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Offsite Projects

As part of our contribution to Capture, Vancouver’s first annual city-wide photography festival, we present a new installation by American artist Mungo Thomson. Central to Thomson’s artistic proposition is that of context – be it institutional, cultural or that of everyday life – and it is through the breadth of his individual works that we are prompted to grasp the many challenges to our perception in the things we encounter daily. For Thomson is interested in the space between things, the subtext or background that consistently draws our attention. He has made works which record notional ‘silence’ – the sound of a room when no one is in it, the applause between songs on every live recording by Bob Dylan – produced works in a range of media based on TIME magazine, and made interventions into spaces which causing us to re-evaluate our expectations, such as Coat Check Chimes, his contribution to the 2008 Whitney Biennial Exhibition, where Thomson  replaced the 1,200 coat hangers in the Whitney Museum’s coat check with custom-made, musically tuned coat hangers that were modeled on orchestral triangles.

When we look at the stars we are actually bathed in the light of the past, and for Thomson this is another way to think about the history while simultaneously considering the ‘contemporary’ – that which constitutes our present is a set of signals between which there are gaps. Negative Space is an ongoing series of photographic murals of inverted astronomical imagery sourced from the Hubble Space Telescope. Thomson works with the Hubble archive in an ongoing way, generating a negative image every time the Hubble generates a positive one. Through a simple command in Photoshop, blacks become whites, whites become blacks, and all other colors are transformed into their complement. These images are then made into site-specific photographic murals for empty walls and installed like wallpaper, indoors and out, temporary and permanent. The project also includes an artist book, an original font, and a screensaver.

The project at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with Capture and the Canada Line Public Art Program – IntransitBC.

This project heralds a more comprehensive exhibition of Thomson’s work to be presented at the Contemporary Art Gallery in 2014-15 produced in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe and accompanied by the first monograph to examine Thomson’s practice.

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Mungo Thomson - Negative Space


A special version of a landscape drawing, Sky at Night by Itee Pootoogook is presented large-scale at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line, its physicality altering as light changes throughout the day, its imagery deliberately playing with and gaining meaning from the specificity of the site.

A resident of Cape Dorset, Nunavut, Pootoogook belongs to a generation of Inuit artists who are transforming and reshaping the creative traditions that were successfully pioneered by their parents and grandparents during the second half of the twentieth century. In his large-scale graphite and coloured pencil drawings, Pootoogook makes images of places, people and things, observed with prosaic intimacy. The solo exhibition Buildings and Land at the Contemporary Art Gallery, focuses not on works involving portraits of family and friends but on those images that picture the things which structure daily routine in this part of Canada — buildings, landscape and the means to travel to other parts of the country.

The project is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program – IntransitBC.

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Itee Pootoogook - Sky at Night


CAG Window Spaces and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line and Fieldhouse Studio Residency Program.

In partnership with the City of Vancouver Fieldhouse Studio Residency Program, the Contemporary Art Gallery presents Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly as our inaugural resident artist. For six months he will occupy the Burrard Marina Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement, coinciding with the launch of As It Comes, two new interrelated public works. The title appears at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station as a discrete piece, humorously foreboding, and more comic than terrifying, presented in brightly coloured vinyl like a credit from a B-list horror film. Linked to the text in the gallery windows, Boisjoly removes all suggestions of the past, not to deny what has become history, but with the intent to restore belief systems that are still intact.

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Raymond Boisjoly - As It Comes


Nancy Holt is one of the leading artists of her generation and a pioneer in conceptual, site-specific art and film and video work. She is one of a group of important international artists who initiated the Land art movement in the late 1960s. The Contemporary Art Gallery brings together a selection of photographs from 1967 onwards, many seen for the first time, alongside pivotal film works.

Holt deals with themes centering on memory, perception, time and space. She uses the natural environment as both medium and subject with a focus on the cyclical time of the universe, the daily axial rotation of our planet Earth and its annual orbit around the sun. Photography has always played a central role within her work, both as a way of engaging with the landscape and as a way of documenting site-specific projects.

This exhibition includes major photographic pieces, including early work such as Concrete Visions (1967), an important project made on Dartmoor while visiting the UK with the artist Robert Smithson over forty years ago, Trail Markers (1969); a series of photographs entitled Light and Shadow Photo-Drawings (1978); and photographs by Holt of her most famous work, Sun Tunnels, 1973 – 76 among others. Vancouver itself could not be a more appropriate location for this exhibition, the city renowned for its setting within magnificent natural surroundings, the ongoing photographic legacies in picturing within international visual arts practice, and also being the site for the seminal Glue Pour (1970) by Robert Smithson, Holt’s late husband.

 

 

 

 

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Nancy Holt - Selected Photo and Film Works


Knowledge, Kindliness and Courage is the first solo exhibition in North America of Turner Prize nominee, Nathan Coley. This major presentation includes Unnamed (2012), a new commission in the gallery and We Must Cultivate Our Garden, installed on the roof of the Pennsylvania Hotel in the Downtown East Side at Carrall Street and East Hastings Street.

Presented off-site We Must Cultivate Our Garden (2006) a largescale illuminated text work held aloft on a scaffolding structure, evokes just such concerns. Taken from the last line of Candide by Voltaire, the statement is powerful and complex. The use of the plural ‘we’ is inclusive, conveying the sense that a joint effort is necessary for an endeavour to have any effect. The imperative ‘must’ lends an active, almost dictatorial tone. The words ‘cultivate’ and ‘garden’ are loaded with metaphorical weight: we can cultivate our minds, our souls, our relationships as well as the soil. Our ‘garden’ might constitute a house, a spirit, a child or a patch of land. In some ways it can be considered a call to arms, suggestive that a hunger for knowledge and understanding can be satiated through investigation and hard work rather than reliance on fate, tenuous beliefs or social standing. Coley is interested in the idea that the sentence is open to multiple forms of translation and interpretation, this element of ambiguity crucial whereby the onus is placed on the viewer to locate a meaning which interests them. Indeed, through his work, the artist reveals the unconscious of the architecture and cityscapes he interrogates, investigating social as much as physical constructions. Or as Coley says, ‘It’s in your imagination.’

