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Broken City Lab
Flagged For Review
Burrard Marina Field House Studio
1655 Whyte Avenue
Every Tuesday evening:

March 18 to April 29, 7- 8.30pm

NEXT: Tuesday, April 8, 7-8.30pm

The Trouble is…

Bring your questions, suspicions, and inspirations for art in public spaces to an open conversation on art as troublemaking and troublemaking as art.

Broken City Lab (BCL) are currently artists-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House. Their four month project, Flagged for Review examines the surrounding site and its relation to current perceptions of the city through a series of initiated conversations. Every Tuesday until the end of April, the collective will host public games, temporary installations and conversations concerning social and political issues present in Vancouver. These will culminate in the production of a series of flags to be installed at the Field House and throughout the city during the last two months of their residency.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver.

For this residency we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative Communities Award.

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Broken City Lab - Flagged For Review


Social Practice Pot Luck
Saturday April 26 7-9pm

To mark the end of Broken City Lab’s Field House residency we are hosting a pot luck and intimate conversation regarding social practice with special guest artist and Founder/Director of the Art and Social Practice MFA program at Portland State University, Harrell Fletcher. Fletcher is visiting Vancouver as a part of the ‘Working as an Artist’ workshop series at Purple Thistle and will be giving an artist talk at the Thistle (Friday April 25, 7:30pm) and leading a workshop (Saturday April 26, 1-4pm) with local artist Carmen Papalia. http://purplethistle.ca/

Bring a snack and join in on the conversation. Broken City Lab with Harrell Fletcher will lead an open conversation regarding the current state of social practice.

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Social Practice Pot Luck with Harrell Fletcher


CAG volunteer Kay Slater gives a tour in French of the current exhibitions on display.

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Guided Visit in French | Kay Slater


Michael Turner
Tuesday, May 6, 7pm

Michael Turner is a Vancouver-based writer of fiction, criticism and song. His published multi-genre literary titles include Hard Core Logo, The Pornographer’s Poem and 8 × 10. He has also
written essays on the work of artists Julia Feyrer, Brian Jungen, Ken Lum, Christina Mackie and Michael Morris, whose 2012 exhibition Letters: Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry was co-curated by Turner and Scott Watson at the Morris and Helen Belkin Gallery, UBC. A frequent collaborator, he has written scripts with Stan Douglas, poems with Geoffrey Farmer and songs with Andrea Young. His writing can be found online at Canadian Art and on his blog at www.mtwebsit.blogspot.ca. Turner will respond to Kevin Schmidt’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Michael Turner


CAG Communications Coordinator Jill Henderson tours the exhibitions and explores the history of the CAG.

 

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Guided Visit | Jill Henderson


Join us for free drop-in art making events for families. All ages are welcome!

Presented in collaboration with ArtStarts on Saturdays http://artstarts.com/free-weekend-workshops.

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Family Days at the Gallery


Shama Khanna
Tuesday, April 8, 7pm

London-based curator Shama Khanna’s current research project Flatness engages screen based images and immaterial culture in relation to the internet. Launched at the Oberhausen Short Film Festival Flatness currently operates across multiple platforms including www.flatness.eu featuring contributions by artists, writers and technologists who engage with the web as a creative site and a space for viewing. Khanna is undertaking a residency at Western Front (March 17 – April 14, 2014) and will respond to the work of Kevin Schmidt.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Shama Khanna


Margaret Dragu
Tuesday, March 11, 7pm

Margaret Dragu is a key figure in Vancouver’s art community, with a practice encompassing video, installation, web-based projects, publications and performance. Dragu is integral to the development of performance art in Canada and was the first subject of FADO’s Performance Art Legends series in 2000. In 2012 she was awarded the Governor General award for Visual Art & Media. Her performances are relational, durational, interventionist and community-based often enacting various personae to explore history, memory and performance in the everyday. Most recently Richmond Art Gallery presented Dragu’s first Gallery-based solo exhibition, VERB WOMAN: the wall is in my head/a dance of forgetting. Dragu will respond to the performance work of Tim Etchells.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Margaret Dragu


Marie-Hélène Tessier
Tuesday, March 4, 7pm

This feedback talk will be presented in French.

Marie-Hélène Tessier is a visual artist and writer based in Vancouver. Her work is site-specific and migrates freely between fiction, philosophy, fashion and art. Preoccupied with the infinite slicing of reality and the construction of meaning, her research seeks to collapse hierarchies of knowing. She has a degree in French Literature from University of Montreal, a visual arts diploma from Emerson College, a philosophy diploma from Sunbridge College, Columbia University and she graduated in visual arts from Emily Carr University of Art + Design in 2001. Tessier will respond to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Marie-Hélène Tessier- Froment Fromented


Luis Jacob
Tuesday Feb 11, 7 pm, free

Join us for a special addition to our Feedback series. Acclaimed Toronto-based artist Luis Jacob will respond to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition ‘Fröbel Fröbeled’, he will discuss his own practice and interest in pedagogical ideas contained in the exhibition.

Luis Jacob is an artist based in Toronto, whose diverse practice addresses social interaction and the subjectivity of aesthetic experience. Realized as painting, video, installation, photography and actions in the public sphere, Jacob’s work invites a collision of meaning systems that destabilize our conventions of viewing and that open up possibilities for engagement and the creation of knowledge.

As an artist, he has achieved an international reputation – particularly since his participation in documenta12, curated by Ruth Noack and Roger Bürgel in 2007. Several significant solo exhibitions include Kunstverein Hamburg (curated by Meike Behm and Yilmaz Dziewior in 2008) ; Städtisches Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (curated by Suzanne Titz in 2009); Fonderie Darling, Montréal (curated by Marie Fraser in 2010); Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto (curated by David Liss in 2011); and Kunsthalle Lingen (curated by Meike Behm in 2012).

Jacob’s work was also featured in group exhibitions at the Taipei Biennial (2012); Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2012); Witte de With Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2012); Generali Foundation, Vienna (2011); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2010); Contemporary Art Museum, Houston (2010); Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Philadelphia (2009); Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst (MuHKA), Antwerp (2008); Barbican Art Gallery, London (2008); and The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto (2008).

His work is found in the permanent collection of the Generali Foundation (Vienna, Austria); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa, Canada); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, USA); Städtisches Museum Abteiberg (Mönchengladbach, Germany); Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Canada); Museion‚ Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (Bolzano, Italy); Agnes Etherington Art Centre (Kingston, Canada); Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto, Canada); and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, University of Toronto (Toronto, Canada).

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Luis Jacob


Adele Diamond
Tuesday, February 18, 7pm

Adele Diamond, Ph.D., is the Canada Research Chair Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. Her work integrates developmental, cognitive, neuroscience and molecular genetic approaches to examine fundamental questions about the development of the cognitive control abilities that rely on a region of the brain known as ‘prefrontal cortex’. Her recent work, including a paper in the journal Science is affecting early education practices around the world. Diamond will respond to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Adele Diamond


A tour of the exhibitions on display in Spanish led by photographer Avelina Crespo.

 

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Guided Visit in Spanish | Avelina Crespo


Canadian Art Magazine Spring Launch
Saturday, April 12, 6–8pm
Join us for the launch of the new edition of the magazine.

Kevin Schmidt
Saturday, April 12, 5.15pm
As part of our contribution to the city wide Canadian Art Gallery Hop, this year artist Kevin Schmidt will lead a walking tour and discussion of the ideas and themes present in his exhibition.

In 2013, the CAG took  part in a schedule of events throughout the city. CAG Director, Nigel Prince gave a talk about our current exhibitions on display including works by Erin Shirreff, Nancy Holt and Raymond Boisjoly.

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Gallery Hop Vancouver 2014 | Talk by Kevin Schmidt & Magazine Launch


Join us for an afternoon of unconventional drawing at the Contemporary Art Gallery as part of the city-wide initiative DRAW DOWN.
Responding to the current CAG exhibitions by Erin Shirreff and Nancy Holt, visitors will develop their own drawn-on-film animations and flipbooks.
The CAG has invited Cineworksto present collaborative drawing-on-film and flipbook drop-in workshops for all ages. Working with filmmakers Zoe and Ariel Kirk-Gushowaty, participants will create their own simple animations on film, projected live in the gallery.Zoe Kirk-Gushowaty is a Vancouver based interdisciplinary artist working with photography, experimental filmmaking, video and sound. She received her BFA in 2008 from Concordia University in Montreal and currently manages the Cineworks analog darkroom and experimental lab with her sister Ariel by offering open darkroom nights, hands on workshops and performance/screening events. Zoe’s work has been shown in Canada, U.S. and Japan, her solo recording project Night Sides was released in April 2013 by Fixture Records.

Ariel Kirk-Gushowaty is a photo-based artist and film-maker living in Vancouver. Along with her sister Zoe, she manages the Cineworks Analogue darkroom and experimental lab space, and was a co-organizer of the Vancouver Darkroom Co-op from 2009-2011. Ariel has a BA in Philosophy and Cinema Studies from the University of Toronto, and a Photography Certificate from Langara College. She has worked with many types of alternative process photography and filmmaking, and also teaches digital storytelling. Ariel is currently completing a short film shot on 16mm film, and producing an event at the Cineworks Annex in collaboration with Art Waste. Her work has been shown in Canada and internationally.

Cineworks Independent Filmmakers Society is an artist-run production and exhibition centre that supports independent filmmakers and media artists. Through initiatives that foster dialogue and experimentation with cinematic practices.

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Drawing Experiments on film | Draw Down 2013


Y-CAG

New Y-CAG starts in November!

Free Launch – Wednesday, October 16 – 5:00 pm at the CAG
Program Runs – Two Wednesdays each month from November, 2013 – May, 2014
Cost – $350

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Information Sheet

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Application Form

Y-CAG offers youth interested in contemporary art, visual culture and exhibition-making the opportunity to work closely with leading artists, curators, gallery staff and educators. Co-hosted by the Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Y-CAG will offer a behind-the-scenes look into both institutions, through gallery and facility visits.

