)

Brendan’s talk was as charming and insightful as his work, which engages with various disciplines including visual arts, dance, performance and theatre. He explained how his work focuses on corporal and embodied lived experiences—which raises questions about “liveness versus stillness”, “space and audience” and “single action versus relational action”. The focus on the body challenges us to re-examine the aesthetics of his works—how do we react as spectators when the body becomes the object, the subject, the artifact and the archive? Fernandes’ works question how we conceive the space, time and performative codes of bodies moving in gallery and museum spaces. I’m stoked to follow Fernandes’ process this summer and find out how the new projects are shaping up!

– Lindsay Lachance

Click here for: Information regarding his Youth Intensive Dance Workshop

Listen to the artist talk here:

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Brendan Fernandes Talks the Talk and Talks About the Dancer’s Walk


Brendan Fernandes, the CAG’s summer artist in residence has begun the creation process for his new work! I had the pleasure to visit Brendan during one of his rehearsals earlier this week. Fernandes talked about how he will incorporate themes of labour, the duration of time, notions of self-hood and identity into the creation of this piece.

He is challenging the notion of muscle memory and exploring ideas around the foot as a fetishized object. I’m excited to see how Fernandes will integrate notions of stillness and repetition into his piece. We will be following Fernandes’ creation and rehearsal process over the next few weeks, and stay tuned to find out details regarding his open in-progress performance.

– Lindsay Lachance

 

 

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Brendan Fernandes and ‘The Foot Stretcher’


As I mentioned in my National Aboriginal Day post I headed down to the Trout Lake Community Center to experience and participate in the fun! It was a beautiful sunny Saturday where everyone was enjoying the weather, the food, the company and the performances!

We attended the performance of Songs for Reconciliation,a part of  William Hiłamas Edward Wasden Jr‘s  residency with  The Vancouver Park Board.  Wasden Jr brought Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples together to learn, share and perform Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw cultural stories, songs and dances. The project focused on revisiting cultural histories and knowledges that emphasize the importance of creating and maintaining loving relationships within families and especially towards children. William shares cultural knowledges and histories so that the participants and the audience can reflect on the many cultural elements that have been suppressed due to the residential  school systems.

We heard songs for young boys learning to hunt, songs for infant and toddlers, and one called the duck song. The audience was encouraged to participate and sometimes the dancers would  take you by the hand to get up and dance with them!

Another part of the project allowed for the participants to make their own regalia. Each piece was handmade, generally in black or red and had an animal on the back.

This collaborative residency allowed for Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities to learn, remember, and share in Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw cultural knowledges and stories. As an Anishnaabe person I was honoured to be there, and to have shared in the performance of this work!

Meegwetch (Thank you)  William for initiating this project and for sharing your stories, songs and dances with us!

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William Wasden Jr: City of Vancouver Artist in Residence Performance


The Contemporary Art Gallery is excitingly awaiting this year’s National Aboriginal Day events! On June 21st Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Canada gather to acknowledge and celebrate the histories, knowledges and cultures of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples. Trout Lake National Aboriginal Day Organizing Committee explains:

Setting aside a day for Aboriginal Peoples is part of the wider recognition of Aboriginal Peoples’ important place within the fabric of Canada and their ongoing contributions as First Peoples. As former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson said, “It is an opportunity for all of us to celebrate our respect and admiration for First Nations, for Inuit, for Métis — for the past, the present and the future. ” (NADOC 2014).

This year’s events will take place at various venues across the city including Trout Lake Community Centre at 3360 Victoria Drive in East Vancouver. Throughout the day there will be a pancake breakfast, a community walk, dance performances, live music, storytelling, and much more! There will also be food and art vendors. At Trout Lake from 2-3pm, the performance of  Songs For Reconciliation will take place. Artist in Residence William Wasden Jr, Community members from Hillcrest, Hastings and Britannia Community Centres, UBC Learning Exchange, Britannia Elementary and Hamber Secondary share and celebrate the learning of Kwakwaka’wakw culture.

William Hiłamas Edward Wasden Jr. is ‘Namgis (Nimpkish Valley and Alert Bay Area) from the Kwakwaka’wakw “Kwakwala Speaking Nations”. William was taught traditional Kwakwaka’wakw artwork by late ‘Namgis Chief / Master Carver Pal’nakwalagalis Wakas Douglas Cranmer and also from Haida Artist Don Yeomans. He was taught singing and the traditions around ceremonial culture by the last Kwakwaka’wakw Song Keeper/Composer/Historian, the late Nakwaxda’xw Chief Hiwakalis Tom Willie “Mackenzie” from Blunden Harbour and his late wife, matriarch ‘Malidi Elsie nee Wamiss from Kingcome Inlet. William credits the survival and strength of present Kwakwaka’wakw culture and ceremonies to the teachings of dedicated Elders such as them (Songs For Reconciliation Online, 2014). William Wasden Jr’s residency in Vancouver is coming to an end, but his work with art and reconciliation continues on through the communities he has worked with.

