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Film screening

Patrick Staff
The Foundation
February 12 to April 24, 2016
Alvin Balkind Gallery and off-site

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents The Foundation, a new and expansive body of work by artist Patrick Staff, their first solo exhibition in Canada. The project, which centres around a major film installation but also comprises sculpture, print, and text, explores queer intergenerational relationships as they are negotiated through a body of historical materials. The film combines footage shot at the Tom of Finland Foundation in Los Angeles—home to the archive of the erotic artist and gay icon and a community of people that care for it—with choreographic sequences shot within a specially constructed set.

The legacy of Finnish artist Touko Laaksonen (1920-1991), better known as Tom of Finland, spans multiple generations; his work made a considerable impact on masculine representation and imagery in post-war gay culture. The foundation was established in 1984 by Tom and his friend Durk Dehner to preserve his vast catalogue of homoerotic art, whilst endeavouring to – to quote the organization’s website – ‘educate the public to the cultural merits of erotic art and in promoting healthier, more tolerant attitudes about sexuality.’ Today, Durk runs the organization and lives in the house, along with a handful of other employees and artists.

Rather than focusing on Tom of Finland’s work, Staff’s film evokes the foundation as a set of relations. It explores how a collection is formed and constituted and the communities that produce and are produced by a body of work. Through observational footage of the house, its collections and inhabitants, the foundation is revealed as a domestic environment, a libidinal space, an archive, an office and a community centre; a private space which is also the home of a public-facing organization and the source of a widely dispersed body of images. In the work, Staff foregrounds their own identity and personal dialogue with the different communities of the foundation to consider how ideas of inheritance and exchange are complicated by gender identity and presentation; in this context, of a younger trans person within a context dominated by the overtly masculine, male identity of an older generation. The documentary style footage of the foundation is intercut with a series of scenes, which are shot in a set incorporating aspects of the building’s architecture and technologies and operate within the register of experimental theatre. These sequences, featuring interactions with an older actor, use choreography and prop to explore the body as a site for the construction and deconstruction of subjectivities.

Through a varied, interdisciplinary and often collaborative body of  work comprising film, dance and performance, Staff considers ideas of discipline, dissent, labour and the queer body, frequently drawing on the historical narration of counter-culture, radical activity and alternative forms of community building. This new work is the product of several years’ research and dialogue with the Tom of Finland Foundation and is Staff’s most ambitious and large-scale project to date, bringing together languages of film and live performance with sculptural materiality to explore the body as a political, living archive. The Foundation explores the complexities of cultural artifacts and collective identities, via an examination of ownership, appropriation, responsibility and desire.

For Vancouver CAG has developed a new broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities. The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Paige Sarlin and Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide, in Vancouver, as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

The Foundation is co-commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London; Spike Island, Bristol; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; and Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. Co-produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London and Spike Island, Bristol.

With thanks to the Tom of Finland Foundation.
The Foundation is supported by Arts Council England Grants for the Arts, The Elephant Trust and the Genesis Prize.
The broadsheet publication and screening project is supported by The British Council.

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Patrick Staff - The Foundation


Throughout spring and summer 2015 the CAG hosted a series of artists-in-residences, each continued research toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2015–2016. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program were an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Australian artist de Souza investigates the politics of space informed through a formal training in architecture combined with her experiences such as squatting in Redfern, Sydney. De Souza’s work emphasises participation and reciprocity, and often involves the process of learning new skills and fostering relationships to create site and situation-specific projects. For over ten years she has self-published her hand-bound books and ‘zines under the name All Thumbs Press.

In Vancouver, De Souza is developing a series of community based workshops throughout 2015-16 engaging participants in a critical dialogue regarding local food production. De Souza is working closely with various local urban farmers, food security activists and community members to explore the food politics within the city as both evidence of and a metaphor for urban displacement through gentrification.

