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Feedback Series

Feedback Series: Close Readings — Julia Dault

Tuesday, May 12, 7pm

Mark DeLong, Richard MacFarlane and Brynn McNab

An invited group of local cultural producers offer responses in the form of readings, images or video, providing diverse and layered conversations on Dault’s work.

Feedback Talk:
This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series: Close Readings — Julia Dault with Mark DeLong, Richard MacFarlane and Brynn McNab


Feedback Talk: Close Readings Jeremy Shaw’s Variation FQ
Tuesday, March 24, 7pm

Join us for a close reading of one work in our current exhibition Jeremy Shaw’s Medium-Based Time. The CAG has invited a group of local artists to give short responses to Shaw’s Variation FQ to open up a diverse and layered conversation regarding the work. Each speaker will offer a response in the form of a reading, image or video (their own or found) engaging the various thematics Variation FQ encounters.

Respondents include:

Aja Bond
Hannah Jickling
Helen Reed
Justine Chambers
Stacy Ho

Background information about Variation FQ

For Variation FQ (2011-13), Shaw worked with legendary voguer Leiomy Maldonado to produce a film that explores aspects of subculture, dance, gender, power and special effects. “Vogue” is a primarily black and latino, gay subculture that evolved out of the drag balls of New York in the 1980s and includes a fluid, yet raw dance style based around miming the poses of models from high fashion magazines.

The film sets Leiomy starkly lit against a black void performing her signature freestyle dance teetering between elegance and violence. As the film progresses, Shaw introduces step-and-repeat style visual effects, originally created by Canadian animator Norman McLaren in his 1968 ballet film Pas de deux. In Pas de deux, this optical printing technique embellishes the seduction between a male and female ballerina as typically choreographed for the stage. In Variation FQ, the use of special effects creates a ghostly layering and repetition of Leiomy’s image in her most virtuosic gestures and extends the experience of abandon evident in the consequences on her human body. Leiomy’s performance is accompanied by Shaw’s original soundtrack that combines a minimalist piano score with contemporary chopped and pitched audio techniques. This merging of classical composition with manipulated pop a cappella MP3’s is emblematic of Shaw’s fascination of the interdependence between high and low taste cultures.

Presenter Bios:

Aja Rose Bond is an intermedia artist with background in music, craft and fashion respectively, drawing from the deep influence of D.I.Y. punk, feminisms and magick. She explores the interplay of the public and the private through collaborations, collective organizing, solo-projects and a variety of mediums including sound, performance, installation, textile sculpture, drawing, collage and social practice. Her intimate relationship with certain mystical traditions has informed her process which often includes the use of divination, symbols and geometry to align and reveal the more hidden elemental and energetic aspects of the work. While at once being a political statement and an economic necessity, the use of found and reclaimed materials is instrumental to her understanding of the subtle life within objects. By attempting to balance service and self-care within her practice as a whole, and by ritualizing both process and presentation, she creates spaces wherein their boundaries may overlap or dissolve altogether. It is an intentionally intuitive approach wherein conceptual analysis reveals itself lastly, if at all. She is self-taught with the exception of some formal training in fashion arts and contemporary music. Her other projects and collaborations include; HYPERCRAFT Studio, The STAG (Strathcona Art Gallery) Library, Craft Pride Procession, Her Jazz Noise Collective, UNARC (Underground Network of Artist-Run Culture), WOEVAN (Witches of East Van), Seamrippers Craft Collective, Diadem (w/partner Gabriel Saloman), In Flux (w/members of Shearing Pinx), DJ Tapes and the Women’s Studies performance series co-produced w/VIVO Media Arts Center. She lives on unceded Coast Salish Territory, in Vancouver BC.