Students will engage in discussions focusing on contemporary cultural issues; participate in the production of publications, events and presentations; and gain experience producing, installing and documenting artwork. Work produced in the program will culminate in a student-initiated ‘exhibition in print’.

  • Meet bi-weekly and build relationships with other creative teens, Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design staff, and visiting museum professionals and artists;
  • Identify interests and questions and use these to explore art through a variety of means, from looking, researching, and discussing to art making;
  • Place contemporary art within the context of what is going on in the larger world; and
  • Work with a variety of people and teen peers to create a public art exhibition or event.

Cost

The cost of the program is $350 for the entire six months and includes refreshments at each session.

Schedule

Teens will meet twice a month from 4:00 – 7:00 PM two Wednesdays of every month for afterschool meetings facilitated by educators and art professionals. Meetings will alternate between the CAG and Emily Carr.

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Y-CAG launch event


William Wood is an art historian and critic concentrating on the history of conceptual art and contemporary Canadian and international work in photography, moving pictures and installation. Starting as a critic and editor with C Magazine, Vanguard, Parachute and Public, Wood went on to a doctorate at the University of Sussex and has taught at universities in the United Kingdom, Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario. Recent publications include essays for Ian Wallace: At the Intersection of Painting and Photography and Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965–1980. Forthcoming are writings on The Piano, an exhibition held at the Art Gallery of Alberta this past summer, and Michael Morris: Letters for the Helen and Morris Belkin Art Gallery. For his Feedback talk Wood will address his remarks to the theme of the para-photographic as it relates to the James Welling exhibition and other artists working with photography.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | William Wood


Kathy Slade works with embroidery, sound, sculpture, books, film and video. Recent exhibitions include: It was a strange apartment full of books …, Galerie Au rue 8 saint bon, Paris; IS EVERYTHING GOING TO BE ALRIGHT?, Audain Gallery, Vancouver; Cue: Artists’ Video, Vancouver Art Gallery; and Die Perfekte Ausstellung, Heidelberger Kunstverein. Additionally Slade collaborates with Brady Cranfield on two ongoing projects The Music Appreciation Society, and a music group that has produced two concept albums 12 Sun Songs (2009, Or Gallery and Christoph Keller Editions, Zürich) and 10 Riot Songs (2011, Presentation House Gallery, North Vancouver). She will be responding to the work of Kay Rosen.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Kathy Slade


Jem Noble’s practice encompasses digital image-making, sound, sculpture, performance and text and is concerned with questions of framing, indeterminacy and co-production. Among recent projects he has given a performance-lecture for the European Arts Research Network at dOCUMENTA (13); created image, text and audio work in conjunction with Bruce Nauman’s Days at the ICA, London; made structural edits of 1988 feature films Ghosts of the Civil Dead and They Live, screened at Arnolfini, Bristol, UK and The Engine Room, Wellington, New Zealand; and painstakingly recorded music from the internet in real-time over three months to DJ at Manifesta 7 in Trentino in collaboration with Swedish anti-copyright activists Piratbyrån. He has also undertaken several commissioned collaborations with Turner Prize 2012 winner, Elizabeth Price, producing sound and music for her large-scale video installations. Noble is founding member of the Blackout Arts expanded-cinema collective (2002–2010) and was co-director of Venn Festival of new and exploratory music and sound between 2004 and 2008.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Jem Noble


Krisztina Laszlo holds a cross-appointment at the University of British Columbia as the archivist for the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery and the Museum of Anthropology. Her research interests include artist’s archives, curatorial and artistic interpretations of the archive, cultural property and preservation of media art. She received a Master of Archival Studies from the University of British Columbia and also holds a Certificate in Public History and a Bachelor of General Studies from Simon Fraser University. Laszlo will discuss a series of slides produced by archeologist and anthropologist Wilson Duff now held in the MOA collection referenced by Mike Nelson in his new commission Eighty Circles through Canada (The Last Possessions of an Orcadian Mountain Man), 2013. Commissioned in partnership with Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff Centre.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Krisztina Laszlo


This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

Karol Sienkiewicz
Tuesday, August 20, 7pm

Karol Sienkiewicz is a Polish art critic and art historian, currently based in Vancouver. He has contributed essays and reviews to numerous publications, including dwutygodnik, Spike, Camera Austria, Art Agenda and more recently Decoy and Canadian Art. Together with Kasia Redzisz, he has just published Świadomość (Neue Bieriemiennost), the group involving artists such as Miroslaw Balka active in Warsaw during the 1980s. He is currently working on a new publication focusing on the ‘critical artists’ in Warsaw in 1990s, placing their work in the context of recent Polish transformation. Sienkiewicz’s talk will consider Warsaw’s 10th-Anniversary Stadium as seen through the lens of contemporary art, the site serving as a transient symbol of historic changes, economic transformation and social relations and a specific reference for Sosnowska’s sculptures exhibited at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

 

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Feedback Talk | Karol Sienkiewicz


This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

In response to the exhibition Itee Pootoogook, Buildings and Land, Crosby will discuss some aspects of her PhD research, which focuses on the formation of Aboriginal cultural production in urban spaces in Vancouver, B.C., for Native and non-Native publics; these include diverse forms of performativity, the display and sale of Aboriginally produced objects, and urban community supports by well-known First Nations artists through their association with new Aboriginal social organizations.

Marcia Crosby is currently completing her PhD in the Department of Art History and Visual Culture, UBC, and also works as an independent scholar. Crosby has a BFA in Fine Arts and English Literature, and an MA in Art History, UBC (1993), her MA thesis focused on the tension between representations of Aboriginal cultures and peoples in the public sphere, the work of Indigenous art and artists, and representations of Aboriginal title in B.C.

In addition to teaching literature and Native Studies at Vancouver Island University for 16 years, she has worked as a researcher, reviewing Aboriginal programs in public institutions. Her current work as a PhD candidate at UBC, builds on the curatorial work completed for the exhibition and accompanying publication, Nations in Urban Landscapes (Contemporary Art Gallery in 1994 and which toured to Oboro, Montréal, 1996), and the more recent exhibition: Aboriginal art in the city: Fine and Popular (2008), which is one of several web projects produced through the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, as part of Ruins in Progress: Vancouver Art in the Sixties. More recently in 2012, she co-curated with Karen Duffek, The Paintings of Henry Speck: Udz’stalis at the Belkin Satellite Gallery, Vancouver.

Next in the Feedback series:

Kathy Slade
Tuesday, July 23, 7pm

Karol Sienkiewicz
Tuesday, August 20, 7pm

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Feedback Talk | Marcia Crosby


Sosnowska discusses her practice drawing on a range of key recent projects.The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first exhibition of work by Polish artist Monika Sosnowska in Canada. Best known for her ambitious architectural and sculptural installations which simultaneously embrace and resist the spaces they occupy, Sosnowska’s exhibition will obliquely reference her hometown of Warsaw and the economic shift that has occurred since the collapse of communism in 1989 to the present day.The Monika Sosnowska exhibition opens on Thursday June 27 and continues until August 25.
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Artist talk | Monika Sosnowska


Join us over the summer at the Field House Studio for free drop-in art activities for all ages responding to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and our current CAG exhibitions: Monika Sosnowska, Itee Pootoogook and Kay Rosen.

Saturday, July 27, 1–4pm
Saturday, August 24, 1–4pm

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Field House Studio | Saturday Family Days


Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly hosts a talk and discussion with Nathan Crompton.

Nathan Crompton co-editor of The Mainlander, will speak about the history of the land where Vanier Park and the Burrard Marina Field House are located, previously the Kitsilano Reserve. 2013 marks the 100 year anniversary of the dispossession and displacement of the reserve.

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Field House Talk | Nathan Crompton hosted by Raymond Boisjoly


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery and supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.This summer the CAG launches a new talks program inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.Artists in Public Speaker Series:Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard MarinaLanglois will discuss his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design.http://www.brokencitylab.org/projects/
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenue

http://eblast.matchboxcreative.com/t/ViewEmail/y/098F9E3307BEFE89/2D08E80B14EDBD63F6A1C87C670A6B9F

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Field House Studio - Artists in Public: Speaker Series | Justin A. Langlois


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery and supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.This summer the CAG launches a new talks program inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.The first talk presents collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who are currently working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They will discuss this series of workshops which invite the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Artists in Public:
Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Saturday, June 22, 4pm

http://unlearning-weekenders.tumblr.com/

Next up:
Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm

Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenue

http://eblast.matchboxcreative.com/t/ViewEmail/y/098F9E3307BEFE89/2D08E80B14EDBD63F6A1C87C670A6B9F

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Field House Studio - Artist in Public Speaker Series | Zoe Kreye & Catherine Grau


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support and nurture artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launches a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
The first talk presents collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who are currently working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They will discuss this series of workshops which invite the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois will discuss his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Join us on the Field House Studio balcony for free drop-in art activities for all ages responding to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and our current CAG exhibitions.

Saturday, June 29, 1–4pm
Saturday, July 27, 1–4pm
Saturday, August 24, 1–4pm

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

Raymond Boisjoly, As It Comes continues until June 16 and is located in the window spaces at the CAG and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line and The Burrard Marina Field House Studio Residency Program.

As It Comes at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program — IntransitBC.

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Field House Studio - Summer Programs


Night School is a series of informal lectures and studio visits that are intentionally accessible, yet intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent contemporary visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Guest instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world during four lectures and a suggested reading list complementing the discussion program.

Night School participants will also be involved in studio visits with three, internationally recognized, Vancouver-based artists. Steven Shearer, Geoffrey Farmer and Liz Magor have all held important exhibitions at the CAG and their projects will be introduced during the previous lecture. These field trips will be paired with cocktail events.