In 2013, de Souza developed projects for the 5th Auckland Triennial, 15th Jakarta Biennale and the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. More recently, at the Delfina Foundation, London, she hosted a series of picnics held inside an inflatable tent installation designed to fit within the gallery space. Notionally “traditional” English food such as cucumber sandwiches, Cornish pasties and Ploughman’s Lunches were made linking to specific cultural histories as a way to discuss class, privilege, space and colonialism. As picnickers ate and spoke, de Souza mapped the discussion on the floor creating a giant cartography of the conversation. Also in 2014 she completed a residency with KUNCI Cultural Studies Center in Yogyakarta, Indonesia working closely with community organizers and residents of Kampung Ratmakan to create an inflatable ghost house and a film featuring drawings by local children made during a ghost story workshop. Their local government had announced a major development plan affecting the Ratmakan area and the squatters residing there started to be displaced. The area is built on a graveyard so ghosts are constantly appearing to the residents, ongoing exorcisms by the local ghost expert, paralleling their own evictions in the living world.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Keg de Souza


Opening: Thursday, February 28 – 7-10pm
All welcome.

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents Medium-Based Time by Berlin-based Canadian artist Jeremy Shaw, featuring a black and white 16mm film of transgender voguer Leiomy Maldonado, an HD video installation that reworks archival ethnographic film into a dystopian science fiction narrative, and a new series of light-activated UV prints in the windows of our street façade.

The exhibition centres on Variation FQ (2011-13), in which Shaw worked with legendary voguer Leiomy Maldonado to produce a film that explores aspects of subculture, dance, gender, power and special effects. “Vogue” is a primarily black and latino, gay subculture that evolved out of the drag balls of New York in the 1980s and includes a fluid, yet raw dance style based around miming the poses of models from high fashion magazines.

The film sets Leiomy starkly lit against a black void performing her signature freestyle dance teetering between elegance and violence. As the film progresses, Shaw introduces step-and-repeat style visual effects, originally created by Canadian animator Norman McLaren in his 1968 ballet film Pas de deux. In Pas de deux, this optical printing technique embellishes the seduction between a male and female ballerina as typically choreographed for the stage. In Variation FQ, the use of special effects creates a ghostly layering and repetition of Leiomy’s image in her most virtuosic gestures and extends the experience of abandon evident in the consequences on her human body. Leiomy’s performance is accompanied by Shaw’s original soundtrack that combines a minimalist piano score with contemporary chopped and pitched audio techniques. This merging of classical composition with manipulated pop a cappella MP3’s is emblematic of Shaw’s fascination of the interdependence between high and low taste cultures.

Shaw’s practice amplifies conceptual strategies within the transcendence-seeking experiences of popular culture, as well as in the speculative nature of scientific mapping of these phenomena. In keeping with this ongoing interest in and around altered states, we premiere Quickeners (2014), a pseudo-documentary that puts the role of truth telling into crisis.

Set five hundred years in the future, Quickeners tells the story of Human Atavism Syndrome (H.A.S.), an obscure disorder afflicting a tiny portion of the Quantum Human population to desire and feel as their Human Being predecessors once did. A species wirelessly interconnected to The Hive, Quantum Humans have evolved to operate solely on pure rational thought and they have achieved immortality. Quickeners is set against a cinéma vérité aesthetic, reworking archival documentary footage from a gathering of Pentecostal Christian snake handlers to illustrate the story. As the film unfolds, an authoritative Quantum Human narrator comments on what we witness: indecipherable testimonials, sermons, songs, prayers, convulsive dancing, speaking-in-tongues, serpent handling and ecstatic states that Quantum Humans define as “Quickening”.

Incorporating elements of science fiction, ethnographic survey, neuroscience and belief systems, Quickeners collates these disparate themes into a succinct whole to discuss varying notions of evolutionary progress with clinical indifference. This alchemical fusion suspends belief of the fantastic situation by its use of familiar, outmoded technology, meticulous audio editing and subtitles. As the piece builds to a cathartic climax of media techniques and special effects – caught in limbo between ritual documentary and music video – the Quantum Humans surrender to this evolutionary throwback of perceived biological transcendence, while the film attempts to incite a similar phenomenological response in the viewer.