 

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Nathan Coley - We Must Cultivate Our Garden


Knowledge, Kindliness and Courage is the first solo exhibition in North America of Turner Prize nominee, Nathan Coley. This major presentation includes Unnamed (2012), a new commission in the gallery and We Must Cultivate Our Garden, installed on the roof of the Pennsylvania Hotel in the Downtown East Side. Unnamed forms the centerpiece to the exhibition, over 30 recycled headstones informally gathered together, supported on stout cedar batons. These ‘ready-made’ objects produce a powerful presence resonating with Coley’s ongoing investigations as to how our environment speaks of collective desires and beliefs through its embodiment of social histories.

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Nathan Coley - Knowledge, Kindliness and Courage


WAVES by Vancouver based and French born artist Nicolas Sassoon is the second commissioned work for the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station as part of the CAG’s offsite exhibition programme. It is part of Sassoon’s ongoing body of work using Moiré patterns – a visual blur inadvertently discovered by Swiss photographer Ernst Moiré – whereby two images are overlaid to create a third ‘plane’. The resulting optical effect causes the eye to see movement where there is none.

The Moiré pattern designed for the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station is created by physical layering a symmetrical configuration of vertical, curved black lines on top of a coloured pixelated background. With no focal point the mural is activated by the movement of the viewer. As commuters pass by the two overlapping planes, horizontal waves appear to undulate rhythmically across the surface. Initially disorientating, sustained viewing creates an immersive effect, altering our usual encounter with the entrance of the station, erasing its glass side as if revealing another dimension.

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Nicolas Sassoon - WAVES


Typically Massey’s work accentuates and amplifies natural phenomena, often heightened through artificial means or via slight manipulations, exploring notions of time and space, and the mutable connections between them.

In Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake) Massey deftly combines 171 narrow-field photographs of the night sky on the same strip of film, achieved by making minor adjustments to camera angle over a lengthy period of time. Even though the image is artificially constructed, the luminous pattern of the starry night-time sky retains its convincingly poetic expanse while throwing into question the veracity of the photographic image. Its blueness is much closer to that of a daytime sky and as such connects to the location whereby it greets passengers as they arrive or depart at the station. By linking notions of celestial navigation – wayfaring – to more contemporary means of travel, Via Lactea throws into flux a consideration of temporality and site.

Scott Massey lives and works in Vancouver. He studied photography at Emily Carr University of Art & Design. His work is in private and public collections including Visual Art Collection, Office of Foreign Affairs (Canada), the Rennie Collection,Vancouver and the Surrey Art Gallery.

Presented by the Contemporary Art Gallery in partnership with Canada Line Public Art Program – IntransitBC.

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Scott Massey - Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake)


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the Canadian premiere of two new films, by British artist Andrew Cross.

The Solo features Carl Palmer, legendary rock drummer of the 1970s supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, performing a series of specially composed drum solos in a work that explores the relationship between drummer and drum kit. The film examines different aspects of percussion, with the solo snare drum giving way to brushes, cymbals, hands, felt beaters, and finally a full drum kit solo. Through a process of rigorous editing, sequences of tightly framed images are constructed; Cross’ minimalist style giving rise to a consideration of the shifting nature of cultural value.

Ensemble is Cross’s latest collaboration with 1970s progressive rock musicians, focusing on a group once dubbed Europe’s biggest cult band: The Enid. Throughout their 36 year checkered history, The Enid have both captivated and confounded audiences, always defying clear categorization. In this characteristically restrained film—contradicting the conventions of the “rock-umentary” with the unlikeliest of rock stars—Cross presents an intimate portrait of enigmatic founder Robert John Godfrey together with current band members at their studio and collective home in Northampton, England, and their recent concert with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

In partnership with PuSh Festival and SFU Woodward’s.

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Andrew Cross - The Solo & Ensemble


Federico Herrero is well-known as an abstract painter who uses unconventional locations and surfaces as a context for his large scale graphic murals. While Herrero at times works inside galleries, he often works with difficult sites whether it is the horizontal expanse of an exposed rooftop or the narrow corner of the custodian’s closet. His work, through form, colour and context directly addresses the division between art and social life, attempting to build a bridge between art as a specialized commodity and its larger place in the community. To address these concerns and extending our exhibition programme into the streets, the Contemporary Art Gallery commissioned Herrero to design a mural for our windows, using his formal vocabulary as a visual membrane, bringing our presence directly into the city. Also working with Autobox Media, the CAG designed a program, using Layar Reality Browser to create a virtual mural to be applied on selected sites throughout Vancouver. The artwork is accessible through any smartphone. Please go to http://offsite.contemporaryartgallery.ca for full details.

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Federico Herrero - Vibrantes


A Way To Go was the first part of the “GPS PROJECT” generated through the Education Program of Contemporary Art Gallery.

The word “Alley” comes from the original French root word “Allée” which literally translates as; A Way To Go. This was a walking journey project that consisted of using the GPS mobile device to navigate an alternative route through the downtown core by only taking alleyways and shortcuts. The passage was less distracting than crowded streets and avoided being a target for consumers by staying off the main roads. These routes are named after brief encounters with objects and/or subjects found in each individual alleyway rather than being named after important political figures or national historical references like most main roads in Vancouver. The names of the alley were included in the GPS map application. Through this journey, the participants came across site-specific installations, images activated by the GPS device, video clips and information about hidden spaces in the back alley.

Examples of this were images taken from inside an abandoned Japanese Auto Centre that has no access to the general public. Also an installation that was installed behind the fenced up corner in an underground parking lot to prevent homeless over-night staying, another example were details about a recycled water container underneath the Emery Barnes Park. This project continued to unfold describing more hidden objects/subjects in the allies of Vancouver’s downtown core over the following 3 months.

This program is generously supported by TELUS, 2010 Legacies Now and the Canadian Art Foundation. With thanks to Hannah Hughes and Autobox.

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Ron Tran - A Way To Go


Hammertown was a touring exhibition that highlighted a young generation of Canadian artists, with a focus on West Coast practice, and on artists who had recently come to prominence. The artists all shared an interest in widely available commodities, cultural products and popular media, and often re-inscribed these materials with personal, politicized meanings. The exhibition‘s engagement with landscape was a touchstone for works that propose a dialogue with social histories and ideas of place.