Night School offers direct access to and dialogue with artists and curators in the city. Alongside its curriculum, a passport of local events, openings and lectures will provide an expanded perspective on the Vancouver art scene plus opportunities to build a greater appreciation of art production and presentation in the city.

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Night School


Artist collective bgl discuss their work and their exhibition Marshmallow + Cauldron + Fire = at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, April 2009.

Congratulations to bgl who will represent Canada at the 2015 Venice Biennale.

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Video | bgl - To represent Canada in the 2015 Venice Biennale


Artist Mike Nelson discusses his practice and his exhibition and two new commissions at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Video by Derek Brunen with installation photography by Scott Massey.

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Video | Mike Nelsoon


Congratulations to British Columbia born artist Erin Shirreff on WINNING! the AIMIA | AGO Photography prize.

Scroll below, to listen to her artist talk, delivered earlier this year during her exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Kelowna born Shirreff presented a talk on her exhibition Pictures and discussed her interest in differing encounters between representations of image and object. Erin Shirreff’s solo exhibition, Pictures,  at the Contemporary Art Gallery was the first presentation dedicated exclusively to the artist’s film and video work.

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Artist Talk | Erin Shirreff - Winner of the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize 2013


Y-CAG

New Y-CAG starts in November – still time to sign up!

Program Runs – Two Wednesdays each month from November, 2013 – May, 2014
Cost – $350

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Information Sheet

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Application Form

Y-CAG offers youth interested in contemporary art, visual culture and exhibition-making the opportunity to work closely with leading artists, curators, gallery staff and educators. Co-hosted by the Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Y-CAG will offer a behind-the-scenes look into both institutions, through gallery and facility visits.

Students will engage in discussions focusing on contemporary cultural issues; participate in the production of publications, events and presentations; and gain experience producing, installing and documenting artwork. Work produced in the program will culminate in a student-initiated ‘exhibition in print’.

  • Meet bi-weekly and build relationships with other creative teens, Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design staff, and visiting museum professionals and artists;
  • Identify interests and questions and use these to explore art through a variety of means, from looking, researching, and discussing to art making;
  • Place contemporary art within the context of what is going on in the larger world; and
  • Work with a variety of people and teen peers to create a public art exhibition or event.

Cost

The cost of the program is $350 for the entire six months and includes refreshments at each session.

Schedule

Teens will meet twice a month from 4:00 – 7:00 PM two Wednesdays of every month for afterschool meetings facilitated by educators and art professionals. Meetings will alternate between the CAG and Emily Carr.

MORE

Y-CAG Program with ECUAD


Randy Lee Cutler is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Visual Art + Material Practice at Emily Carr University. As a writer, artist and educator she is invested in the emergence of new cultural forms and expression. In addition to working on an ebook on the metaphor of digestion, Randy is exploring the geological and virtual potential of crystal formations. Drawn from Gilles Deleuze’s writing on cinema, crystal circuits suggest a spectacular form for both the making and experiencing of an art object. The crystal — though empty and transparent — is a flashpoint for symbolic intensities. Launching from Erin Shirreff’s exhibition, Cutler will share her research into crystals.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series talk | Randy Lee Cutler: Crystal Circuits


Bancroft has been a practicing artist in Vancouver for over thirty years. National and international exhibitions include those at the Vancouver Art Gallery and at the Centre Culturel Canadien in Paris. She is represented in the collections of the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography (the National Gallery) in Ottawa and the Canada Council Art Bank. In addition to photography, her work has included text, sound, drawing, sculpture and more recently, video. Her current interests are the intersections of the photographic image with history, music and mapping strategies in relation to representations of landscape. Bancroft is an Associate Professor at Emily Carr University, where she has been teaching since 1981. She is a member of the board of Artspeak Gallery and is represented in Vancouver by Republic Gallery.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture

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Feedback Series Talk | Marian Penner Bancroft


Lisa Schmidt is a curator at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin. She worked previously at K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf and with Ute Eskildsen at Museum Folkwang, Essen.

Her talk focused on her most recent exhibition, Das Kind, die Stadt und die Kunst (The Child, the City, and the Art), on view at the Schmela Haus of the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen until 15 September, 2013 which examines the social and aesthetic implications of playgrounds by the Dutch architect Aldo van Eyck, with contemporary responses by artists Yto Barrada, Nils Norman and Gareth Moore.

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Curator Talk | Lisa Schmidt


Speaker Series: Artists in Public

This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

The first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who worked on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They discussed a series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Read here about the Unlearning Weekenders Project on the Goethe blog.

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Field House Artists in Public Speaker Series - Zoe Kreye & Catherine Grau


Erin Shirreff on Art 21, New York.

 

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Video | Erin Shirreff


Nancy Holt and Ben Tufnell discuss Holt’s major exhibition ‘Photoworks’ at Haunch of Venison London.

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Video | Nancy Holt


Romanian artist Ciprian Muresan discusses his work. Presented in collaboration with Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Ciprian Muresan


Artist Ciprian Mureşan discusses his exhibition ‘Recycled Playground’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, February 8 to April 7, 2013. Video by Brian Lye.

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Video | Ciprian Muresan


Colin Browne’s most recent book of poems, ‘The Properties’ is the prompt for this special Feedback talk. Readings and discussion points from Colin Browne led an inquiry into the idea of ‘documentary’ in relationship to the works on display. Colin Browne is a filmmaker, writer, film historian, a professor of film in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University, and a poet who has been nominated for the Governor-General’s Award for Poetry.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Colin Browne: Readings and Talk


Dominic McIver Lopes is a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at UBC, President of the American Society for Aesthetics, a member of the British Society of Aesthetics, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. He is also co-editor (with Berys Gaut) of Wiley- Blackwell’s New Directions in Aesthetics. His work focuses on pictorial representation and perception; the aesthetic and epistemic value of pictures, and the ontology of art. He is working on two books entitled Beyond Art and Four Arts of Photography. Tonight he explores taste and suggests new ways of thinking about contemporary art practices.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Dominic McIver Lopes: Acquired Taste - What's the point?


Iglika Ivanova is an Economist and Public Interest Researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. In her talk both her personal and professional world play a part as she encounters Ciprian Muresan’s work. Born and raised in Bulgaria she understands the shifting global politics in the global world as well as a need for radical change in the local communities. Ivanova holds an MA in Economics from the University of British Columbia and a BA in Economics from Simon Fraser University.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Iglika Ivanova: From East to West


Artist Nathan Coley discusses his exhibition Knowledge, Kindliness and Courage at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver and the off-site work We Must Cultivate Our Garden, November 23, 2012 to January 20, 2013. Video by Brian Lye.

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Video | Nathan Coley


Artist Liz Magor explored her current interests focusing on her experience with re-enactors, who perform a cycle of repetition in their quest to be affiliated with a larger group. Magor is an Associate Professor in Visual Arts at Emily Carr University, her sculptural work involves ordinary or familiar objects often refashioned. She has shown internationally at Documenta and at the Venice Biennale.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Liz Magor: Desire of the Individual


Am Johal is a community developer who works at SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement having previously worked on the Vancouver Agreement in urban economic and social development, as a political advisor, in human rights and as a freelance journalist with Inter Press Service. He was the cofounder of UBC’s Humanities 101 program and was Chair of the Impact on Communities Coalition. He is on the Steering Committee of SFU’s Centre for Dialogue, is a member of the Vancouver City Planning Commission and a board member with the Vancity Community Foundation. He is a part-time doctoral student in Media Philosophy at European Graduate School in Switzerland. In his talk he considers how his work is affected by the critical engagement of the art work on display at the CAG.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Am Johal: The Politics of Community


Prompted by the exhibition of work by Nathan Coley, artist Jin-me Yoon examined questions concerning identity, place and subjectivity in an accelerated globalized era in relation to her practice. These include the consequences for reconsidering power and ideas of progress, and the means for slowing down signification and extending temporality. What are the aesthetic, social and political implications of absence and the void as a paradoxical space ‘full’ with presence and necessary doubt?

Jin-me Yoon is a Professor of Visual Studies at Simon Fraser University and represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Jin-me Yoon: The Void and Temporality


Los Angeles based artist Matthew Monahan gives a formal lecture on his work exploring the major themes in his practice. This talk coincided with Monahan’s first solo exhibition in Canada and highlights Monahan’s interest in the interplay between two and three dimensions, between drawing and materiality, infused with personal mythology and a self reflective look at the conventions of museum display.

Presented in partnership with Graduate Studies at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Matthew Monahan


Artist Matthew Monahan is interviewed by Curator and Educator Heidi Reitmaier about his work and his exhibition ‘Matthew Monahan’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, April 27 to July 1, 2012. Video by Adrian Buitenhuis

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Video | Matthew Monahan


Renowned art historian and writer, former chair at UC Santa Cruz and the University of California, Catherine Soussloff is the former Head of the department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at UBC, ignited a conversation drawing from the disciplines of historiography, theory and philosophy.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Catherine Soussloff: Death, Benjamin and Melancholy


Anthropologist, curator and UBC Professor Nicky Levell’s interests are located in the interdisciplinary folds of anthropology, theoretical museology, material culture and critical curatorial studies. She responded to Matthew Monahan’s work.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Nicky Levell: Art Through Anthropology


Artist Peter Gazendam drew from his own practice as he toured the Matthew Monahan exhibition, and talked about the many practices of sculpture and its contemporary relationship within history and art.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Peter Gazendam


Prompted by Josephine Meckseper’s work, artist and writer Gareth James speaks to the theoretical and experimental methodologies that underpin his own practice to investigate the artistic considerations which emerge when one artist considers the work of another.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Gareth James: The One and the Many


Artist Josephine Meckseper discusses her work and her exhbition American Leg at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, May 2012.