Alongside these film/video works in our window vitrines hangs Degenerative Imaging (In The Dark) (2015), a new series of light-activated, glow-in-the-dark vinyl cut-outs that reference star and planet stickers. Though presumably designed with the aspiring child astrologer’s bedroom in mind, these stickers are also commonly found adorning the walls and ceilings of the teenage psychonaut; more likely used to “trip out” than to plan a trip. Rather than the cosmos, Shaw’s source material comes from 3D SPECT scan renderings of the degenerative effects of cumulative mind-altering substance use on the blood flow and metabolism of the human brain. The representational language of neuroscience, or at least the populist aesthetic familiar in health and pharmaceutical advertising, is reformatted here as a mechanism to enhance altered states while viewing their supposed biological effects on the brain. The prints are charged by fluorescent light once per hour, causing them to glow strongly and then fade, glow and fade; static time-based mediums on repeat.

Variation FQ is generously loaned by the Rennie Collection, Vancouver

Quickeners was co-produced by the Contemporary Art Gallery with the Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève for the BIM 14 and Johann König, Berlin, with the generous support of a grant from BC Arts Council: Special Project Assistance – Innovations; the Fmac and the FCAC.

Exhibition is supported by Inform Interiors and Best Film Service Inc.

This exhibition forms part of the Capture Photography Festival, running from April 2 to 29.

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Jeremy Shaw - Medium-Based Time


The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes is a group exhibition of recent film and video that seeks to interrogate notions of uncertainty within the documentary format. Work by ten artists engages with the conventions of source footage, narrative voice and re-enactment, questioning perceptions of such devices, while also reclaiming them in order to redefine their intent and potential. Not all works critique these characteristics, but each examines the consumption of knowledge and truth, using the body as form and performance as a site, to address where meaning may reside.

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The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes


Nancy Holt is one of the leading artists of her generation and a pioneer in conceptual, site-specific art and film and video work. She is one of a group of important international artists who initiated the Land art movement in the late 1960s. The Contemporary Art Gallery brings together a selection of photographs from 1967 onwards, many seen for the first time, alongside pivotal film works.

Holt deals with themes centering on memory, perception, time and space. She uses the natural environment as both medium and subject with a focus on the cyclical time of the universe, the daily axial rotation of our planet Earth and its annual orbit around the sun. Photography has always played a central role within her work, both as a way of engaging with the landscape and as a way of documenting site-specific projects.

This exhibition includes major photographic pieces, including early work such as Concrete Visions (1967), an important project made on Dartmoor while visiting the UK with the artist Robert Smithson over forty years ago, Trail Markers (1969); a series of photographs entitled Light and Shadow Photo-Drawings (1978); and photographs by Holt of her most famous work, Sun Tunnels, 1973 – 76 among others. Vancouver itself could not be a more appropriate location for this exhibition, the city renowned for its setting within magnificent natural surroundings, the ongoing photographic legacies in picturing within international visual arts practice, and also being the site for the seminal Glue Pour (1970) by Robert Smithson, Holt’s late husband.

 

 

 

 

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Nancy Holt - Selected Photo and Film Works


The screenings of work by Smith and Robakowski brought together two filmmakers who interrogate the language and mechanics of film itself. They share an interest in the world unfolding around them and in front of the camera, examining occasions and incidents with a humour which undercuts the rigorous nature of their work. Both reveal the narrative potential within the everyday while simultaneously making us aware of the actual and constructed nature of the images we are viewing.

British filmmaker Smith’s work is associated with ‘structural film’, an experimental and analytical approach focused on the illusionary nature of the media itself, specifically looking at its ‘material’ qualities such as the projected light, the film strip and the projection apparatus. The series of films shown here from the 1970œs and 1980œs including his iconic The Girl Chewing Gum (œ1975), demonstrate how Smith expands on the concerns of structuralist practice through new means, including the use of narrative structure, the relationship between sound and image, humour and a close engagement with popular culture.

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John Smith - Shorts


The screenings of work by Smith and Robakowski brought together two filmmakers who interrogate the language and mechanics of film itself. They share an interest in the world unfolding around them and in front of the camera, examining occasions and incidents with a humour which undercuts the rigorous nature of their work. Both reveal the narrative potential within the everyday while simultaneously making us aware of the actual and constructed nature of the images we are viewing.