Location: Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, Scotland; Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool, England (April/May, 2003)

October 5 – November 14, 2002

Catalogue with text by participating artists; co-published with The Fruitmarket Gallery, UK

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Hammertown


In collaboration with the Charles H. Scott Gallery, CAG presented an exhibition of Cai Guo-Qiang, one of China’s most internationally recognized artists. His works insert traditional Chinese ideas and materials into contemporary Western idioms, contrasting the values of these disparate cultural systems. His work for the CAG began with a four-day performance in Vancouver’s Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden, an authentic full-scale classical Chinese garden. Fog machines were installed in this garden, creating a misty landscape that was painted on site by four traditional ink-brush painters. The paintings were displayed subsequently in the Binning Gallery, alongside an additional work created collaboratively by all five artists.

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Cai Guo Qiang - Performing Chinese Ink Painting


Social Practice Pot Luck
Saturday April 26 7-9pm

To mark the end of Broken City Lab’s Field House residency we are hosting a pot luck and intimate conversation regarding social practice with special guest artist and Founder/Director of the Art and Social Practice MFA program at Portland State University, Harrell Fletcher. Fletcher is visiting Vancouver as a part of the ‘Working as an Artist’ workshop series at Purple Thistle and will be giving an artist talk at the Thistle (Friday April 25, 7:30pm) and leading a workshop (Saturday April 26, 1-4pm) with local artist Carmen Papalia. http://purplethistle.ca/

Bring a snack and join in on the conversation. Broken City Lab with Harrell Fletcher will lead an open conversation regarding the current state of social practice.

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Social Practice Pot Luck with Harrell Fletcher


Tim Etchells
Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First
Monday, January 20  , 7 pm, by donation
The Fox Cabaret,  ‚2321  Main Street

Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First, written and directed by Tim Etchells, is a long free-associating
monologue that tumbles from topic to topic to create a vast, failing iteration and explanation of the world. Comical in its apparent naivety and preposterously encyclopedic in scope, the piece explores the absurdity and horror of consciousness as it tries and fails to seize and define everything that it encounters. Performed by Jim Fletcher, legendary New York actor, best known for his work with Richard Maxwell’s New York City Players and Elevator Repair Service’s Gatz, the monumental, word-for- word, eight hour staging of Fitzgerald’s prose masterwork. Join us post-performance for a drink and a conversation with Jim Fletcher and Tim Etchells, hosted by Norman Armour, Artistic and Executive Director of PuSh, in the newly renovated Fox Cabaret.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

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Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First - Tim Etchells


Ant Hampton and Tim Etchells
The Quiet Volume
January 17–19,  24­–26€, 31‚, February 1– 2
12–ƒ5 pm (€…60 minutes, no intermission)
Performances every 20 minutes, last performance 4­:…ƒ05pm
Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch
3‚rd Floor, ‚ƒ… 350 West Georgia Street

In The Quiet Volume — set at the library, designed for two at a time — recorded instructions and a stack of carefully selected books direct you through this contemplative, self-generated performance. The Quiet Volume takes what is considered a deeply personal and internal process and pushes it out into the surrounding environment so that one reader’s sphere collides with another’s. It exposes the particular tension common to libraries worldwide: a combination of silence and concentration within which different peoples’ experiences of reading unfold. In this performance, you and your co-reader/fellow audience member study printed words, conjure mental images, examine the act of reading in a new light in this surprising piece of ‘autoteatro.’ For the bibliophile and reluctant reader alike, The Quiet Volume exposes the strange magic at the heart of the reading experience.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

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The Quiet Volume - Ant Hampton & Tim Etchells


Tim Etchells
Tuesday, January 21, 4 .30 ‚…pm
Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema
SFU’s Goldcorp Centre for the Arts
149 West Hastings Street

In conjunction with the exhibition Who Knows, we join forces with PuSh to host Tim Etchells as a PuSh Festival   artist-in-residence and embrace the full scope of his practice. Whether, on stage or off, Etchells is concerned with liveness and presence and with the unfolding of events in time and place. At the centre of many of his projects, produced solely or with Forced Entertainment, there is a fascination with rules and systems in language, and in culture, and the way these systems are both productive and constraining. This artist talk forms a keynote
address as part of PuSh Assembly. Presented with PuSh International Performing Festival.

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Tim Etchells - Keynote Speech


Join us at the CAG and the False Creek Community Centre for free hands-on drawing activities with CAG artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly as part of the city wide event DRAW DOWN. Join artist Raymond Boisjoly to invent new tools for drawing and create new, experimental drawings.

WHERE:
False Creek Community Centre
Granville Island, 1318 Cartwright Street

WHEN:
Saturday June 15, 1 – 4 pm, free

Raymond Boisjoly is the Contemporary Art Gallery Artist in Residence at Burrard Marina Fieldhouse beneath the Burrard Bridge. A Vancouver based aboriginal artist of Haida and Quebecois descent Raymond combines contemporary craft, pop culture and street art with traditional Northwest Coast imagery in his work.

Draw Down 2013: On Saturday June 15, 2013, twenty-three different arts and cultural organizations across Vancouver will host a wide array of diverse, hands-on drawing workshops in community centres, museums, art galleries and on the street!

http://www.vancouverdrawdown.com/

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Re-inventing Drawing | Draw Down 2013


Richter 858 - Bill Frisell in conversation with Nigel Prince
Held at The Vancouver Playhouse

Bill Frisell turns brushstrokes into sounds with Richter 858, a live, multi-media event that presents compositions inspired by eight abstract works by celebrated German painter Gerhard Richter, one of the most important visual artists working today.

Before the Vancouver premiere of the piece, also featuring music from Sign of Life: Music for the 858 Quartet, Frisell was joined by CAG Director Nigel Prince for a conversation about art as inspiration and music as the medium.

Presented in collaboration with Vancouver New Music.

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Artist Talk | Bill Frisell


Held at the Vogue Theatre, Vancouver with after party at the CAG

The CAG is partnered with Cause+Affect to present a night on art and the city. Pecha Kucha is a global event held in š3 cities around the world gathering local creatives from across many fields to share their passions in a unique, concise format: each presenter shows images for seconds each.