Hannah Jickling experiments with the possibilities of form, participation and meaning-making across disciplines and publics. Her projects institute sport, outdoor recreation and education as models for performance, participation and feminist engagement. Works often take shape as site-specific sculptures, public installations, events and exchanges, while documents of these gestures become photographs, multiples, printed matter and other ephemera. Atypical forms of distribution, entrepreneurial scheming and audience-seeking are important strategies for supporting and disseminating her work. Originally from Whitehorse and currently based in Vancouver, Hannah has lived and worked in Halifax, Glasgow, Toronto, Dawson City and Portland. In recent years, she has shown and/or presented at the YYZ Artists Outlet, the Power Plant (Toronto), Apexart (New York), the Carleton University Art Gallery (Ottawa), the Portland Art Museum, Recess Gallery (Portland), the SFMoMA (San Francisco), the Vancouver Art Gallery, Access Gallery, the Or Gallery (Vancouver), the Dalhousie University Art Gallery, the Eyelevel Gallery (Halifax), and the Yukon Arts Centre Gallery (Whitehorse). Her work is held in private collections across North America and can be tasted in the form of sourdough pancakes, a permanent public work at Bubby’s, a restaurant in Manhattan. She holds a BFA from the NSCAD University and an MFA from Portland State University. Hannah Frequently collaborates with Helen Reed.

Helen Reed has made work with Twin Peaks fans, lesbian separatists, high school art teacher candidates and grade six students. In each project, collaboration is a working process from which the artwork emerges. Reed favors collaborators that reflect her interest in participatory culture, affinity groups, and fantasy-based subcultures. Her projects take vernacular form as television shows, publications, postcards and other forms of easily transmittable and dispersed media. Reed has exhibited work at Prefix Institute for Contemporary Art (Toronto), The Dunlop Art Gallery (Regina), The Foreman Art Gallery (Sherbrooke), apexart (New York), Smack Mellon (New York), Portland Art Museum, Seattle Art Museum and La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse (Montréal). She holds a BFA from the Emily Carr University of Art and Design (Vancouver), an MFA in Art and Social Practice from Portland State University. She frequently collaborates with Hannah Jickling.

Justine Chambers’ interests lie in collaborative creation and re-imagining dance performance. She is drawn to the movement of all bodies, and is focused on the dances that are already there: the social choreographies present in the everyday. Her recent choreographic projects include: Family Dinner, Enters and Exits, COPY, On Any Given Day, and Caesura. Chambers’ work has been presented by: Dances for a Small Stage, Dance Saskatchewan, Dancing on the Edge Festival, New Dance Horizons, The Roundhouse Community Arts Centre, Vancouver Art Gallery: FUSE and the Western Front. Chambers is a founding member of projet bk. Justine is currently on of five artists in residence at ten fifteen maple

Stacey Ho has worked with organizations such as FADO Performance Art, Gallery 44, Vidéographe, and WWTWO. Her writing has been published in Modern Painters, West Coast Line, and Inter: art actuel. She lives in Vancouver, where she is presently associate director of LIVE Biennale.

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Feedback Talk: Close Readings Jeremy Shaw's - Variation FQ


Zora McMillan
Sunday, February 1, 2pm

Zora McMillan is an assistant curator at the Nisga’a Museum. She will discuss her ongoing project of connecting repatriated Nisga’a objects with the community’s oral histories.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback talk | Zora McMillan


Carmen Papalia
Tuesday, December 2, 7pm

Vancouver based artist Carmen Papalia will host a talk/workshop exploring non-visual methods of knowing and interpretation. He designs experiences that invite participants to expand their perceptual mobility and each walking tour, workshop, collaborative performance, public intervention, museum project and art object, forms a gesture that contributes to a productive understanding of accessibility. Papalia’s work has been featured in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Columbus Museum of Art, Portland Art Museum, Vancouver Art Gallery, Gallery Gachet and the Purple Thistle Center, Vancouver. In early 2015 Papalia will embark on a three month residency at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London as the recipient of the 2014 Adam Reynolds Memorial Bursary.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Carmen Papalia


Feedback talk – Alec Bălășescu

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Feedback Talk | Alec Balasescu


Shama Khanna
Tuesday, April 8, 7pm

London-based curator Shama Khanna’s current research project Flatness engages screen based images and immaterial culture in relation to the internet. Launched at the Oberhausen Short Film Festival Flatness currently operates across multiple platforms including www.flatness.eu featuring contributions by artists, writers and technologists who engage with the web as a creative site and a space for viewing. Khanna is undertaking a residency at Western Front (March 17 – April 14, 2014) and will respond to the work of Kevin Schmidt.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Shama Khanna