Józef Robakowski is a pioneer of independent Polish film. From the early 1970œs he interrogated the language, material and mechanics of film, combined with a long-standing interest in conceptualist avant-garde traditions filtered through an insistence on authenticity and personal identity. Presented were a series of pieces produced between 1970 and 2009œ including From My Window, 1978 ˆŠŸ‰– 1999ˆŠŠŠ (2000) shot from Robakowski’s apartment. By filming the world around him and narrating everyday events in his own, often wryly humorous voice, he deployed a kind of personal resistance to the political situation imposed upon him.

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Józef Robakowski - My Own Cinema


The Contemporary Art Gallery worked with Vancouver artist Gareth Moore to co-commission a project comprising seven new films, screened offsite and a series of related posters in the window spaces at the gallery.

For Children’s Films Moore approached a number of international artists to produce short films for children, each person free to focus on any particular topic, shaping the content and form of their respective piece. Artists invited consist of some from Europe as well as other Vancouver based practitioners familiar to our local audiences. Moore then collated the two to five minute pieces into one longer work, providing it with open and closing credits, each section acting as a discrete but interconnected episode.

Akin to the early days of cinema with travelling magic lantern shows, weekly screenings of the 16mm films took place in different locations throughout the city of Vancouver such as community centres, schools and a tent in Emery Barnes Park in downtown Vancouver.

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Children's Films


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the Canadian premiere of two new films, by British artist Andrew Cross.

The Solo features Carl Palmer, legendary rock drummer of the 1970s supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, performing a series of specially composed drum solos in a work that explores the relationship between drummer and drum kit. The film examines different aspects of percussion, with the solo snare drum giving way to brushes, cymbals, hands, felt beaters, and finally a full drum kit solo. Through a process of rigorous editing, sequences of tightly framed images are constructed; Cross’ minimalist style giving rise to a consideration of the shifting nature of cultural value.

Ensemble is Cross’s latest collaboration with 1970s progressive rock musicians, focusing on a group once dubbed Europe’s biggest cult band: The Enid. Throughout their 36 year checkered history, The Enid have both captivated and confounded audiences, always defying clear categorization. In this characteristically restrained film—contradicting the conventions of the “rock-umentary” with the unlikeliest of rock stars—Cross presents an intimate portrait of enigmatic founder Robert John Godfrey together with current band members at their studio and collective home in Northampton, England, and their recent concert with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

In partnership with PuSh Festival and SFU Woodward’s.

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Andrew Cross - The Solo & Ensemble


Screening event presented by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson
Presented by CAG in partnership with Cineworks.

Friday, February 12, 7pm
Cineworks Annex, 235 Alexander Street, Vancouver

Works screened include: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

‘Missives’, is a new free broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities.

The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

Alongside this, the screening event at Cineworks Annex (February 12 from 7pm), invokes a provisional social space, cinema and theatrical set where a temporary community may gather, through which a selection of film and video works explore first person narratives, interview, account and witness in queer Canadian moving image production, and reflect upon our viewing of it in a contemporary context. Presenting older works framed through their practice the evening engages an intergenerational conversation and includes: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

The MISSIVES broadsheet and screening event are generously supported by the British Council.

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Screening | Missives


Weekend events at CAG as part of ‘For a New Accessibility’ Nov 20 to 22, 2015

When I Walk
Film Screening & Tele-talk with Director: Jason DaSilva
Saturday, November 21: 7-9pm
Free admission

In 2006, 25-year-old Jason DaSilva was on vacation at the beach with family when, suddenly, he fell down. He couldn’t get back up. His legs had stopped working; his disease could no longer be ignored.  Just a few months earlier doctors had told him that he had multiple sclerosis, which could lead to loss of vision and muscle control, as well as a myriad of other complications. Jason tried exercise to help cope, but the problem only worsened. After his dispiriting fall on the beach, he turned to his Mom, who reminded him that, despite his disease, he was still a fortunate kid who had the opportunity to pursue the things he loved most: art and filmmaking. Jason picked up the camera, turned it on his declining body, and set out on a worldwide journey in search of healing, self-discovery, and love.

An emotional documentary filled with unexpected moments of humor and joy, WHEN I WALK is a life-affirming film driven by a young man’s determination to survive—and to make sense of a devastating disease through the art of cinema.