PRESENTERS:
Andrew Young • dyoung.co
Caitlin Jones • front.bc.ca
Germaine Koh • germainekoh.com
Kaput • wackytupaky.com
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun • Artist
Michelle Allen • greencouchsessions.ca
Nicole Ondre • exercisecanada.com
Shaun Dacey • accessgallery.caburnabyartgallery.ca
Stephen Waddell • stephenwaddell.com
Zach Gray • thezolasmusic.com

http://www.pechakuchanightvancouver.com/Vol-23

 

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Artist Talk | Pecha Kucha Night Vancouver - Vol.23


Aelita: Queen of Mars (USSR, 1924)
Director: Jakov Protazanov

Film Screening at Pacific Cinematheque

Programmed on the occasion of Orchardson’s Endless Façade this marks a partnership between the Contemporary Art Gallery and Pacific Cinematheque. The most celebrated Soviet film until Battleship Potemkin, and perhaps second only to Metropolis as the most influential science fiction movie of the silent era, the exotic, extravagant Aelita — the world’s first-ever feature film about interplanetary travel — is a key example of Constructivist decor and costume.

Black and white, DVD, 111 minutes. Silent with English intertitles and musical score.

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Film Screening | Aelita: Queen of Mars


Richard Fung will present Dal Puri Diaspora (2012), an 80 minute film tracing the development of the dal puri roti, a dish originated in eastern India that traveled with South Asian and Caribbean Diasporas to Canada. There will be a post-screening conversation between Fung, Dr. Sneja Gunew (Professor of English and Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice, UBC) and Michelle Jacques (Chief Curator, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria).

Funded by the UBC President’s Endowment Fund in partnership with the Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre and the CAG.

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Talk | Dal Puri Diaspora


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support and nurture artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launches a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
The first talk presents collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who are currently working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They will discuss this series of workshops which invite the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois will discuss his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Join us on the Field House Studio balcony for free drop-in art activities for all ages responding to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and our current CAG exhibitions.

Saturday, June 29, 1–4pm
Saturday, July 27, 1–4pm
Saturday, August 24, 1–4pm

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

Raymond Boisjoly, As It Comes continues until June 16 and is located in the window spaces at the CAG and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line and The Burrard Marina Field House Studio Residency Program.

As It Comes at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program — IntransitBC.

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Field House Studio - Summer Programs


Join us to celebrate the launch CAPTURE a new photography festival for Vancouver, including projects and exhibitions by Mungo Thomson and James Welling at the Contemporary Art Gallery during October and November.

For more information on CAPTURE Photo Festival go here: http://capturephotofest.com/

The opening  launch event will be held at The Museum of Vancouver, 1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver, BC V6J 3J9, Canada.

on: Tuesday October 1, 7-10pm

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Opening | Capture launch - Mungo Thomson & James Welling


Dhrupad vocalist Harkeerat Mangat and Tabla drummer Sunny Matharu performed at the Burrard Marina Field House, Vancouver, Wednesday August 14. The occasion was a launch for the 2013 Summer issue of FUSE magazine.

Images by Maria Fedorova.
Sound by Phil Dion.

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Harkeerat Mangat & Sunny Matharu - Perform Live at the Field House


Artist Nathan Coley discusses his exhibition Knowledge, Kindliness and Courage at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver and the off-site work We Must Cultivate Our Garden, November 23, 2012 to January 20, 2013. Video by Brian Lye.

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Video | Nathan Coley


Broken City Lab (BCL) are currently artists-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House. Their four month project, Flagged for Review examines the surrounding site and its relation to current perceptions of the city through a series of initiated conversations. Every Tuesday until the end of April, the collective will host public games, temporary installations and conversations concerning social and political issues present in Vancouver. These will culminate in the production of a series of flags to be installed at the Field House and throughout the city during the last two months of their residency.

For the first two Tuesday night events, BCL are inviting participants to contemplate and define the use of flags in the urban setting, with the  aim of highlighting a range of curious and challenging ideas that inform the ways we experience, imagine and historicize the city of Vancouver.

During the evening on Tuesday March 18, a series of 12 questions were asked  to the attendees. Questions included conceptions of Vancouver as a place and an how individuals engage with politics. It was very interesting to talk about how we perceive the city in positives or negatives and to share with strangers our political thoughts. The evening finished with a game of ‘spin the bottle’ with participants answering the questions one on one with each other and with Broken City Lab members, Hiba and Justin. Above are a selection of images taken by Caitlin Carr from the evening.

UP NEXT:  

Tuesday April 1, 7-8.30pm
Projecting Forward

This Tuesday’s, Flagged For Review gathering with Broken City Lab will imagine what the future holds for the city of Vancouver, with a series of short declarations created and projected onto the Burrard Bridge. These declarations will be our hopes, doubts and dreams for the future of Vancouver.

Broken City Lab (BCL) are currently artists-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House. Their four month project, Flagged for Review examines the surrounding site and its relation to current perceptions of the city through a series of initiated conversations. Every Tuesday until the end of April, the collective will host public games, temporary installations and conversations concerning social and political issues present in Vancouver. These will culminate in the production of a series of flags to be installed at the Field House and throughout the city during the last two months of their residency.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver.

For this residency we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative Communities Award.

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Flagged For Review with Broken City Lab – Tue April 1


 

 

It is with deep sadness we at the Contemporary Art Gallery learn of the death of Itee Pootoogook. His exhibition here last year proved a highlight of our program, it success seen in the positive reception from critics and visitors alike. We remember him fondly through his work which lives on.

The CAG exhibited Itee Pootoogook in 2013 with the solo exhibition Buildings and Land and an off-site commission Sky At Night  at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line. A selection of images from the exhibitions are seen above.
“His drawings of vernacular architecture in the North are daring in their simplicity, and his portraits of everyday activities, such as watching TV and fixing skidoos, are similarly unsettling in their apparent modesty and their claims about the sources and nature of Inuit art.”

- Lisa Gregoire, Nunatsiaq online

http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674canada_loses_a_nunavut_master_of_contemporary_inuit_art/

http://blogs.vancouversun.com/2014/03/20/itee-pootoogook-innovative-nunavut-artist-dead-at-63/

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Remembering Itee Pootoogook


On Monday, October 7th we attended a potluck get-together for everyone involved in the City of Vancouver’s Field House Residence Program at Roundhouse Community Centre. There were heaping plates of kale, rice, beans and hummus, mini glasses of wine, and three hours worth of interesting presentations about what each group of artists are doing to make the most of their unique locations.