Michael Turner
Tuesday, May 6, 7pm

Michael Turner is a Vancouver-based writer of fiction, criticism and song. His published multi-genre literary titles include Hard Core Logo, The Pornographer’s Poem and 8 × 10. He has also
written essays on the work of artists Julia Feyrer, Brian Jungen, Ken Lum, Christina Mackie and Michael Morris, whose 2012 exhibition Letters: Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry was co-curated by Turner and Scott Watson at the Morris and Helen Belkin Gallery, UBC. A frequent collaborator, he has written scripts with Stan Douglas, poems with Geoffrey Farmer and songs with Andrea Young. His writing can be found online at Canadian Art and on his blog at www.mtwebsit.blogspot.ca. Turner will respond to Kevin Schmidt’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Michael Turner


Margaret Dragu
Tuesday, March 11, 7pm

Margaret Dragu is a key figure in Vancouver’s art community, with a practice encompassing video, installation, web-based projects, publications and performance. Dragu is integral to the development of performance art in Canada and was the first subject of FADO’s Performance Art Legends series in 2000. In 2012 she was awarded the Governor General award for Visual Art & Media. Her performances are relational, durational, interventionist and community-based often enacting various personae to explore history, memory and performance in the everyday. Most recently Richmond Art Gallery presented Dragu’s first Gallery-based solo exhibition, VERB WOMAN: the wall is in my head/a dance of forgetting. Dragu will respond to the performance work of Tim Etchells.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Margaret Dragu


Marie-Hélène Tessier
Tuesday, March 4, 7pm

This feedback talk will be presented in French.

Marie-Hélène Tessier is a visual artist and writer based in Vancouver. Her work is site-specific and migrates freely between fiction, philosophy, fashion and art. Preoccupied with the infinite slicing of reality and the construction of meaning, her research seeks to collapse hierarchies of knowing. She has a degree in French Literature from University of Montreal, a visual arts diploma from Emerson College, a philosophy diploma from Sunbridge College, Columbia University and she graduated in visual arts from Emily Carr University of Art + Design in 2001. Tessier will respond to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Marie-Hélène Tessier- Froment Fromented


Adele Diamond
Tuesday, February 18, 7pm

Adele Diamond, Ph.D., is the Canada Research Chair Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. Her work integrates developmental, cognitive, neuroscience and molecular genetic approaches to examine fundamental questions about the development of the cognitive control abilities that rely on a region of the brain known as ‘prefrontal cortex’. Her recent work, including a paper in the journal Science is affecting early education practices around the world. Diamond will respond to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Adele Diamond


William Wood is an art historian and critic concentrating on the history of conceptual art and contemporary Canadian and international work in photography, moving pictures and installation. Starting as a critic and editor with C Magazine, Vanguard, Parachute and Public, Wood went on to a doctorate at the University of Sussex and has taught at universities in the United Kingdom, Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario. Recent publications include essays for Ian Wallace: At the Intersection of Painting and Photography and Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965–1980. Forthcoming are writings on The Piano, an exhibition held at the Art Gallery of Alberta this past summer, and Michael Morris: Letters for the Helen and Morris Belkin Art Gallery. For his Feedback talk Wood will address his remarks to the theme of the para-photographic as it relates to the James Welling exhibition and other artists working with photography.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | William Wood


Kathy Slade works with embroidery, sound, sculpture, books, film and video. Recent exhibitions include: It was a strange apartment full of books …, Galerie Au rue 8 saint bon, Paris; IS EVERYTHING GOING TO BE ALRIGHT?, Audain Gallery, Vancouver; Cue: Artists’ Video, Vancouver Art Gallery; and Die Perfekte Ausstellung, Heidelberger Kunstverein. Additionally Slade collaborates with Brady Cranfield on two ongoing projects The Music Appreciation Society, and a music group that has produced two concept albums 12 Sun Songs (2009, Or Gallery and Christoph Keller Editions, Zürich) and 10 Riot Songs (2011, Presentation House Gallery, North Vancouver). She will be responding to the work of Kay Rosen.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Kathy Slade