Read more about the film:

http://wheniwalk.com/about/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1395808/

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Film Screening & Tele-talk with Director: Jason DaSilva - When I Walk


Screenings and reception at Western Front, 303 E 8th Avenue, Vancouver

Reception: Thursday, June 26, 7-9pm.
Screenings: Friday, June 27 – Sunday, June 29, 12 -5pm.

The Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG), Western Front and Dim Cinema present a weekend-long screening in the Grand Luxe Hall of 2014 Turner Prize nominee, Duncan Campbell’s film Bernadette, as part of the CAG exhibition The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes. Bernadette presents an open and indirect account of Irish dissident and political activist Bernadette Devlin, constructed out of archival footage from the 1960s and early 1970s. Campbell approaches documentary as form of fiction, revealing the complex relationship between author, subject and audience.

Duncan Campbell, born 1972 in Dublin, lives and works in Glasgow. His solo exhibitions include: Duncan Campbell, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2012);  Arbeit, Hotel, London (2011); Duncan Campbell, Belfast Exposed, Belfast (2011); Make It New John, Artist Space, New York and Tramway, Glasgow (2010); Duncan Campbell, Kunstverein Munich, Munich (2009); Bernadette, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2009); Bernadette and Sigmar, MUMOK, Vienna (2009); Art Now Lightbox: Duncan Campbell, Tate Britain, London (2009); 0-60, ICA, London (2008); Art Statements, Art Basel 38, Basel (2008); The Unnameable, Lux at Lounge, London (2006); Something in Nothing, TART Contemporary, San Francisco (2005); Falls Burns Malone Fiddles, Luis Campaña, Cologne (2004). His group exhibitions include: The Big Society, Galerie Vallois, Paris (2011); British Art Show 7,  Nottingham and Hayward Gallery, London  (2010); Critical Fetishes, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2010); Asking Not Telling, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2009);  Fight the Power, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2009); After October, Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York (2008); Art Now, Tate Britain, London (2006); The Need to Document, Halle für Kunst, Lueneburg (2005); Manifesta 5, European Biennial of Contemporary Art, San Sebastian (2004); Advertence, festival of documentary film , Belfast and Dublin (2003); Fresh and Upcoming, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt (2003); Shadazz, Royal College of Art, London (2002). He had been nominated for the 2014 Turner Prize.

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Bernadette - Duncan Campbell


Interludes: Aurélien Froment
Monday, January 20 , 7.30 pm
Tickets $9 – $11– (plus $3 Cinematheque membership)
The Cinematheque, 1131 Howe Street

DIM Cinema, an ongoing series at The Cinematheque, presents videos by the French artist Aurélien Froment, to complement his first Canadian solo exhibition, at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Often using the format of instructional videos, Froment examines the semantic power of images and their elusive relationship to words. Viewers will emerge from the screening having learned more about the production of paper, the life cycle of the medusa, the ergonomics of sitting, the invention of kindergarten, the tying of knots and the palace of memory, than they ever thought possible in the space of 90 minutes. Each one of these analytical, self-reflexive studies works in its own way as a witty or poetic reminder that interpretation is subjective, meaning is never fixed and what one sees is not what others see.

Presented in association with The Cinematheque and PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

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Screening - Interludes: Aurélien Froment


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm

Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri. Her video work Avalon (2011) is included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

In her moving image works, Jafri blurs the distinction between scripted films and unscripted documentaries. In Avalon (2011), Jafri seamlessly weaves together stories from real life workers in an unnamed leather company in an unspecified Asian country, with a script that she wrote herself. The workers in this factory are not told that they are making fetish products to be sold to the masses in the United States, and this selective disclosure can be seen in the disconnect between the production process and the final product itself. Parallels can be made between the secretive nature within the leather factory, the viewer’s unsurety of who is an actor and who is not, as well as to the overall editing process which yields a carefully restrained video work about the complex topics of overseas factories and the world of fetish paraphernalia.