The celebration of National Aboriginal day allows for all interested to learn, share, and enjoy traditional cultural elements like traditional dialects, song, dance, art, histories and knowledge. It is a day of celebration and community building. I can’t wait for Saturday, and hope that you make it out too!

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National Aboriginal Day 2014 Celebration


On Wednesday night, about 50 people came down to the Burrard Marina Field House at 1655 Whyte Street for the launch of the FUSE Summer 2013 issue: Survivors and Survivalists. It began in the marina’s locker room lounge with a sublime performance of traditional Indian music by artist and Dhrupad vocalist Harkeerat Mangat and Tabla drummer Sunny Matharu. Listen to the performance here.

After flipping through the fresh pages, people sauntered around the lawn and eventually upstairs for a drink of something classic or the aggressive and delicious summer punch made by FUSE Contributing Editor Amy Fung. Helen Reed rocked the upstairs patio with her awesome combination of beats that crossed decades and countries until no more dances could be danced.

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Fuse Magazine launch at the Field House


We’ve had a very eventful week here at the CAG. In Celebration of our 40th anniversary and the opening of our Current Exhibition we’ve held not one, not two, not three, but four fun events! It’s been pretty great (albiet a tad exhausting for some of our dedicated staff).

On Wednesday September 7th we held a donors preview and screen printing workshop. We were lucky enough to have thirteen of Corita Kent’s original screens to combine in any way guests pleased. Everyone was provided with preprinted cloth aprons to protect their fancy wares and Meggan Winsley from Malaspina Printmakers was on hand to help guests pull the  screens. Best of all, everyone who participated got to walk away with their very own Corita Kent inspired print.

Present as well were members of the University of British Columbia Opera. In ode to Corita’s influencial friends (Charles and Ray Eames, Buckminster Fuller, and John Cage to be counted among them), Heather Malloy and Rebecca Paulding performed two of John Cage’s lesser known songs (and by that I mean lesser known than the famous Four minutes, thirty three seconds), Number Sixteen from Song Books and Aria.

The following night welcomed a crowd for the official opening of our current Corita Kent, Thomas Bewick, and Federico Herrero exhibition. What began as a typical art opening (what does that really mean, anyways?) quickly turned into a full blown party.

Members of the UBC Opera performed for a second time, and as the lights dimed everyone loosened their shirt collars to dance to the musical stylings of DJ David Wisdom. The loading bay was tranformed into party central with cupcakes provided by Coco cupcakes, goody bags, a Corita Kent inspired stamp station, personalized crepe paper ‘hats’ for the especially festive guests, and a slideshow showing exhibition documentation from our last 40 years in operation.

The week’s events wrapped up on Saturday with Family Day. We were pleased to welcome children, big and small, to come and see the new exhibition, print t-shirts, and hold a Happening/Parade. With newly minted Corita Kent inspired shirts and banners, guests and musicians took to the streets on one of the warmest days of the summer to celebrate art and life.

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Preview, Opening, Birthday, Family Day, Oh my!


This Saturday, February 19, from 3 to 5 pm the CAG will host a special performance by Jonathan Middleton to celebrate the launch of our latest exhibition catalogue, An Invitation to An Infiltration. Middleton is a Vancouver-based artist and curator, whose practice examines the relationships between language, failure, and the structure of comedy. He is one of the artists who participated in the exhibition An Invitation to an Infiltration, which coincided with the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver. The above image shows Middleton engaged in an act of intervention, replacing the exhibition title with  his own. On Saturday Middleton will be here to sign your catalogues with fictionalicized dedications.

An Invitation to An Infiltration was guest curated by Eric Fredericksen. He invited Fia Backström, Lucy Clout, Hadley+Maxwell, Jonathan Middleton, Dexter Sinister, Holly Ward and Jordan Wolfson to participate in an exhibition that explored the potential competitive nature of group shows against the background of one of the world’s major sporting competitions.

The publication is designed by participating artist collective Dexter Sinister, edited by Jenifer Papararo and printed by Fillip. For more details see our web page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Upcoming Performance by Jonathan Middleton and Publication Launch


$50.00

Published: 08/2015
288 pages

Published by Walther König, Köln
Text by Aileen Burns, Johan Lundh, Rebecca May Marston.

Produced in collaboration with Frac Île de France — Le Plateau, Paris; Manchester Art Gallery, UK; Centre for Contemporary Art, Derry~Londonderry, Northern Ireland; OK Offenes Kulturhaus/ Center for Contemporary Art, Linz, Austria; Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, Colorado and Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. And in collaboration with Lisson Gallery, London, Milan and New York; Esther Schipper/Johnen Galerie, Berlin; gb agency, Paris; and TARO NASU, Tokyo.

The meticulously researched projects of British artist Ryan Gander (born 1976), realized in a gamut of media, have included such conceptual gestures as an invented word, a chess set, a television script and a children's book. This substantial volume surveys his diverse oeuvre.

This expansive 288 page publication is available for the special exhibition price of $50.

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Ryan Gander: Culturefield


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