Jem Noble’s practice encompasses digital image-making, sound, sculpture, performance and text and is concerned with questions of framing, indeterminacy and co-production. Among recent projects he has given a performance-lecture for the European Arts Research Network at dOCUMENTA (13); created image, text and audio work in conjunction with Bruce Nauman’s Days at the ICA, London; made structural edits of 1988 feature films Ghosts of the Civil Dead and They Live, screened at Arnolfini, Bristol, UK and The Engine Room, Wellington, New Zealand; and painstakingly recorded music from the internet in real-time over three months to DJ at Manifesta 7 in Trentino in collaboration with Swedish anti-copyright activists Piratbyrån. He has also undertaken several commissioned collaborations with Turner Prize 2012 winner, Elizabeth Price, producing sound and music for her large-scale video installations. Noble is founding member of the Blackout Arts expanded-cinema collective (2002–2010) and was co-director of Venn Festival of new and exploratory music and sound between 2004 and 2008.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Jem Noble


Krisztina Laszlo holds a cross-appointment at the University of British Columbia as the archivist for the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery and the Museum of Anthropology. Her research interests include artist’s archives, curatorial and artistic interpretations of the archive, cultural property and preservation of media art. She received a Master of Archival Studies from the University of British Columbia and also holds a Certificate in Public History and a Bachelor of General Studies from Simon Fraser University. Laszlo will discuss a series of slides produced by archeologist and anthropologist Wilson Duff now held in the MOA collection referenced by Mike Nelson in his new commission Eighty Circles through Canada (The Last Possessions of an Orcadian Mountain Man), 2013. Commissioned in partnership with Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff Centre.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Talk | Krisztina Laszlo


This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

In response to the exhibition Itee Pootoogook, Buildings and Land, Crosby will discuss some aspects of her PhD research, which focuses on the formation of Aboriginal cultural production in urban spaces in Vancouver, B.C., for Native and non-Native publics; these include diverse forms of performativity, the display and sale of Aboriginally produced objects, and urban community supports by well-known First Nations artists through their association with new Aboriginal social organizations.

Marcia Crosby is currently completing her PhD in the Department of Art History and Visual Culture, UBC, and also works as an independent scholar. Crosby has a BFA in Fine Arts and English Literature, and an MA in Art History, UBC (1993), her MA thesis focused on the tension between representations of Aboriginal cultures and peoples in the public sphere, the work of Indigenous art and artists, and representations of Aboriginal title in B.C.

In addition to teaching literature and Native Studies at Vancouver Island University for 16 years, she has worked as a researcher, reviewing Aboriginal programs in public institutions. Her current work as a PhD candidate at UBC, builds on the curatorial work completed for the exhibition and accompanying publication, Nations in Urban Landscapes (Contemporary Art Gallery in 1994 and which toured to Oboro, Montréal, 1996), and the more recent exhibition: Aboriginal art in the city: Fine and Popular (2008), which is one of several web projects produced through the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, as part of Ruins in Progress: Vancouver Art in the Sixties. More recently in 2012, she co-curated with Karen Duffek, The Paintings of Henry Speck: Udz’stalis at the Belkin Satellite Gallery, Vancouver.

Next in the Feedback series:

Kathy Slade
Tuesday, July 23, 7pm

Karol Sienkiewicz
Tuesday, August 20, 7pm

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Feedback Talk | Marcia Crosby


Allison Collins is an independent curator, writer and researcher who lives and works in Vancouver, BC. Her recent curatorial projects have included Moveable Facture, VIVO, Vancouver; Suspicious Futures: Select Works of Susan Britton, V tape, Toronto, DIM Cinema, Vancouver and PLATFORM, Winnipeg; Hold Still Wild Youth: The GINA Show Archive, Or Gallery and VIVO, Vancouver. In 2011 she produced ARCLines a series of written profiles tracing the inception of Vancouver’s Artist-run Centre’s which was published on arcpost.ca. Collins currently holds the position of Adult Public Programs Coordinator at the Vancouver Art Gallery and was the Event Manager for Institutions by Artists: The Convention, a three-day international conference held in Vancouver in October 2012. Her writing has been published by C Magazine, Fuse, ArtSlant, Or Gallery, V tape and Publication Studio. Prompted by both Erin Shirreff and Nancy Holt’s exhibitions, Collins will share her research into the material nature of video and film.