One of my favourites was the Loco Moto Art Collective, located in the Aberthau Mansion at West Point Grey Community Centre. Spearheaded by Laura Lee Coles but including around 20 others, the group works  broadly in the realm of digital media, eco-aesthetics, and the relationships between humans, technology and nature. They are the newest Field House to have set-up shop, and they’ve already hosted a few events indoors and outdoors. They seem to have lots of wild and wonderful things coming up for the new year. They’ll be launching a new exhibition called No Memes No at Hot Art Wet City at 2206 Main Street on the spookiest day of the year–October 31st.

Another group that piqued my interest was Cloudscape Comics. They’re located at 5955 Ross Street inside the Memorial Park South Field House. The 30 of them approach the production of comics from different backgrounds, which makes their oeuvre very dynamic. There’s something for everyone and they release an anthology of comics every year. They recently posted a call-out for submissions with Sci-Fi/Fantasy comics with queer characters and themes. They offer a free drop-in comic jam every Wednesday starting at 7:30pm at their Field House.

And these are only a few examples of the 50 artists who are enlivening 13 spaces in parks around the city. It was awesome to hear about the ways that other artists are negotiating the best use of their spaces, and it’ll be great to keep an eye on all these projects that are largely community oriented and site specific.

- Jaclyn

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Field House Meet-up Day


The rain stopped briefly today to allow for the installation of the very colourful Negative Space by Mungo Thomson, part of CAPTURE Photography Festival which launches tomorrow, Tuesday Oct 1 at the Museum of Vancouver.

Take a look, at some ‘sneak peak’ pics from the installation this afternoon at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line, or… if you are travelling on the Canada Line, get off at the Yaletown-Roundhouse station and take a look for yourself!

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Installing Rainbows and Negative Space, Mungo Thomson in Yaletown


I knocked on the door of the Field House to be greeted by Raymond who had set out two glasses and a bottle of mineral water. We chatted about Miranda July’s latest project involving personal e-mails and Sheila Heti’s admirable (and very literary) contributions to it; about women writers who incorporate auto-biographical elements into their work; and Wendy, a tragically hilarious fictional character whose haphazard attempt to become part of the contemporary art world is rendered as a comic column by Walter Scott. With the click of a button, we began:

Hey Raymond. What are you up to at the field house?
I’m a Vancouver based artist working on a lot of assorted things here. No one big project but just working toward a lot of stuff coming up—producing work as well as doing research for future work.

How have you enjoyed using this space, now that you’ve been here for a few months?
It’s really amazing. Especially since the weather has gotten better, there’s been this incredible thing where there’s always a lot of activity around here, with Bard on the Beach being really proximate. It’s made for some interesting times.

You were recently in Norway, for a festival called Riddu Riddu which brings Sami people together with indigenous people from around the world. What were you doing there and what did you learn?
I was there presenting work in the context of the festival which was nice. There was less pressure, because everybody there is going to see Buffy Sainte-Marie. It was sort of just like “yeah, I’ve got something in the library” so it feels a lot different [than having a solo exhibition]. I learned that it–it was just nice to come to understand the different circumstances that people sort of come to claim indigenous identity within. It gave me ways to think about how those processes operate in the Americas—things that otherwise just seem really kind of straightforward or easy—that there are different models for how those things happened.

And what was the work you exhibited there?
They were derived from a body of work I made a few years ago where I made indigenous place name black metal logos.

Check us out again soon (Part II on its way!) for more about Raymond.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part I


This is Part 2 of an interview with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly and CAG Field House intern Jaclyn Bruneau. Read Part I here.

Afternoons with Raymond – Part II

Jaclyn (JB): Raymond, your recent trip to Norway wasn’t your first connection to Norwegian culture. I heard  a connection of yours to Norway was the black metal music text works made in response to the proposed re-naming of Stanley Park. The City was bouncing around the idea of reintroducing the name of the indigenous tribe that resided on that site since as long as 3000 years ago. What was it about the aesthetic of black metal that specifically jarred you and made it seem right for the project?

Raymond (RB): My interest in it was about being able to approach indigenous issues that didn’t necessarily have to reproduce familiar, established understandings of aboriginal artistic practice. It was about the ability to frame it through another aesthetic that isn’t premised on primordial belonging—that isn’t about what we think we already know about the aesthetics but the capacity to come to see it differently.

JB: Right, and so hence the appearance of the text which is sharp, thorny and harsh-looking. Why were those characteristics the best fit for a project that was trying to reclaim or reestablish a name, considering that the conditions now are completely different in this city for the way we think about First Nations people?

RB: I just like the idea that a lot of it is really decrepit or withered—that it seems to place itself in the midst of the process of decay; that it somehow, at least for me, registers somehow, the less than ideal circumstances that we find ourselves in; where maybe we can’t necessarily conceive of a solution to the complexity of the relationship between aboriginal peoples, the Canadian government, and Canadians generally. And that became this really sort of weird thing that could register those complexities in a certain way. That it was about cultural competency that wasn’t premised on aboriginal identity or belonging but was an elective affinity—that somebody who likes black metal might come to encounter them, and it maybe smuggled in a concern for aboriginal issues that maybe could be communicated or could be legible to a different audience.

JB: You make use of text in some really intricate and thoughtful ways that invite people to re-read and re-assess, testing different potential meanings. I’m talking about your project ‘As it Comes’  in the window of the CAG as well as at Yaletown-Roundhouse  Station, Canada Line. Has text always been part of your work? Why is it important?

RB: Ever since I was a photo student at Emily Carr, I had supportive instructors who allowed me to do something other than making photographs, so it just became this thing that was within a lot of work that I came to encounter. There could be this discrepancy between the work and its description—I found that was a really active place to situate myself, in terms of thinking through (in the very imprecise way) that messages can be communicated.

Like there was this idea that I had about the possibility for thinking of how a failure of translation could actually be a productive thing, that it could be about simply looking at those contingencies of communication and the fact that we use these various strategies, but they produce a very particular framing; that language becomes an interesting way to conceive of that process through which ferry the messages across from person to person, from place to place.