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Video | Josephine Meckseper


This video interview with Irish artist Sarah Browne was created by Jessica Foley to coincide with the exhibition ‘How To Use Fool’s Gold’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, July 13 to September 2, 2012.

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Video | Sarah Browne


Landon Mackenzie: Map Room; The Act and State of Drawing. As part of Draw Down 2012, the city wide initiative, artist and educator, Landon Mackenzie orchestrated a day of drawing for visitors at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Rooted in her own practice and critical thinking, Mackenzie invited everyone to explore the potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being. This event was made possible with kind support from Opus Art and Framing.

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Workshop | Draw Down 2012


Artist and writer Frances Stark discusses her feature length animation film ‘My Best Thing’, shown at the Contemporary Art Gallery from Feb 3 to April 15, 2012.

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Video | Frances Stark


Chris Lee, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at UBC is interested in the trans-specific circulation of artistic practices and cultures. Prompted by Xu Zhen’s work and in particular his role as a contemporary Chinese artist, Chris Lee drew from his own theoretical concerns to consider the role of Chinese migrations and identities in comparative, transnational and artistic frameworks.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Chris Lee


Amber Frid-Jimenez is an artist and recently appointed Associate Professor at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Her talk explored the latent intersections between design, technology and contemporary art. Trained in design and media arts at the MIT Media Lab, her current and recent research and teaching affiliations include the Jan van Eyck Academie in the Netherlands, the MIT Program for Art, Culture and Technology, and the National Academy of Art & Design in Bergen, Norway.

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Amber Frid-Jimenez: The Line Between Them


American artist Sharon Hayes discusses her exhibition In The Near Future at the CAG, April 8 – June 5, 2011.

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Video | Sharon Hayes


Artist Corin Sworn discusses her exhibition ‘Endless Renovation’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver from November 17, 2011 to January 15, 2012.

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Video | Corin Sworn


Artist Jeppe Hein discusses his work and his exhibition Please Please Please at the Contemporary Art Gallery, January 2009.

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Video | Jeppe Hein


Danish Artist Jeppe Hein discusses his work and his CAG exhibition Please Please Please in an artist talk held at Emily Carr University of Art + Design on Friday January 30, 2009. The talk is introduced by Christina Ritchie then Executive Director of the CAG and curator of the exhibition Please Please Please.

links: www.jeppehein.net

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Artist Talk | Jeppe Hein


Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Jeppe Hein


Lawrence Paul Yuxwelupton discusses his exhibition NEO-NATIVE DRAWINGS AND OTHER WORKS: LAWRENCE PAUL YUXWELUPTUN.

MAR 19, 2010 to MAY 16, 2010, curated by Petra Watson.

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Video | Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun


This teacher’s guide is designed to support teachers who wish to carry out lessons related to the genre of Portraiture and the exhibition Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Neo-Native Drawings and Other Work in their classrooms. 

Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun


A time lapse video of Scott Massey’s exhibition Aurorae in the Contemporary Art Gallery windows. The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the first major exhibition of Vancouver artist Scott Massey. With discrete works sited in the windows and at the Canada Line station, Massey linked both locations through two new pieces dealing with shifts in notions of time and place and the mutable connections between them.

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Video | Scott Massey


Federico Herrero discusses his CAG exhibition “Vibrantes”, September 9, 2011 to January 15, 2012.
Video production by Adrian Buitenhuis.

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Video | Federico Herrero


Roy Arden discusses his exhibition UNDERTHESUN at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver Canada.

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Video | Roy Arden


This video, Roy Arden: UNDERTHESUN was made to coincide with the exhibtion of the same name at the Contemporary Art Gallery from January 28 to March 27, 2011.

Video by Adrian Buitenhuis

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Video | Roy Arden - UNDERTHESUN


Elizabeth McIntosh discusses her work and her exhibition Violet’s Hair at the Contemporary Art Gallery, November 2010.

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Video | Elizabeth McIntosh


Eli Bornowsky Interviews Elizabeth McIntosh (Part 1 of 2)

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Video | Eli Bornowsky & Elizabeth McIntosh (Part 1)


Eli Bornowsky interviews Elizabeth McIntosh on the occasion of the exhibition – Eli Bornowsky: Walking, Square, Cylinder, Plane - November 26 – January 22, 2011
© Contemporary Art Gallery, The Western Front and The Artists, 2011.

 

 

 

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Video | Elizabeth McIntosh & Eli Bornowsky (Part 2)


Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Playing Homage


Artist Alex Morrison discusses his work and the group exhibition Following A Line at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, September 2010.

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Video | Alex Morrison


Artist Brad Phillips discusses his work in the exhibition Triumphant Carrot: The Persistence of Still Life, June 2010.

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Video | Brad Phillips


Artist Kelly Lycan discusses her work in the exhibition Triumphant Carrot: The Persistence of Still Life, June 2010.

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Video | Kelly Lycan


Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Sentimental Journey


Lesson plans for for grades K-3, 4-5 and 8-12 based on work by Tim Gardner.

Canadian artist Tim Gardner is well-known internationally for his figurative works based on personal snapshots of family events, vacations with friends and day to day activities.  Mostly realized as intimate and precise watercolor paintings and oil pastel drawings, his early work used photographs of his older brother and friends as source material, capturing the sometimes excessive leisure activities of these post adolescent men engaged in sporting activities or partying. For his solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery, his first in Canada, Gardner placed new emphasis on the landscape and watercolour. In this new work, the landscape became a place to formally engage with the properties of watercolour as a medium that offers a unique immediacy.

Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Tim Gardner


Dexter Sinister discuss the exhibition An Invitation to An Infiltration, 2010. An ideal context for an examination of the competitive nature of group exhibitions was during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Organized by guest curator Eric Fredericksen, An Invitation to An Infiltration was a group exhibition of local and international artists ranging from emerging to established.

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Video | Dexter Sinister


Holly Ward discusses her work in the group exhibition An Invitation to An Infiltration, 2010. An ideal context for an examination of the competitive nature of group exhibitions was during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Organized by guest curator Eric Fredericksen, An Invitation to An Infiltration was a group exhibition of local and international artists ranging from emerging to established.

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Video | Holly Ward


Teachers guide and lesson plans for for grades K-3, 4-5 and 8-12 based on work in the exhibition An Invitation To An Infiltration.

Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | An Invitation To An Infiltration


Aritst Elizabeth Zvonar talks about her work and her exhibition On Time at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, November 2009.

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Video | Elizabeth Zvonar


Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Elizabeth Zvonar


Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

MORE

Resources for Teachers | FASTWÜRMS - DONKY@NINJA@WITCH


Are you a teacher looking to further educate your class about one of our exhibitions? Or, maybe you are planning a field trip and would like some further guidance.

Teachers’ Guides support educators who wish to visit the CAG with their students or who wish to carry out lessons related to CAG exhibitions in their classrooms. They include artist biographies, thematic exhibition overviews, suggested points of discussion, as well as recommended readings and references.

Lesson Plans are designed to bring the resources of contemporary art and artists to diverse classrooms. It is our goal to introduce students of all ages to the richness that engaging with contemporary art brings. Such breadth and diversity show that it can be used as a meaningful springboard in teaching a variety of subjects. Please feel free to adapt lessons to suit the specific needs of your class and curriculum.

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Resources for Teachers | Clip/Stamp/Fold 6


On Thursday, December 12th, the Point Grey Secondary grade twelve, Art Careers class visited the Contemporary Art Gallery for a full day workshop. 

They spent the day exploring James Welling’s exhibition The Mind On Fire with a focus on studying curatorial practice and conceptual art practices.  As part of the investigation they undertook an experiential response to Welling’s working methods, by conducting a photo-shoot in which students were asked to explore in-camera abstraction techniques. They spent their lunch hours creating images while exploring downtown Vancouver. 

The students were interested in questioning our assumptions of perception and the photographic image, as well as how the inherent ambiguity affected the reading of an image. The students met afterward to discuss and edit the images and categorize them based on the abstraction technique or subject matter of the photographs.  In effect the students curated an exhibition of photography, taking a cue from Welling in grouping images based on intended effect.

The CAG is excited to present a selection images of their work, see above for a slide show. A big thank you to the whole Point Grey HS  Art Careers class and the artists we are presenting here: Kiel Torres, Catherine Wang, Cosette Bote, Aly Slobadov, Nancy Tseng, Forever Young, Kevin McAllum. They’ve posted more images on their Point Grey Art Blog.

The CAG welcome groups of all ages and levels for free guided visits. We also produce guided visits with art-making responses to the exhibitions on display.

Contact s.dacey@contemporaryartgallery.ca for more information.

- Shaun Dacey, Curator of Learning and Public Programs

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Brains ‘A’ flame: Point Grey High School’s response to James Welling’s “Mind on Fire”


Fresh in town from originally Windsor, via Montreal, Justin Langlois gave a talk at the Burrard Marina Field House about his ideas and his work on Saturday, August 17th. He brought with him a pamphlet of thought-provoking slices of his personal and artistic philosophy, which he flipped through over the duration of the talk as a prompt for further musings and discussion. He’s happy to share it with us in the images above, along with a video he made titled ‘Windsor is Forever’.

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Limits & Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life – by Justin Langlois


Nathan Crompton hosted by Raymond Boisjoly
Burrard Marina Field House
Saturday September 28, 4 pm

This year marks 100 years since the dispossession of the Kitsilano Reserve, a year the city of Vancouver has also declared  the Year of Reconciliation.