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Feedback Talk | Allison Collins


Gabrielle Moser is a writer, educator and curator based in Toronto. She regularly contributes to artforum.com, and her writing has appeared in Art in America, ARTnews, Fillip, Photography & Culture and the Journal of Visual Culture. She has curated exhibitions for Access Gallery, Gallery TPW, Xpace and Vtape. Moser holds a PhD in art history and visual culture from York University and teaches at OCAD University. She responded to the work of Krista Belle Stewart.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Gabriel Moser


Kimberly Phillips responds to the work of Jurgen Partenheimer. Director/Curator at Access Gallery, Phillips holds a doctorate in art history from the University of British Columbia, where she focused on the complexity of German collective memory as negotiated through ephemeral artistic interventions in the public realm of post-1989 Berlin. She is a sessional instructor at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the University of British Columbia, where she teaches courses on the history of visual culture, cultural theory and curatorial practice. During her recent residency at 221A, she collaborated with Vanessa Kwan present a solo exhibition of work by Kara Uzelman accompanied by the publication Unknown Objects, featuring a text by the poet and essayist Lisa Robertson.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Kimberly Phillips


Anthropologist Bălășescu specializes in material culture, the body, consumption and cultural aspects of economy. He is the author of Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills, Aesthetic Bodies, Political Subjects (ZetaBooks, 2007) and taught at the National School of Political and Administrative Studies, Bucharest; American University in Paris; University of California, Irvine; Royal University for Women, Bahrain and Galatasaray University, Istanbul. He worked as deputy director for the Romanian Cultural Institute ‘Dimitrie Cantemir’ in Istanbul and is currently based in Vancouver, interested in urban ecology and social business models.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Alec Balasescu


Marilyn Brakhage is a graduate of the Motion Picture Studies and Art History departments of Ryerson and York Universities, Toronto. She has worked as a film distributor, programmer, freelance writer and home educator, and is currently consulting on and managing the estate of her late husband, filmmaker and theoretician, Stan Brakhage (1933–2003). Marilyn responds to the work of her late husband.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Marilyn Brakhage


Michael Turner is a Vancouver-based writer of fiction, criticism and song. His published multi-genre literary titles include Hard Core Logo, The Pornographer’s Poem and 8 × 10. He has also written essays on the work of artists Julia Feyrer, Brian Jungen, Ken Lum, Christina Mackie and Michael Morris, whose 2012 exhibition Letters: Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry was co-curated by Turner and Scott Watson at the Morris and Helen Belkin Gallery, UBC. A frequent collaborator, he has written scripts with Stan Douglas, poems with Geoffrey Farmer and songs with Andrea Young. His writing can be found online at Canadian Art and on his blog at www.mtwebsit.blogspot.ca. Turner responds to Kevin Schmidt’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

 

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Feedback Series Talk | Michael Turner


Bancroft has been a practicing artist in Vancouver for over thirty years. National and international exhibitions include those at the Vancouver Art Gallery and at the Centre Culturel Canadien in Paris. She is represented in the collections of the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography (the National Gallery) in Ottawa and the Canada Council Art Bank. In addition to photography, her work has included text, sound, drawing, sculpture and more recently, video. Her current interests are the intersections of the photographic image with history, music and mapping strategies in relation to representations of landscape. Bancroft is an Associate Professor at Emily Carr University, where she has been teaching since 1981. She is a member of the board of Artspeak Gallery and is represented in Vancouver by Republic Gallery.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture

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Marian Penner Bancroft


London-based curator Shama Khanna’s current research project Flatness engages screen based images and immaterial culture in relation to the internet. Launched at the Oberhausen Short Film Festival, Flatness currently operates across multiple platforms including www.flatness.eu featuring contributions by artists, writers and technologists who engage with the web as a creative site and a space for viewing. Khanna undertook a residency at Western Front (March 17 – April 14, 2014) and responds to the work of Kevin Schmidt.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

MORE

Feedback Series Talk | Shama Khanna


Adele Diamond, Ph.D., is the Canada Research Chair Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. Her work integrates developmental, cognitive, neuroscience and molecular genetic approaches to examine fundamental questions about the development of the cognitive control abilities that rely on a region of the brain known as ‘prefrontal cortex’. Her recent work, including a paper in the journal Science is affecting early education practices around the world. Diamond responds to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Adele Diamond


As part of our Feedback series acclaimed Toronto-based artist Luis Jacob responded to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition ‘Fröbel Fröbeled’, he also discussed his own practice and his interest in pedagogical ideas contained in the exhibition.