JB: The choice of typeface seems inextricably important from the overall formation of the messages you create. Do the text and the typeface arise somewhat simultaneously in your ideation process, or how is the decision made for that pairing?

RB: It seems very straightforward to me, at least. There’s not necessarily any sort of long process of trying to figure out what typeface might work. So it becomes primarily more about simply what seems like a manageable typeface to use—something that doesn’t necessarily call too much attention to itself, which I guess is a lot different from the black metal works. I sort of see it as being active but somehow not really directive for the message in any particular way. Instead, somehow the message comes to fill it, strangely. So it’s a weird process that I don’t know if I can really articulate.

It’s—at least to me—some not very interesting logistical phenomenon. It’s like, I just have to pick one.

JB: You are hosting a talk at the Field House by writer  Nathan Crompton for Culture Days on Saturday, September 28th at 4 pm . Can you tell me a bit about the thought behind inviting him ?

RB: I don’t really recall the first place I encountered him but he’s really active in Vancouver, and he’s asking difficult questions about a lot of civic processes, and framing them in an accessible way that allows people to talk about them.

But I was interested in talking with him specifically about the article that he co-authored that was recently published on The Mainlander website about the Kitsilano Reserve which is immediately proximate to this studio—because it had come up a few times, so I was just really anxious to think about the necessity to think through that process. The studio being given by the City of Vancouver to arts groups, and individuals, and institutions like the CAG—it seems like a good means not simply to activate the space but also to come to understand something too—that there’s a more complex history behind the fact that these field houses have fallen out of use, and it seems like an interesting thing to talk about. So it’s actually a convenient thing, sort of seeing that article and realizing the potential for some kind of public discussion.

Stay tuned for the third and final installment of this discussion!

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part II


This is Part III of an interview with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly and CAG Field House intern Jaclyn Bruneau. Preceding Part III was a Part I and II. Check ‘em out.

Afternoons with Raymond – PART III

JB: Can you talk a little bit about how your own heritage relates to your work? I know you’ve talked about challenging these more classical, traditional ways of representing indigenous cultures.

RB: Well it does come to inform my work, but not in any simple way. I have made works that sort of trade on traditional imagery. I’m always sort of concerned with making sure that the work doesn’t come to be mistaken for the thing it represents. I’m interested in my capacity as an indigenous artist to be able to make work about indigenous issues that doesn’t simply reduce that to me making work about indigenous issues because I am myself indigenous.
I would like to think that I am also making work about these things because they’re important to everyone. They concern certain circumstances that we’re all in the midst of that come to impact us in uneven ways. So it becomes something that I definitely want to make accessible in a way that is about it coming to have this capacity to communicate something of that experience but in a strange, unfamiliar, unforeseen way.

So my heritage comes to influence that and it’s kind of about seeing a certain possibility in that, in terms of making contemporary art that doesn’t have to come close to aboriginal cultural practices as it is known, but could potentially work towards creating some sort of intuitive change to things or a subtle way of actually just letting material come to do something in and of itself. It’s a complex process in that—in a lot of works, my heritage isn’t necessarily readable in it and I’m interested in that discrepancy, where it becomes sort of, like, a furtive presence. It ultimately requires a certain activity to understand that relationship.

JB: What other cultures have affected you and influenced your work?

RB: A lot of things I’ve been interested in have been about the analyses of subcultures. I look to music a lot. I look at a lot of things that primarily address ideas of cultural transformation as represented through popular music, like the strange idea that both funk and heavy metal are derived from rhythm and blues in a way that each musical form was subtly transformed in a certain transitional process to communicate to a particular audience at a given time and place, but somehow leads to these very divergent forms.

So I’m really interested in that thing where it scarcely becomes that thing that it’s going to be. At least, looking at funk and heavy metal—not specifically cultures, but subcultural forms—becomes an interesting analogy between, at least for me—in terms of trying to understand that process—simply conceiving of an artistic practice isn’t about knowing what it is but realizing that my work can come to transform my understanding of things I have done previously.

JB: What does digital culture have to do with all of this? I’m thinking about the LightJet prints that were on display in March and April which you created by dragging your iPhone around a flatbed scanner as it played musical performances from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Is there a particular comment you’re making by converging these multiple electronic processes of new and old?

RB: So they’re prints made by laser exposing the piece of paper. It’s processed like any photograph, so I guess that melding becomes a strange thing of finding some other sort of way to show the manner in which photography can index time. In a lot of cases, strangely, many of the scans that I made scanned right to left rather than left to right, so it creates these weird tensions that might not be visible. But I like that strange thing in which these different technologies come to function—that they can be used in these ways that they weren’t necessarily intended to be used for; to create some image of these different types of image-making. The ipod on the scanner leaves this layer in between the two of them—the dust and scratches on the glass, so it’s this strange thing of there being a depicted sort of material and an actual material, somehow.

I’m hearing all these stories about children’s intuitive use of touch screen technology that comes to affect the way that they expect printed magazines to function. It leads me to think of that strange thing where our encounter with visual material just creates this different relationship we have to it that is about interacting with it; seeing a certain capacity with it to touch it to make it work.

I think that process of using the ipods and the scanners means to—well, that easily manipulable aspect of it to hold an ipod in my hand—it’s sort of about stressing that physical manifestation of it. That it persists as an object that can be used in these weird ways. So it’s just a present capacity of an ipod and a scanner to produce an image in a very ad hoc way.

JB: Tell us about some of the books on your shelves.

RB: [Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language], I’m looking at it because I’m teaching a course that is ostensibly about text-based art. The book is this really amazing thing—there are chapters in it that deal with the use of geological metaphors and biological metaphors in our understanding of language… so the idea that a language could be said to die as being a biological metaphor. Looking at shifts, thinking of the way in which language shifts where two languages can come to encounter one another and have subtle effects on one another is often discussed in terms of geology. So it’s a really amazing in the sense that it finds all this incredibly rich imagery in the way people sort of discuss language; and what people expect of it.

JB: How does it read?

RB: It’s quite academic, but really kind of a fascinating thing in the sense that it’s episodic. I know a lot of these started as individual articles—like, H & Co. was first published in Cabinet. So it reads very easily in the sense that it’s not very demanding and fairly short and accessible. So it’s a really incredible book that I’ve been returning to for quite a while and that I’m excited to finally be able to share with students.