Local writers Nathan Crompton and Maria Wallstam wrote an article in The Mainlander called City of perpetual displacement: 100 years since the destruction of the Kitsilano Reserve in July of this year. It explores the relationship between the rampant gentrification of the DTES & Grandview-Woodlands, and the colonial settlers’ unjust treatment of indigenous populations in the early 20th century. The article piqued the interest of our current Burrard Marina Field House artist in residence, Raymond Boisjoly, who identified that the Kitsilano Reserve discussed in the article is located in the exact same spot as the Burrard Marina Field House (1655 Whyte Avenue) where he’s been working for nearly six months. Throughout his residency at the Field House Boisjoly has been interested in the history of the land the Marina sits on. Crompton’s research and response to the dispossession of the Kits reserve aligns it with the current rash of forced evictions of low income residents in the DTES. A link can be drawn between Boisjoly and Crompton through their evocation of histories as a way to engage urgent current dialogues in the community.

For more detailed maps and history of the Kitsilano Indian Reserve lands go to UBC’s Indigenous foundations online mapping tool http://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/home/land-rights/mapping-tool-kitsilano-reserve.html.

- More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Nathan Crompton talk at the Burrard Marina Field House


Today at the Burrard Marina Field House! (Saturday September 28th at 4 pm)

Nathan Crompton co-editor of The Mainlander will be speaking  about the history of the land where Vanier Park and Burrard Marina Field House are located, previously the Kitsilano Reserve (Crompton co-wrote an article about the reserve here).   This year marks 100 years since the dispossession of the Kitsilano Reserve, a year the city of Vancouver has also declared  the Year of Reconciliation .

Our Field House Intern (Jaclyn Bruneau) interviewed Crompton about the article and his upcoming talk this past week. Here is an excerpt where Crompton draws out the analogus connection between the history of the dispossessed land and current situations in the city. We will be posting the rest of the interview in the coming days.

Jaclyn Bruneau: Your article in The Mainlander draws attention to the linkage between the kinds of aggressive colonialist displacement and dispossession that took place 100 years ago in 1913, and the accelerating gentrification happening in Gastown, the DTES, and extending as far as Grandview-Woodlands. What kinds of excuses or justifications are people making for these new developments that render such a seemingly obvious linkage invisible? You cite a The Province editorial is titled, “The sooner the Downtown Eastside is cleaned up the better” which touches on this.

Nathan Crompton: I think that “cleaned up” is a telling choice of words in this case. What the editors of the Province want today is what they have always wanted as they lean in on the benefits of a capitalist, colonial society while disavowing the consequences of displacement, exclusion, endemic unemployment in the cities, etc. Our article tries to draw on old Province editorials. There is a 1903 editorial calling for the displacement of the Kits reserve, which describes the First Nations settlement in familiar terms, as an “eyesore” that should be removed because it does not maximize the financial value of the land.

It is important to read those old articles, because despite the passage of time they resonate with our troubled present. What the Province wants to “clean up” is of course the same communities that have been resisting and surviving since the beginning of colonial settlement. This is why the proposed cleaning is so deeply political and social. The cleansing of Vancouver’s low-income neighborhoods is a social cleansing, and we need to look beyond the realm of ideology and discourse to identify the process. The “proposals” being put forward by the Province already being acted upon by the real-estate developers and the police, so we have the white press, the State and capital, each forming their own part of the eternal recurrence of colonialism.

Be sure not to miss Nathan’s talk today at 4pm at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Nathan was invited to speak by our current CAG Field House at Burrard Marina artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Interview with Nathan Crompton (Part 1)


This is Part III of an interview with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly and CAG Field House intern Jaclyn Bruneau. Preceding Part III was a Part I and II. Check ‘em out.

Afternoons with Raymond – PART III

JB: Can you talk a little bit about how your own heritage relates to your work? I know you’ve talked about challenging these more classical, traditional ways of representing indigenous cultures.

RB: Well it does come to inform my work, but not in any simple way. I have made works that sort of trade on traditional imagery. I’m always sort of concerned with making sure that the work doesn’t come to be mistaken for the thing it represents. I’m interested in my capacity as an indigenous artist to be able to make work about indigenous issues that doesn’t simply reduce that to me making work about indigenous issues because I am myself indigenous.
I would like to think that I am also making work about these things because they’re important to everyone. They concern certain circumstances that we’re all in the midst of that come to impact us in uneven ways. So it becomes something that I definitely want to make accessible in a way that is about it coming to have this capacity to communicate something of that experience but in a strange, unfamiliar, unforeseen way.

So my heritage comes to influence that and it’s kind of about seeing a certain possibility in that, in terms of making contemporary art that doesn’t have to come close to aboriginal cultural practices as it is known, but could potentially work towards creating some sort of intuitive change to things or a subtle way of actually just letting material come to do something in and of itself. It’s a complex process in that—in a lot of works, my heritage isn’t necessarily readable in it and I’m interested in that discrepancy, where it becomes sort of, like, a furtive presence. It ultimately requires a certain activity to understand that relationship.

JB: What other cultures have affected you and influenced your work?

RB: A lot of things I’ve been interested in have been about the analyses of subcultures. I look to music a lot. I look at a lot of things that primarily address ideas of cultural transformation as represented through popular music, like the strange idea that both funk and heavy metal are derived from rhythm and blues in a way that each musical form was subtly transformed in a certain transitional process to communicate to a particular audience at a given time and place, but somehow leads to these very divergent forms.

So I’m really interested in that thing where it scarcely becomes that thing that it’s going to be. At least, looking at funk and heavy metal—not specifically cultures, but subcultural forms—becomes an interesting analogy between, at least for me—in terms of trying to understand that process—simply conceiving of an artistic practice isn’t about knowing what it is but realizing that my work can come to transform my understanding of things I have done previously.

JB: What does digital culture have to do with all of this? I’m thinking about the LightJet prints that were on display in March and April which you created by dragging your iPhone around a flatbed scanner as it played musical performances from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Is there a particular comment you’re making by converging these multiple electronic processes of new and old?

RB: So they’re prints made by laser exposing the piece of paper. It’s processed like any photograph, so I guess that melding becomes a strange thing of finding some other sort of way to show the manner in which photography can index time. In a lot of cases, strangely, many of the scans that I made scanned right to left rather than left to right, so it creates these weird tensions that might not be visible. But I like that strange thing in which these different technologies come to function—that they can be used in these ways that they weren’t necessarily intended to be used for; to create some image of these different types of image-making. The ipod on the scanner leaves this layer in between the two of them—the dust and scratches on the glass, so it’s this strange thing of there being a depicted sort of material and an actual material, somehow.

I’m hearing all these stories about children’s intuitive use of touch screen technology that comes to affect the way that they expect printed magazines to function. It leads me to think of that strange thing where our encounter with visual material just creates this different relationship we have to it that is about interacting with it; seeing a certain capacity with it to touch it to make it work.

I think that process of using the ipods and the scanners means to—well, that easily manipulable aspect of it to hold an ipod in my hand—it’s sort of about stressing that physical manifestation of it. That it persists as an object that can be used in these weird ways. So it’s just a present capacity of an ipod and a scanner to produce an image in a very ad hoc way.

JB: Tell us about some of the books on your shelves.

RB: [Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language], I’m looking at it because I’m teaching a course that is ostensibly about text-based art. The book is this really amazing thing—there are chapters in it that deal with the use of geological metaphors and biological metaphors in our understanding of language… so the idea that a language could be said to die as being a biological metaphor. Looking at shifts, thinking of the way in which language shifts where two languages can come to encounter one another and have subtle effects on one another is often discussed in terms of geology. So it’s a really amazing in the sense that it finds all this incredibly rich imagery in the way people sort of discuss language; and what people expect of it.

JB: How does it read?

RB: It’s quite academic, but really kind of a fascinating thing in the sense that it’s episodic. I know a lot of these started as individual articles—like, H & Co. was first published in Cabinet. So it reads very easily in the sense that it’s not very demanding and fairly short and accessible. So it’s a really incredible book that I’ve been returning to for quite a while and that I’m excited to finally be able to share with students.

JB: Where are you at with the course?

RB: I’m teaching it at Emily Carr and there’s a lot of planning to do for it this month [August].

JB: What else have you got in that pile?

RB: [chuckles] What else?

JB: Show me one more.

RB: Well, there’s this incredible Jimmie Durham catalog—A Matter of Life and Death and Singing. [Begins flipping through the book and does not stop until his response concludes]. This is part of a career-long retrospective. It’s this incredible document that is exciting in the sense that it seems tied to a lot of these other things, like a collection of his poetry and critical writings that are also coming out, but he’s just someone that I really admire and it’s nice to see this kind of extended document concerning his career.

JB: Thank you so much for your time.

RB: No problem.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part III


Another sunny Saturday brought lots of folks ’round for our 3rd and final Family Day of this summer season. Ros offered a step-by-step demo of how to create functional pinwheels of all shapes and sizes. There were lots of different papers, from patterned origami to neon construction, and some sparkly pipe cleaners to add that final zing. Thanks to everyone who came out for our Family Day series this summer and we hope to see you all soon.

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Family Day – Pinwheel Making at the Field House


This summer the CAG launched a new series of talks at Burrard Marina Field House inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

The first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who worked on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (the project was by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They discussed a series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Read more here about the Unlearning Weekenders Project on the Goethe Institute blog.

Watch the Goethe Satellite video below of the talk at the Field House, video by Ash Tanasiychuk (http://www.formatnoauto.com).

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Watch the Unlearning Weekenders Video – now live!


Take a look, above at a selection of images from the previous two family day Saturday events, held at the Burrard Marina Field House. Don’t miss joining in the next family day event on Saturday, August 29, from 1-4 pm!

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Making art at the Field House – Fun in the Sun


I spoke with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly, who was on the other side of the big pond, and he took a few minutes to fill me in about where he was, and what he was up to.

Where are you right now?

I am in Manndalen within Sápmi, the land of the Sami people that extends across Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula of Russia.

What are you doing there?

I am attending Riddu Riđđu, an indigenous arts festival that has been running for 22 years.

What comes to your mind about being there?