Luis Jacob is an artist based in Toronto, whose diverse practice addresses social interaction and the subjectivity of aesthetic experience.  Realized as painting, video, installation, photography and actions in the public sphere, Jacob’s work invites a collision of meaning systems that destabilize our conventions of viewing and that open up possibilities for engagement and the creation of knowledge.

As an artist, he has achieved an international reputation – particularly since his participation in documenta12, curated by Ruth Noack and Roger Bürgel in 2007.  Several significant solo exhibitions include Kunstverein Hamburg (curated by Meike Behm and Yilmaz Dziewior in 2008) ; Städtisches Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (curated by Suzanne Titz in 2009); Fonderie Darling, Montréal (curated by Marie Fraser in 2010); Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto (curated by David Liss in 2011); and Kunsthalle Lingen (curated by Meike Behm in 2012). Jacob’s work was also featured in group exhibitions at the Taipei Biennial (2012); Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2012); Witte de With Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2012); Generali Foundation, Vienna (2011); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2010); Contemporary Art Museum, Houston (2010); Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Philadelphia (2009); Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst (MuHKA), Antwerp (2008); Barbican Art Gallery, London (2008); and The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto (2008). His work is found in the permanent collection of the Generali Foundation (Vienna, Austria); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa, Canada); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, USA); Städtisches Museum Abteiberg (Mönchengladbach, Germany); Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Canada); Museion‚ Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (Bolzano, Italy); Agnes Etherington Art Centre (Kingston, Canada); Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto, Canada); and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, University of Toronto (Toronto, Canada).

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Luis Jacob


William Wood is an art historian and critic concentrating on the history of conceptual art and contemporary Canadian and international work in photography, moving pictures and installation. Starting as a critic and editor with C Magazine, Vanguard, Parachute and Public, Wood went on to a doctorate at the University of Sussex and has taught at universities in the United Kingdom, Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario. Recent publications include essays for Ian Wallace: At the Intersection of Painting and Photography and Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965–1980. Forthcoming are writings on The Piano, an exhibition held at the Art Gallery of Alberta this past summer, and Michael Morris: Letters for the Helen and Morris Belkin Art Gallery. For his Feedback talk Wood addressed his remarks to the theme of the para-photographic as it related to the James Welling exhibition and other artists working with photography.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

MORE

William Wood


Jem Noble’s practice encompasses digital image-making, sound, sculpture, performance and text and is concerned with questions of framing, indeterminacy and co-production. Among recent projects he has given a performance-lecture for the European Arts Research Network at dOCUMENTA (13); created image, text and audio work in conjunction with Bruce Nauman’s Days at the ICA, London; made structural edits of 1988 feature films Ghosts of the Civil Dead and They Live, screened at Arnolfini, Bristol, UK and The Engine Room, Wellington, New Zealand; and painstakingly recorded music from the internet in real-time over three months to DJ at Manifesta 7 in Trentino in collaboration with Swedish anti copyright activists Piratbyrån. He has also undertaken several commissioned collaborations with Turner Prize 2012 winner, Elizabeth Price, producing sound and music for her large-scale video installations. Noble is founding member of the Blackout Arts expanded-cinema collective (2002–2010) and was co-director of Venn Festival of new and exploratory music and sound between 2004 and 2008. Noble responded to the work of Mike Nelson.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Jem Noble


Randy Lee Cutler is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Visual Art + Material Practice at Emily Carr University. As a writer, artist and educator she is invested in the emergence of new cultural forms and expression. In addition to working on an ebook on the metaphor of digestion, Randy is exploring the geological and virtual potential of crystal formations. Drawn from Gilles Deleuze’s writing on cinema, crystal circuits suggest a spectacular form for both the making and experiencing of an art object. The crystal — though empty and transparent — is a flashpoint for symbolic intensities. Launching from Erin Shirreff’s exhibition, Cutler will share her research into crystals.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Randy Lee Cutler: Crystal Circuits


Karol Sienkiewicz is a Polish art critic and art historian, currently based in Vancouver. He has contributed essays and reviews to numerous publications, including dwutygodnik, Spike, Camera
Austria, Art Agenda and more recently Decoy and Canadian Art. Together with Kasia Redzisz, he has just published Świadomość (Neue Bieriemiennost), the group involving artists such as Miroslaw Balka active in Warsaw during the 1980s. He is currently working on a new publication focusing on the ‘critical artists’ in Warsaw in 1990s, placing their work in the context of recent Polish transformation. Sienkiewicz’s talk considered Warsaw’s 10th-Anniversary Stadium as seen through the lens of contemporary art, the site serving as a transient symbol of historic changes, economic transformation and social relations and a specific reference for Sosnowska’s sculptures exhibited at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

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Karol Sienkiewicz


Colin Browne’s most recent book of poems, ‘The Properties’ was the prompt for this special Feedback talk. Readings and discussion points from Colin Browne led an inquiry into the idea of ‘documentary’ in relationship to the works on display. Colin Browne is a filmmaker, writer, film historian, a professor of film in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University, and a poet who has been nominated for the Governor-General’s Award for Poetry.