JB: Where are you at with the course?

RB: I’m teaching it at Emily Carr and there’s a lot of planning to do for it this month [August].

JB: What else have you got in that pile?

RB: [chuckles] What else?

JB: Show me one more.

RB: Well, there’s this incredible Jimmie Durham catalog—A Matter of Life and Death and Singing. [Begins flipping through the book and does not stop until his response concludes]. This is part of a career-long retrospective. It’s this incredible document that is exciting in the sense that it seems tied to a lot of these other things, like a collection of his poetry and critical writings that are also coming out, but he’s just someone that I really admire and it’s nice to see this kind of extended document concerning his career.

JB: Thank you so much for your time.

RB: No problem.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part III


Another sunny Saturday brought lots of folks ’round for our 3rd and final Family Day of this summer season. Ros offered a step-by-step demo of how to create functional pinwheels of all shapes and sizes. There were lots of different papers, from patterned origami to neon construction, and some sparkly pipe cleaners to add that final zing. Thanks to everyone who came out for our Family Day series this summer and we hope to see you all soon.

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Family Day – Pinwheel Making at the Field House


A behind the scenes look at the installation of Itee Pootoogook’s Sky at Night,  a Cape Dorset sunset comes to Yaletown.

The offsite project at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program — IntransitBC.

 

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Look what’s happening at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station…


Okay, well, if you have a friend who is 12 and under, they can accompany you, but otherwise, it’s kids only as the CAG hosts a month of Children’s Film screenings! Continuing his tradition of challenging traditional methods of display, artist Gareth Moore has worked with an impressive set of international artists (including Ulla Von Brandenburg, Keren Cytter, Geoffrey Farmer, Julia Feyrer, Harrell Fletcher, Mike Marshall and Sylvain Sailly)  to produce a series of 2-3 minute short films for children.

Kids know that art museums and galleries are mostly for adults. No touching, no loud talking, no rough-housing. In this series, the exhibition has been taken out of the gallery so that there is no confusion that this is not a program for adults. There’s no shushing (unless the other kids want you to be quiet) and if you should want to laugh or sing-along, then that’s what you do.

I’ve been lucky enough to host 2 sessions so far, and I’ve really enjoyed watching the different groups interact with the program. Today’s modern Vancouver kid is not entirely unfamiliar with a 16mm projector, but it’s definitely not something that most of them see regularly. At the Moberly Arts and Culture Centre afternoon showing, the long school day and the novelty of the projector inspired a few of the watchers to project their own shadow puppets over the silhouettes of The Little Hunchback and  The Man and the Wild Boar. At Emery Barnes, we spent 2 days outdoors in a tent, inviting kids to check out the film during some of the hotter, last days of summer. Many of the park-goers were under 5, and while we had many in-and-out visitors,  30 minutes of contemporary film was a little much for the toddler crowd.

Some of my highlights so far have been singing along with Tina Fenomena, by Keren Cytter (♫meow, meow-meow-meow♫) and watching the reactions to (my personal favourite) The Drawer, by Geoffrey Farmer, as he draws on top of a picture of David. While the initial flash of the famous genitals can cause a bit of a stir, it’s more the fact that the Drawer draws inside an art book which causes confusion and delight in the crowd.

My next date with the Children’s Films is our screening at the Strathcona Community Centre from 9AM-12:45PM. Tell your friends under 12 to make a date. If they can’t make it on a school day, I’ll also be hosting 2 weekend screenings at the Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre from 11-4PM on Saturday, November 3rd and Sunday, November 4th. See you then!

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

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No Adults Allowed!


In partnership with the City of Vancouver Field House Studio Residency Program, the Contemporary Art Gallery is pleased to present Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly as our inaugural resident artist.

For six months he will occupy the Burrard Marina Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement, coinciding with the launch of As It Comes, two new interrelated public works. The title appears at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station as a discrete piece, humorously foreboding, and more comic than terrifying, presented in brightly coloured vinyl like a credit from a B-list horror film. Linked to the text in the gallery windows, Boisjoly removes all suggestions of the past, not to deny what has become history, but with the intent to restore belief systems that are still intact.

Raymond Boisjoly
As It Comes
February 8 to June 16, 2013
Window Spaces and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line and Field House Studio Residency Program.

Opening reception: Thursday February 7, 7–10 pm
Please join us to celebrate the opening of our new exhibitions and to launch this new initiative.

The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver through its Field House Studio Residency Program and by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

As It Comes at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program — Intransit BC.

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Announcing: The Fieldhouse Studio Residency Program partnership


Here are a few images from PechaKucha Night Vol. 23 which took place on September 21st, 2012 at the Vogue Theater. This edition was presented by Contemporary Art Gallery in partnership with the design firm Cause + Affect.

This highly successful evening focused on the visual arts as you can see from the list of speakers below. The presentations were very diverse, often funny and very informative. Many presented on their individual art practices while others discussed the organizations they work for. Overall it was a great evening, capturing a large audience of over 1000, and continuing to the after party, which was hosted by Contemporary Art Gallery.

We’d like to thank all the speakers:

Andrew Young • dyoung.co
Caitlin Jones • front.bc.ca
Germaine Koh • germainekoh.com
Kaput • wackytupaky.com
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun • Artist
Michelle Allen • greencouchsessions.ca
Nicole Ondre • exercisecanada.com
Shaun Dacey • accessgallery.ca, burnabyartgallery.ca
Stephen Waddell • stephenwaddell.com
Zach Gray • thezolasmusic.com

With special thanks to Cause + Affect for inviting us to participate and pulling the evening together, and we’d like to extend our warm regards to the wonderful group of volunteers who made the event possible.

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PechaKucha Night Vol. 23 Vancouver


Since mid-July, WAVES by Nicolas Sassoon has been on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Skytrain Station. This is the second commission the CAG has produced for this public space. The first was Scott Massey’s poetic blue sky.

Currently Nicolas Sassoon’s graphic mural is installed on the north window of the Station. For this work, Nicolas created a multi-layer Moire pattern to intentional cause an optical effect that gives an impression of movement – so commuters can see WAVES “moving” as they are passing by to catch their train.