Having been gifted a book of Sami proverbs, I found this: “When in a new country, follow its ways.”

Have you seen any art you want to tell us about?

Yesterday I was told about a house here in Manndalen built to spite local Norwegian authorities following the Second World War. Anton Sjåbakken built a house from scraps found from various sources. The Norwegian government want to tax him and collect the equivalent of one years wages for this provisional shelter. Sjåbakken wrote a letter outlining his frustration which also gave the house the name by which it is now known: The Shit Hell Fucking House.

Tell me about a meal you’ve enjoyed…

I have been enjoying traditional dried reindeer meat.

… and a reason you wouldn’t want to leave?

The midnight sun provides many good working hours, I often see people simply going about their business at absolutely any time of day.

- Thanks Raymond, see you back in Vancouver, Jaclyn.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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A few things about Norway from Raymond


Collaborators, Catherine Grau and Zoe Kreye met while attending the MFA program in Public Art and New Artistic Strategies at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany. It was here that the conceptual basis for their artistic practice was born. Along with a group of about 15 others’ recently spent an afternoon with them at the Burrard Marina Field House. While sitting on the Field House lawn overlooking a view of hundreds of boats, they gave a full overview of their most recent project, Unlearning Weekenders.

Over the duration of the talk, we were introduced to the notion of ‘unlearning’. Grau and Kreye shared texts and theories that influenced them in the development of their project and their own approach to ‘unlearning’. Through their ideas they sought to reassess, deconstruct, look within, or question the things considered to be ‘given’ in our culture.

They spoke of the desire to imagine and make gestures toward decolonizing and deinstitutionalizing today’s monochromatic educational and economic systems. They discussed the ways our current systems fail to address individuals, our hominal wants and needs; how they divide us from our bodies and how they prevent us from knowing ourselves in a way unobstructed by the dogmas that tell us how to be. Zoe illustrated this by mentioning that in every level of our education and work (middle school, high school, post-secondary, professionalism) we involve our bodies increasingly less.

Responding to these ideas, Grau and Kreye’s research led them to forms of physical movement and dance in an ‘attempt to replenish themselves’ from the rigor of both creating and giving.

Throughout the talk the artists shared their experiences, including, developing a 12-hour procession through the city with various local community groups and individuals. Numerous activities occurred through this procession, including: a stick-listening event at Third beach; a backwards walking procession underneath Canada Place; walking across Burrard Bridge all tied to each other and burying themselves in the sand while listening to one participant reading Some Thoughts on the Common Toad by George Orwell.

A good portion of the audience were participants in the weekend procession (hence the Weekenders part of the title). Their presence enriched the discussion with meaningful reflections, questions and contemplations. The artists were receptive and enthusiastic about the insights, and seemed to be mentally banking them for future consideration as they move forward.

I left full of appreciation, excitement and hope about the process of inquiry and making earnest attempts to cultivate a kind of purity of the self. Throughout the talk, I realized their work could not be separate from who they are, their research and the way it feeds into their art, is about shedding the cultural sludge that becomes attached to us. This was epitomized by their relaxed attitude to the occasional sound of planes overhead. They simply paused and waited for it to pass.

For more information on the project, check out their website.

This artist talk was the first of many that will take place at the Field House. We’ll be hosting Family Days on Saturday July 27 and August 24, 1-4 pm. If you want to make sure not to miss anything, keep an eye on our Twitter, Facebook, and get on the mailing list (scroll to the bottom right on the page) to receive our updates.

- Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver.

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Field House Update: Unlearning Weekenders Artist Talk – Catherine Grau & Zoe Kreye


Hello one and all,

I’m Jaclyn Bruneau, the CAG Field House intern currently working with Raymond Boisjoly during his summer artist-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. I’ll be keeping people in the loop about his activities, and with Field House events by reporting in this blog. Look for posts with the ‘Field House Studio’ blog category and keep your dials tuned in.

A few Saturdays ago, Raymond and I spent the afternoon at False Creek Community Centre where he led a workshop as part of the Vancouver Draw Down, that very cool single-day drawing festival that invites Vancouverites to access various types of drawing workshops for free, held in over 23 locations city wide. The workshop was titled Re-Inventing Drawing and began invitingly with tables scattered with pipe cleaners, masking tape, paper cups, tree branches, string, scissors, pieces of paper big and small, and a ton of markers all of which were used together or separately to create fantastically experimental gestural marks on paper.

Our first two visitors were a pair of twins named Alex and Liam, who seemed to have made use of all the materials. They taped felts all around the parameter of the paper cup; strung together branches, attaching a pen on each end and then twirling the contraption above paper; and stuck felts through holes in foamy paper. Their mom seemed blown away at all the things they came up with. Some others made contraptions with the branches that allowed two people to each take hold of a part of the branch, and proceed to see if they could collaboratively render an image they thought up together beforehand. Raymond even drew my attention to a mystery visitor who got carried away with their new tools on the hardwood floor (oops!). Above are some photos from the workshop.

During the afternoon’s workshop the space was flooded with natural light and we left the doors wide open, so people walking the path outside could peek in and join. We met daughters and dads, kids in strollers, couples, best friends, and even a few grandparents. It was amazing how little instruction everyone needed. They seemed full of ideas, and were very eager–especially those itching to fill their Draw Down passports with stamps. I floated around taking photos and getting people started. Raymond seemed to know exactly what to say in the way of inspiration for those stuck for an idea.

- Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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News from the Field House & fun with Draw Down!


New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées

Did you know that there is a free guided visit at the CAG almost every week during an exhibition? | Savez-vous qu’il y a une visite guidée chez la galerie d’art contemporain presque chaque semaine au cours d’une exhibition? (lisez ce poste en français).

The CAG team has worked very hard to ensure that guided tours are scheduled regularly throughout the course of our exhibitions, and that dedication has given recently given birth to a new series of tours starting this month: multi-language guided visits. For the first time ever, our guided visits are now offered in Mandarin and Spanish!

I have been proud to present our guided visits in French for the past 3 exhibitions, taking over from artist Patricia Huijnen following her return to Switzerland last year. It’s been a real pleasure for me, as I love the French language and often lament that I do not have the chance to speak it as much as I would like. I also love talking about art, and the opportunity to do so at the Contemporary Art Gallery is both challenging and satisfying. Contemporary art can be difficult to understand at first glance, and bringing context, new ideas, and new ways of thinking to visitors has been, for me, an incredibly rewarding privilege.

When I was in school, it was always a struggle to fully appreciated fine-arts field trips when the exhibitions weren’t being presented in the language in which we were being instructed. My teachers would be diligently providing us with French vocabulary and tools with which to engage with the art, but when it was time to visit a gallery, museum or event, it was often jarring to listen to tours in English. There was something really special about the tours that were offered in French.

When Shaun Dacey, our new Curator of Learning and Public Programs, joined the CAG team in April, I wrote to him to tell him about how much I loved working in French at the CAG. Imagine my delight, when he not only echoed my enthusiasm, but informed me that he was already working to add additional language tours to the schedule.

Tommy Ting hosts CAG guided tours in MandarinI attended the Mandarin tour, hosted by artist Tommy Ting, on Saturday the 18th, and was delighted to see the engagement in our visitor’s faces while they discussed and engaged with the work in their own language. While I was unable to make the following week’s tour, hosted by photographer Avelina Crespo, I have been told it was well attended and equally well received. Both Tommy and Avelina have agreed to join us again later this summer to again present Mandarin and Spanish language tours at our upcoming exhibition.

I am truly proud to be part of the team providing multi-language tours at the CAG. I invite you to join me on June 1st at 3PM for my guided visit, in French, of the Nancy Holt/Erin Shirreff exhibition currently on display at the CAG.

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a Vancouver illustrator, and proud volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

♦ ♦ ♦

L’équipe à la galerie a beaucoup travaillé pour s’assurer que les visites guidées sont programmées régulièrement tout au long de nos expositions, et ce dévouement a donné récemment naissance à une nouvelle série de visites ce mois-ci: des visites guidées multilingues! Pour la première fois, nos visites guidées sont maintenant offerts en mandarin et en espagnol!

Je suis fière d’avoir organisée nos visites guidées en français pour les dernières 3 expositions, succédant à l’artiste Patricia Huijnen après son retour en Suisse l’année dernière. Cela a été un réel plaisir pour moi, comme je suis amoureuse de la langue française et se plaignent souvent que je n’ai pas la chance de parler (ou d’écrire) en français autant que je le voudrais. J’aime aussi parler de l’art, et l’opportunité de le faire à la galerie d’art contemporain est à la fois stimulante et satisfaisante. L’art contemporain peut être difficile à comprendre au premier vu, et apportant le contexte, des nouvelles idées, et de nouvelles façons de penser à nos visiteurs est, pour moi, un privilège extrêmement enrichissante.

Kay Slater mène une visite guidée en français du travail de Nathan Coley.

Mon français est devenu assez rouiller après avoir pas eu la chance de l’utiliser quotidiennement, mais j’espère que mon passion pour l’art et pour la langue le compense.

Tommy Ting leads a guided tour in Mandarin at the CAG. 18 Mai, 2013Quand j’étais à l’école, c’était toujours difficile d’apprécier des excursions beaux-arts lorsque les expositions n’ont pas été présentées dans la langue dans laquelle nous étions instruits. Nos enseignants seraient diligents en nous fournir le vocabulaire et des outils pour s’engager avec l’art, mais quand il était temps de visiter une galerie, une musée ou un événement, il était souvent choquant à entendre des visites guidées en anglais. Il y avait quelque chose de vraiment spécial dans les visites qui ont été offerts en français; c’était peut-être simplement parce qu’ils étaient si rares, mais peut-être c’était également comment facile c’était à comprendre et à apprécier ces œuvres.