The Feedback series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Colin Browne: Readings and Talk


Dominic McIver Lopes is a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at UBC, President of the American Society for Aesthetics, a member of the British Society of Aesthetics, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. He is also co-editor (with Berys Gaut) of Wiley- Blackwell’s New Directions in Aesthetics. His work focuses on pictorial representation and perception; the aesthetic and epistemic value of pictures, and the ontology of art. He is working on two books entitled Beyond Art and Four Arts of Photography. Tonight he explores taste and suggests new ways of thinking about contemporary art practices.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Dominic McIver Lopes: Acquired Taste - What's the point?


Iglika Ivanova is an Economist and Public Interest Researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. In her talk both her personal and professional world play a part as she encounters Ciprian Muresan’s work. Born and raised in Bulgaria she understands the shifting global politics in the global world as well as a need for radical change in the local communities. Ivanova holds an MA in Economics from the University of British Columbia and a BA in Economics from Simon Fraser University.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Iglika Ivanova: From East to West


Artist Liz Magor explored her current interests focusing on her experience with re-enactors, who perform a cycle of repetition in their quest to be affiliated with a larger group. Magor is an Associate Professor in Visual Arts at Emily Carr University, her sculptural work involves ordinary or familiar objects often refashioned. She has shown internationally at Documenta and at the Venice Biennale.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Liz Magor: Desire of the Individual


Am Johal is a community developer who works at SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement having previously worked on the Vancouver Agreement in urban economic and social development, as a political advisor, in human rights and as a freelance journalist with Inter Press Service. He was the cofounder of UBC’s Humanities 101 program and was Chair of the Impact on Communities Coalition. He is on the Steering Committee of SFU’s Centre for Dialogue, is a member of the Vancouver City Planning Commission and a board member with the Vancity Community Foundation. He is a part-time doctoral student in Media Philosophy at European Graduate School in Switzerland. In his talk he considers how his work is affected by the critical engagement of the art work on display at the CAG.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Am Johal: The Politics of Community


Bill Pechet is a Lecturer in Practice in the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at UBC, with a special concern for the emerging manners of contemporary urban social practice. He also works independently an array of projects from strategic urban planning studies through to residential and retail design, cemeteries, set design, and art-in-public-places installations. Along with Stephanie Robb, Bill represented Canada in the 2006 Venice Biennale of Architecture with a witty critique of leisure culture called SweaterLodge.

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Bill Pechet: The Manners of Social Practises


Prompted by the exhibition of work by Nathan Coley, artist Jin-me Yoon examined questions concerning identity, place and subjectivity in an accelerated globalized era in relation to her practice. These include the consequences for reconsidering power and ideas of progress, and the means for slowing down signification and extending temporality. What are the aesthetic, social and political implications of absence and the void as a paradoxical space ‘full’ with presence and necessary doubt?

Jin-me Yoon is a Professor of Visual Studies at Simon Fraser University and represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Jin-me Yoon: The Void and Temporality


Amber Frid-Jimenez is an artist and recently appointed Associate Professor at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Her talk explored the latent intersections between design, technology and contemporary art. Trained in design and media arts at the MIT Media Lab, her current and recent research and teaching affiliations include the Jan van Eyck Academie in the Netherlands, the MIT Program for Art, Culture and Technology, and the National Academy of Art & Design in Bergen, Norway.