Jafri’s solo exhibitions include: Mouthfeel, Gasworks, London (2014); Backdrop, Bielefelder kustverein, Bielefeld, Germany (2013); Stages, WYSPA Institute of Art, Gdansk (2012); Geographies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde (2012); Headlines and Small Print (with Anderas Fogarasi), Galerie Nova/WHW Zagreb (2012); Global Slum, Beirut, Cairo (2012) and Shanghai Biennial and Taipei Biennial (2012). She has also exhibited in group exhibitions including: Fassbinder Jetzt – Fassbinder and Contemporary Art, Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt (2013); Past is Present (Murals), Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Ten Thousand Wiles, Hundred Thousand Tricks, MuKHA, Antwerp (2013); When Attitudes Became Forms Become Attitudes, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Manifesta 9, Genk (2012). Maryam Jafri lives and works in New York and Copenhagen. She holds a BA in Literature from Brown University, an MA from NYU/Tisch School of The Arts and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

www.maryamjafri.net/avalon.htm

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Artist Talk | Maryam Jafri


The CAG is excited to welcome back Burrard Marina Field House Studio resident Keg de Souza this evening with a screening of her film, If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood… The film, which De Souza created during her artist residency with Kunci Cultural Studies Centre in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, explores the gentrification of a neighbourhood located alongside Yogyakarta’s main river, Kali Code. In the 1970s, the Kampung Ratmakan (neighbourhood) was built by squatters on a graveyard – a characteristic that continues to affect the community living there today. Ghosts are often seen by local residents and the community relies on a local ghost expert to move the ghosts out of their houses. In 2013 the mayor announced plans to develop the area and now the residents, like the ghosts, are beginning to be displaced. In addition to the film, De Souza worked alongside the residents of Kampung Ratmakan to create an inflatable ghost house (pictured above). The interior of the ghost house features embroidered ghost stories created from drawings made by some of the local children during a ghost story workshop.

We hope to see you there!

Screening:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Wednesday, March 18th, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House

Film credits:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Keg de Souza
2014
Duration: 31:45
Single channel HD video, sound, mirrors
Indonesian and Javanese with English subtitles

Interviewees: Pak Kuncung, Ikbal, Pak Antok, Mas Anton, Pak Remi, Budeh Kom, Mbah Endang, Ibu Toko, Ersa, Pak Agus, Sania, Mak Yem.
Translator/ community liaison: Invani Lela Herliana
Sound recordist: Lucas Abela
Original music: Pawang Hantu by Senyawa
Post sound: Timothy Dwyer
Subtitling: Invani Lela Herliana, Rully Shabara

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Keg de Souza – If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…


$30.00

Published: 12/2015
130 pages

Texts by Isla Leaver-Yap and Catherine Lord. Conversation between Patrick Staff and Tom of Finland Foundation’s S.R. Sharp
This book documents the eponymous work by British artist, Patrick Staff, presented at the Chisenhale Gallery, London; Spike Island, Bristol; Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; and the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane. The film combines footage shot at the Tom of Finland Foundation in Los Angeles—home to the archive of the erotic artist and gay icon and a community of people that care for it—with choreographic sequences shot within a specially constructed set.

The legacy of Finnish artist Touko Laaksonen (1920-1991), better known as Tom of Finland, spans multiple generations. Tom of Finland’s work made a considerable impact on masculine representation and imagery in post-war gay culture. Rather than focusing on Tom of Finland’s work, Staff’s film evokes the foundation as a set of relations. Staff explores how a collection is formed and constituted; the communities that produce and are produced by a body of work; and ideas of intergenerational relationships and care. Through observational footage of the house, its collections and inhabitants, the foundation is revealed as a domestic environment, a libidinal space, archive, office and community centre; a private space which is also the home of a public-facing organisation and the source of a widely dispersed body of images.

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The Foundation - Patrick Staff


$40.00

Published:
160 pages

UK based artist Kelly Richardson has won international acclaim for her large scale, multi-channel video installations. This superbly illustrated retrospective of audiovisual installations works is the first retrospective publication featuring an extensive look at the UK-based Canadian born artist's audiovisual installation works of the last fifteen years. The Last Frontier is a comprehensive survey of Richardson’s artistic output, features four beautiful cover options to choose from, and includes essays by Alistair Robinson, Holly E. Hughes and Kelly Gordon and an introduction by Ryan Doherty and Louis Grachos. Designed by Three Legged Dog Design.

This publication is available in a choice of three covers, Orion Tide, Leviathan and Mariner.

*Special exhibition price of $40, only during the exhibition.

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Kelly Richardson - The Last Frontier


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