Quand Shaun Dacey, notre nouveau curateur de l’apprentissage et des programmes publiques, a rejoint l’équipe CAG en Avril, je lui ai écrit pour lui dire combien j’adore travailler en français au CAG. Imaginez ma joie, quand il a non seulement fait écho à mon enthousiasme, mais m’a informé qu’il travaillait déjà à ajouter d’autres visites en plusieurs langues à l’horaire.

J’ai participé à la première visite guidée en mandarine, organisée par l’artiste Tommy Ting, et j’ai été ravi de voir l’engagement dans les visages de nos visiteurs pendant qu’ils ont eu la chance de discuter et de s’engager avec le travail dans leur propre langue. Tandis que je n’ai pas pu participer à la visite guidée en espagnol la semaine suivante, organisée par le photographe Avelina Crespo, on m’a dit qu’il a été bien fréquenté et tout aussi bien accueilli. Tommy et Avelina ont accepté de nous rejoindre cet été pour présenter à nouveau des visites en mandarin et en espagnol à propos de notre prochaine exposition.

Je suis vraiment fière de faire partie de l’équipe offrant des visites multilingues à la CAG. Je vous invite à me rejoindre le 1er Juin à 15 heures pour ma visite guidée, en français, de l’exposition Nancy Holt / Erin Shirreff présentement exposée au CAG.

 

Kay Slater (@ kdot) est une illustratrice de Vancouver, et bénévole à la Galerie d’Art Contemporain. Venez la rendre visite tous les dimanches de midi à 15 heures.

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New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées


CAG Volunteer Dan Potter writes about his experience participating in Scarcity Radio Vancouver a project developed with artist Sarah Browne. CAG volunteers and teens from the IGNITE! Mentorship Program at the Cultch, Vancouver, worked alongside a group from VIVO Media Arts Centre, Vancouver as well as with individuals from Slow Boat at Ikon Gallery, UK producing a series of sound-works for broadcast on the Scarcity Radio internet channel www.scarcityradio.org/radio.

This unique project included sound artists, economists, geographers and others exploring the notion of scarity and produced a series of experiences that ask questions about the world around us. Dan Potter writes:

When I was first invited to be a part of the Scarcity Radio project I asked myself what are elements in my day to day life that are scarce? Although I came up with a few answers to this question I found it difficult to pin point any necessities I wouldn’t be able to track down and implement. Over the course of a few condensed meetings we as a group explored these concerns with various artistic and social economic practitioners.

For me, our first meeting with artist Sarah Browne provided the most guidance as we talked from many angles on what scarcity is and how this concept could be applied to a radio art project. One of the points made that I found interesting was this idea of scarcity can only exist within a value system that governs quantity. So what is scarce really depends on our perceived notion of what is desired or at least what we consider a necessity of a comfortable life. This concept fits in with the exhibit How to Use Fool’s Gold where Sarah Browne gets us as viewers to examine our economic value system in order to see it isn’t an absolute power but is built and evolves according to what we put emphasis on in regards to our shared values of wealth and prosperity.

Pretty soon we all started making audio recordings of various events with the purpose of editing them into sound pieces that would be eventually broadcast on a pirate radio station operating out of the UK. This idea of using the AM/FM band as part of public display influenced my decision on what to record. In a world full of iPods and Wi-Fi connected audio streams the word RADIO immediately brings to mind certain social phenomenon in our society that are slowly going extinct and being replaced by a new normality.

Consequently, I decided to make recordings of myself and my family sitting at the dinner table having a conversion whilst eating our evening meal. I took the mundane discussions on where the food was bought and the hysterical slightly drunk laughter and manipulated snippets of them to create a sound piece that would move in and out of reality. Some chewing sounds were looped together to create a rhythmic pattern of excessive gobbling noises and cavernous reverb effects were applied to the end points of dialogue in order to initiate a sense of disappearance.

I wanted to hit upon the scarcity of family relations especially that of a nuclear family and the luxury of easy availability of food in western society. When all was said and done it turned out to be a quick project with not a lot of time to over think which happily kept things spontaneous and unexpected. I also enjoyed hearing what other artist participates had recorded as there was a great diversity of sounds and approaches that when played together will definitely spook any unsuspecting radio listeners over in the UK.

Dan Potter

This program was made in collaboration with Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, VIVO Media Arts Centre and Slow Boat, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK.

Always Waiting for Words – Corey Ratch

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When you become the Scarce!


Thank you to everyone who came to Sarah Browne’s talk on Saturday July 14th. We were delighted to welcome an excellent attendance to the gallery.

The event was timed to correspond with Sarah Browne’s exhibition, How To Use Fool’s Gold, which opened on Thursday July 12. During her talk, Browne spoke on the economic structures and social relations that are intrinsic to her work. The exhibition is titled after the work,  How to Use Fool’s Gold (Pyrite Radio) (2012), a crystal radio which collects the broadcasts that fill the air around us, a metaphor for those things of value that go unseen, revealed by a mineral mistaken as a precious commodity. The piece is the first work encountered, visitors are able to listen in on headphones.

This survey exhibition is Dublin-based artist Sarah Browne’s first exhibition in North America, the exhibition continues until September 2, 2012.

A full colour publication How To Use Fool’s Gold, accompanies the exhibition for the special exhibition price of $30. It includes essays by Tessa Giblin, Curator of Visual Arts, Project Arts Centre Dublin and artist Jeremy Millar. Also available are three more publications on Sarah Browne, A Model Society: Patterns & Thoughts, Sarah Browne/IrelandVenice and Lebensreform in Leitrim all available for sale at the gallery. For more information on all the publications visit: http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/#news

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Artist Talk by Sarah Browne


Last Saturday was Vancouver Draw Down. The event took place in multiple locations all over town and it was great day. I hope you had a chance to get out and participate in some of the stations set up around the city. I managed to take in 6 of the 18 locations and one of my stops was naturally the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Artist and Educator, Landon Mackenzie, transformed the gallery’s street front, foyer & hallways into a “Map Room.” Based on her work, Landon invited everyone to explore the “many potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being.”

The place was packed when I arrived. Every table was covered with works in progress as visitors created collages from pieces of topographical print-outs.

When visitors were done they were invited to sketch the Monahan pieces in the BC Binning Gallery, examining form and mark making.

This was the 3rd year for Vancouver Draw Down and I can’t wait for the next. The event celebrated drawing and invited everyone to participate by simply making a mark. As the Vancouver Draw Down site says “If you can write your name, you can draw!”

I saw another great quote posted by Opus Art Supplies encouraging people to dispell their preconceptions: “If you hear a voice within you say – you cannot paint, then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced.” van Gogh

The same goes with drawing!

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

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Vancouver Draw Down: the Map Room.


Thanks to all who attended Catherine Soussloff’s engaging discussion last Tuesday. She brought together the theoretical concepts of  Walter Benjamin’s writings and thoughts in relation to Matthew Monahan’s work. It was a successful start to the many conversations the CAG will be hosting with cultural and critical producers  in the coming weeks for our “Feedback Series.”

Please join us again next Tuesday May 15 at 7pm, for Anthropologist, curator and UBC professor Nicky Levell’s discussion entitled, “Art Through Anthropology.” She will be responding to Monahan’s work through the interdisciplinary folds of anthropology, theoretical museology, material culture and critical curatorial studies. Looking forward to seeing you then!

Karina Irvine

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Catherine Soussloff on Benjamin and Monahan


Tonight at 7pm art historian and writer Catherine Soussloff gives a talk that launches a new round of events at the CAG, titled the “Feedback Series.”

This new series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

Catherine Soussloff will respond to Matthew Monahan’s work presenting a talk entitled, “Death, Benjamin and Melancholy.”  She will address disciplines of historiography, theory and philosophy in a conversation with the audience.

Thank you to those who attended the CAG’s opening last Thursday, April 26th for Matthew Monahan’s first exhibition in Canada. The exhibition will be on view until July 1, 2012.

As of today, Tuesday, May 1st, the CAG has extended its hours and is now open from Tuesday – Sunday, 12pm until 6pm. There are now more opportunities to visit and explore Matthew Monahan’s work at the CAG.

Image: Matthew Monahan, installation view at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. Courtesy Anton Kern Gallery and Stuart Shave/Modern Art. Photo: Karina Irvine.

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New Talks at the CAG: Feedback Series – Tonight at 7pm: Catherine Soussloff


Matthew Monahan is interviewed for Life on Mars the Carnegie International in 2008. Matthew Monahan’s first Canadian solo exhibition opens at the Contemporary Art Gallery on Thursday April 26 and continues until July 1, 2012.

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Matthew Monahan opens tonight at the CAG


On Sunday April 1st at the CAG, Tate Modern curator  Mark Godfrey gave an engaging talk on Frances Stark’s practice in relation to her work My Best Thing to over 100 visitors.  Frances Stark’s My Best Thing is a feature length animation film currently on view until Sunday April 15. Here are some images of the event taken by CAG volunteer Jamie Dolinko.

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A full house for Mark Godfrey’s talk on Frances Stark


Join us at the Contemporary Art Gallery on Saturdays at 3pm for a series of guided visits and public discussions on our current exhibitions. Recent discussions, led by Neil Campbell and Carla Nappi, have focused on Guo Fengyi’s work now on view until April 15th, 2012. Their talks ranged from issues relating to artistic process to traditional methods of Chinese healing and medicine. Guo Fengyi began drawing as a form of healing within the practice of Qi-qong, referring to her work as ”painted perscriptions.” Over the course of twenty years her drawings evolved to engage relationships between history and myth, and knowledge and mystery.

This upcoming Saturday Keith Wallace, editor of Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art, will expand further on Guo Fengyi’s work in the context of art in China. The following Saturday, March 24th, The CAG’s Executive Director Nigel Prince, will  give a Guided Visit.