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Amber Frid-Jimenez: The Line Between Them


Chris Lee, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at UBC is interested in the trans-specific circulation of artistic practices and cultures. Prompted by Xu Zhen’s work and in particular his role as a contemporary Chinese artist, Chris Lee drew from his own theoretical concerns to consider the role of Chinese migrations and identities in comparative, transnational and artistic frameworks.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Chris Lee


Prompted by Josephine Meckseper’s work, artist and writer Gareth James speaks to the theoretical and experimental methodologies that underpin his own practice to investigate the artistic considerations which emerge when one artist considers the work of another.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Gareth James: The One and the Many


Anthropologist, curator and UBC Professor Nicky Levell’s interests are located in the interdisciplinary folds of anthropology, theoretical museology, material culture and critical curatorial studies. She responded to Matthew Monahan’s work.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Nicky Levell: Art Through Anthropology


Renowned art historian and writer, former chair at UC Santa Cruz and the University of California, Catherine Soussloff is the former Head of the department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at UBC, ignited a conversation drawing from the disciplines of historiography, theory and philosophy.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Catherine Soussloff: Death, Benjamin and Melancholy


Artist Peter Gazendam drew from his own practice as he toured the Matthew Monahan exhibition, and talked about the many practices of sculpture and its contemporary relationship within history and art.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Peter Gazendam


The CAG has invited artist, deejay and movement based therapist Tad Hozumi to create a series of feedback events and workshops in response to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition Blame It On the Rain.

His upcoming series of music and movement workshops and events will playfully reference elements found in her work.

Here Hozumi writes, the first in a series of blog reports, about his work and about preparing for the events and workshops:

Last weekend I installed a listening station for a selection of funk and disco vinyl records in the CAG bookshop (see above image). This listening station is part of my feedback response to the current exhibition: Julia Dault’s Blame It On the Rain. My initial task was to curate a selection of records that responded to Dault’s works and that served as the inspiration for a series of workshops. The curatorial method I undertook was really simple: Rhythms x Patterns x Geometry x Materials. Dault’s eye is similar to that of a crate-digger, she is constantly scanning the visible ‘debris’ in our environment for moments of resonance.

Crate-digging, if I can give the most romantic definition, is the practice of scouring through dusty bins of long forgotten music to unearth rare or special records. There are a lot of great crate-diggers out there, including Japan’s DJ Muro or Vancouver’s own Sipreano, who recently released Native North America Vol. 1 – Aboriginal Folk, Rock, And Country 1966–1985, a project that I am sure will go down as something of historical importance in our time.

Not all crate-diggers have an active public life, deejay or compile music. If I had to guess most are actually very private, sharing their collections with a few people who are willing to bear them in order to get a sneak peak at an unknown gem. There is one thing I am pretty sure of, digging while mysterious, certainly is not glamorous.

As a crate-digger, I’m just a baby. It’s exciting, because almost everything I come across is new to me. Perusing bins at a thrift shop will almost always turn up some new discoveries. I used to think I had a pretty good handle on music. I was wrong. I think the current statistic is that over 80% of recorded music on vinyl is unavailable digitally. So crate-digging can expand the musical world you live in quite a bit.

The record in the above picture (click on the arrow for the slideshow) is Outline – Gino Soccio. A really top notch Montreal disco record. It was actually one of  first five records I randomly bought in a thrift store. Man, I was happy when I first heard the slick beat on Dancer. Somehow I felt like this omniscient being who could magically discover dope records. Being able to visually locate the sensibility of an album without any audio information is a big part of crate-digging.

After I bought Soccio’s album, when I was about 1,000 records deep in to my collection, I realized that the album was pretty common. A great album for sure, but not necessarily a spectacular or rare find that I thought I had made. I now have three copies of Outline and a 7” of Dancer. Still, I have a lot of emotions attached to Soccio’s first release.

Any ways, you can listen here to Dancer. A real classic. Thumping.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3y2C8jqG8Q

Other albums selected for this project are:

Extensions of a Man
- Donny Hathaway
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9Uydcm0CgQ

Encounters Of Every Kind – Meco
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kvFGFbA6LI

Sweet honey: in the rock (Self-Titled)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pQW95XPmCY

A Fifth of Beethoven – Walter Murphy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y67xr124DC4

Live Oblivion – Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGa8SCTKXsA

I hope you will come by the CAG and enjoy listening to the above records in person

This is my music + vinyl blog.
http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com/

- Tad Hozumi

__________

Join Tad Hozumi at these upcoming feedback events: 

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE!
Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

 

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‘Crate-digging for Julia Dault’ by Tad Hozumi


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