The installation seems to evolve during the day with the change of light. WAVES is highlighted in the morning from the inside of the station, because of the rising sun, and from the outside in the late afternoon. The wind also accentuates the pattern by making the layer vibrate gently and when a train passes through the turbulence adds a dramatic tension.

Every day I commute through this station myself, and as I go down the stairs, I can sense the effect’s of the mural.  It catches my field of vision and when I look closer, I notice the coloured screen of WAVES, which not only draws my attention to my own movement but also the trees and the light outside through its pixels.

Nicolas Sassoon’s Off-site project WAVES will remain on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line until January 20, 2013.

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Moving WAVES


On Wednesday July 11 between 1:30 and 4:30 am Nicolas Sassoon with four extension ladders and some expert help installed the first layer of WAVES  at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Canada Line Station.

It was a difficult task  getting to the North windows above the stairs. We tried the morning before with a boom, but couldn’t get the massive machine through the door.

Thanks to Contrada Enterprises LTD for helping us solve the problem. In less than 24 hours they pulled together a great crew who fearlessly climbed the 40 foot extension ladders and clamped on the frame in less than three hours.

The mural was finished the next afternoon by Proper Design who perfectly applied the second layer to the outside windows.

Many thanks to both. The piece looks great. It is on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line until January 20, 2013. We hope you get to see it numerous times.

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Open Your Eyes and Watch Your Step at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station


Last Saturday was Vancouver Draw Down. The event took place in multiple locations all over town and it was great day. I hope you had a chance to get out and participate in some of the stations set up around the city. I managed to take in 6 of the 18 locations and one of my stops was naturally the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Artist and Educator, Landon Mackenzie, transformed the gallery’s street front, foyer & hallways into a “Map Room.” Based on her work, Landon invited everyone to explore the “many potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being.”

The place was packed when I arrived. Every table was covered with works in progress as visitors created collages from pieces of topographical print-outs.

When visitors were done they were invited to sketch the Monahan pieces in the BC Binning Gallery, examining form and mark making.

This was the 3rd year for Vancouver Draw Down and I can’t wait for the next. The event celebrated drawing and invited everyone to participate by simply making a mark. As the Vancouver Draw Down site says “If you can write your name, you can draw!”

I saw another great quote posted by Opus Art Supplies encouraging people to dispell their preconceptions: “If you hear a voice within you say – you cannot paint, then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced.” van Gogh

The same goes with drawing!

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

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Vancouver Draw Down: the Map Room.


If you were walking down Nelson Street in the evening between February 3rd and May 16th, you hopefully spied the work Aurorae by Scott Massey in the CAG street front window spaces. During the day, the window spaces appeared to be coated in some kind of nondescript blue paint and visitors would come into the gallery either unaware that there was something on display or perplexed as to what it represented. When on my volunteer shift at the gallery, I would welcome visitors to make a date to come back to the gallery after dark so that they could enjoy the light-show piece, but as the gallery was closed most evenings after 6 pm, I never really saw if anyone came back to satisfy their curiosity.

I was  lucky enough to have a friend live in the building across the street and we made a special tea & art viewing date together, specifically so that we could spend an evening with Aurorae.

But even if you didn’t have a friend living across the street from the gallery, or if you didn’t find the time after dark to see Massey’s light display piece in the window spaces, you’re able to see it here thanks to his time lapse video below.

As the night sky lightens on Massey’s celestial light-show phenomenon, the light takes on a more earthly halogen with Josephine Meckseper’s discussion on consumer culture and the world of advertising. The exhibition American Leg by Josephine Meckseper opens on Thursday, May 24th (7-10 PM). Currently based in New York, this will be Meckseper’s first exhibition in Canada.  Additionally Josephine Meckseper will talk on her work on Wednesday May 23 at 7 pm at SFU Woodwards, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, this talk is free and all are welcome.

Scott Massey’s Off-site project Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake) will remain on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line until July 1st. This piece, also dealing with the night sky, can be seen in the day time (or night time).

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Window Spaces Fade to Black


Jenifer Papararo, the CAG’s Curator, was recently invited to speak at an event hosted by FreshMedia. Freshmedia is an organization that celebrates and fosters alternative media sources by generating conversation and ultimately, innovation.

The event, dubbed Remixology Six, focused on media in public space, the commercialization thereof, and how to build community in light of this. Jenifer, along with Consultant Hannah Hughes, discussed A Way To Go, Ron Tran’s current Offsite Project for the CAG. Remixology’s main questions, “How do we use new and old media tools to affect public space and generate conversations? ” was especially pertinant to Ron’s work and his attempt to breath poetic humanism into the sometimes cold (or at the very least, cool) world of technology and new media.

The other panelists were Alexander Biko McNaughton, public space specialist, David Mattatall, creator of  Zoo Zhop, and Debra Zho fom Center A. Check out Center A and Vancouver New Music’s recent Co-Lab effort www.map-sense.comby Germain Koh and Gillian Jerome for another creative and sensitive use of new media. Ain’t Zeitgeist grand?

Meredith Carr, CAG Curatorial Intern

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Remixology Six


$10.00

Published:
16 pages

UNDERTHESUN, an artist publication by Roy Arden. was produced as part of his solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery, the publication documents the majority of the nearly one hundred works on view. It serves as a representation and record of the exhibition, as well as provides the artist with an opportunity to formally reconsider the excess of images, his reasons for selecting them and their relational context. Published on the occasion of the exhibition Roy Arden UNDERTHESUN at the CAG, January 28 to March 27, 2011. Photography by Scott Massey. Design Roy Arden and Mark Timmings.

Mimicking commercial advertising layouts, Arden's design is a cacophony of colour and image. The publication has a refined newspaper-like quality. Printed on large broadsheets folded down to loose sheets, each page opens into individual collage posters.

This publication was made possible with support from the City of Vancouver's 125th Anniversary Grants Program. The exhibition was sponsored by The Hamber Foundation.

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UNDERTHESUN - Roy Arden


$10.00

Published:
35 pages

This exhibition catalogue was published to accompany the exhibition Unterspiel cureated by Seamus Kealy and held at the Contemporary Art Gallery from July 1 to August 14, 2005. The exhibition and publication was co-produced with the Critical and Curatorial Studies Program at the University of British Columbia and Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. Design by Jeff Khonsary.

This publication is out of print.

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Unterspiel


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