In the following weeks we are offering guided visits of all our exhibitions, including Frances Stark’s My Best Thing and Scott Massey’s Aurorae. On March 31 CAG volunteer and educator Patricia Huijnen will give a tour in French and on Sunday, April 15 (the last day of the exhibitions) Jill Henderson, CAG Gallery Coordinator, will present.

Admission is free so please join us for this series of discussions on Saturday afternoons plus one Sunday. Conversation is encouraged and all are welcome! Please visit our website or contact j.henderson@contemporarygallery.ca for more information.

Curatorial Intern – Karina Irvine

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Every Saturday at 3pm!


Please join us on Saturday December 3rd at 3 pm at the CAG to launch the latest participatory offsite project expanding our current exhibition into the streets of Vancouver.

Federico Herrero’s vivid and dynamic new commission in the Contemporary Art Gallery’s façade, Vibrantes, is the inspiration point for our latest offsite project. Encapsulating the social nature of Herrero’s artistic practice, rooted in the display of work in the public realm, the project allows participants to generate their own compositions, blocking colour across the city’s buildings via a special program.

Through the screens of your smartphones, visitors will be able to view a potential and unfolding mural, occupying the digital space around the gallery and expanding into nearby streets. Users can then explore the surrounding area where they will be able to uncover series of coloured shapes with which to create virtual paintings in surprising locations.

Digital clusters of differing colours will shift and change dependent on the user’s position and viewpoint, allowing each person their own unique version of a mural in virtual space. Participants will be encouraged to compose and then share their digital paintings by taking screenshots and uploading these images to Twitter under the project hashtag: #CAGOFFSITE. All photographs will be credited and published on Contemporary Art Gallery affiliated media including this blog and the Facebook page, establishing an evolving community as we paint the town.

Get there at 3pm and be one of the first forty participants who will receive a coloured vinyl shape inspired by Herrero’s mural. With only one piece per person available, bring friends and family to create a cluster you can install on your walls at home.

www.contemporaryartgallery.ca.
Hours: Wed. – Sun. 12 – 6 pm. FREE ENTRY

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Vibrantes: Offsite Participatory Project: Saturday Dec 3, 3 pm


Stop by the CAG tomorrow at 3pm for a guided visit of the exhibition: Thomas Bewick, Tale-pieces, led by Executive Director Nigel Prince. While you are here you can also visit:  Corita Kent,  To create is to relate, both exhibitions run until October 30th, 2011.

Guided visits occur regularly throughout our programming, they are always free and they provide a great opportunity to develop new skills to interpret the art or to simply take a closer look at the exhibition.

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Guided visit tomorrow!


We’ve had a very eventful week here at the CAG. In Celebration of our 40th anniversary and the opening of our Current Exhibition we’ve held not one, not two, not three, but four fun events! It’s been pretty great (albiet a tad exhausting for some of our dedicated staff).

On Wednesday September 7th we held a donors preview and screen printing workshop. We were lucky enough to have thirteen of Corita Kent’s original screens to combine in any way guests pleased. Everyone was provided with preprinted cloth aprons to protect their fancy wares and Meggan Winsley from Malaspina Printmakers was on hand to help guests pull the  screens. Best of all, everyone who participated got to walk away with their very own Corita Kent inspired print.

Present as well were members of the University of British Columbia Opera. In ode to Corita’s influencial friends (Charles and Ray Eames, Buckminster Fuller, and John Cage to be counted among them), Heather Malloy and Rebecca Paulding performed two of John Cage’s lesser known songs (and by that I mean lesser known than the famous Four minutes, thirty three seconds), Number Sixteen from Song Books and Aria.

The following night welcomed a crowd for the official opening of our current Corita Kent, Thomas Bewick, and Federico Herrero exhibition. What began as a typical art opening (what does that really mean, anyways?) quickly turned into a full blown party.

Members of the UBC Opera performed for a second time, and as the lights dimed everyone loosened their shirt collars to dance to the musical stylings of DJ David Wisdom. The loading bay was tranformed into party central with cupcakes provided by Coco cupcakes, goody bags, a Corita Kent inspired stamp station, personalized crepe paper ‘hats’ for the especially festive guests, and a slideshow showing exhibition documentation from our last 40 years in operation.

The week’s events wrapped up on Saturday with Family Day. We were pleased to welcome children, big and small, to come and see the new exhibition, print t-shirts, and hold a Happening/Parade. With newly minted Corita Kent inspired shirts and banners, guests and musicians took to the streets on one of the warmest days of the summer to celebrate art and life.

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Preview, Opening, Birthday, Family Day, Oh my!


Tomorrow afternoon at 4:55 pm there will be a guided visit of our current exhibitions Beyond Guilt – The Trilogy and In the Near Future led by CAG curator, Jenifer Papararo. This special guided visit is part of the Canadian Art Foundation’s Gallery Hop Vancouver. For information on the other events going on at galleries around the city visit canadianart.ca/vancouverhop.

Photos by Scott Massey

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Guided Visit Tomorrow!


This week is National Volunteer Week and the CAG takes its hat off to our dedicated team of over 50 volunteers. We thank them for their valuable gift of expertise, amazing energy and dedication.

As Gallery Coordinator I consider myself privileged to work alongside volunteers who fulfill so many necessary roles in the organization. It might be a surprise to some to discover the sheer diversity of their backgrounds. This has encompassed occupations ranging from students, artists, teachers, architects, librarians, marketing professionals and designers through to treaty negotiators! In recognition, I would like to share with you a series of profiles that highlight the interests, backgrounds and experiences of these dedicated individuals.

What brought you to volunteer at the CAG?

I love contemporary art!  I think that there is nothing that can relay various life experiences and different perspectives better then art.  It really is the best storyteller.  So being an artist since the age of two, I decided to get a post secondary education in art and pursue it as a career.  That meant I was looking for “experience”, but also something fun relating to art which made me want to get involved with the CAG.

 What is your favorite thing about your volunteer position at the CAG?

I like talking with the various gallery visitors.  I have had some interesting  chats.  I also like my position in that I am the first person who people get a chance to talk to after they have seen the exhibit.

What and where was the first Contemporary Art work that you experienced?

It was at the Vancouver Art Gallery on a school field trip.  I was quite young, in early elementary school.  I remember seeing a piece hung on the gallery wall which consisted of a single straight line pointing upwards.  It must have been Barnet Newman or something else like his work.  But I remember I didn’t get it!  I couldn’t see the point for a creation of such simplicity hanging in a museum!  I guess my abstract mind was still developing.  Of course now I understand and enjoy the intricate use of meaning in all disciplines of contemporary art.

 What other creative activities do you do?

I am of course an artist in that I paint and draw with a focus on creativity and experimentation.  I compose and record various genres of music by playing several different instruments, but my main musical focus is playing the guitar.  I also write about art by including my various musings on life as they pertain to a particular art exhibition taking place around town. Check out Dan’s blog here: http://we-all-get-it-in-the-end.blogspot.com/

Thank you Dan for sharing! More profiles coming soon.

- Jill Henderson

Here are some favourite pics of our volunteers in action:

 

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Volunteers rule at the CAG


Last week during a lively guided visit to the exhibition Following A Line, students from Clinton Elementary School, Burnaby and their teacher came up with a long list of ‘deep thinking questions’ about what they saw and heard in the exhibition, here is a list of their top ten questions;

1. Why is the picture two different things ?

2. Why did the artist choose to put these two things together ?

3. Is this a painting or an actual book ?4. Where does this picture take place?

5. Why did the artist chop up the body?

6. Why does it look like some people are frozen?

7. Why are they different colours ?

8. Why is it white inside ?

9. Why is there a hand on his head?

10. What are these things ? They look like ropes and they look like nets.

If you would like to book a group on a guided visit please contact j.henderson@contemporaryartgallery.ca

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10 Questions


Last  Saturday September 25th  at 4 pm,  artist Peter Gazendam took a group of 14 on a well paced walking tour, visiting four downtown public sculptures, the walking tour was an event related to his work in the current CAG exhibition Following A Line, on view until November 7.

“The impetus for Peter Gazendam’s casual walking tour of four of Vancouver’s public sculptures is A Saloon KeeperA Newspaper, Two Wars, A Doorman. This new work, which is a founding part of the group exhibition Following A Line, uses as its base a series of collages made from snapshots of innocuous and modest, yet somewhat odious, public sculptures that the artist encountered in his daily routes through the city.  Like the collages, which Gazendam has cut out of their environment and recomposed, he further fragmented the sculptures by discussing their partial histories and formal properties through a highly subjective lens.”

Following A Line also includes work by Pablo Bronstein, Susanne Kriemann, Kyla Mallett, Alex Morrison, Frances Stark and Paul Sietsema, and runs until November 7, 2010.

Photography: Aquiles Ascencion

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Walking with Peter Gazendam


Book the library

The Abraham Rogatnick Library

Abraham Rogatnick (1923-2009) was a Member of the Board of Directors of the Contemporary Art Gallery for many years and Honourary Chair of the CAG’s Capital Campaign to establish its current facility. The CAG’s library is named in his honour in recognition of his long-standing dedication and support. Abraham recognized the unique character of the CAG’s exhibition program, saying it ‘fills a critical gap that other public and private institutions in the city cannot accommodate.’

The library plays a primary role in supporting the mandate of the CAG. It is a reference only collection of over 4,000 items consisting of exhibition catalogues, monographs, periodicals and ephemera, which facilitate and support CAG learning programs and the research of contemporary art. As these are often produced in limited runs, it provides a critical and rare resource. The library is available to the public by appointment, to book a visit use the form on this page. To search the library type in the fields below.

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T 00 1 604 681 2700
F 00 1 604 683 2710

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  • Closed on British Columbia statutory holidays
  • The galleries are wheelchair accessible
  • The Gallery is free of charge
  • Suggested donation of $5


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