MENU

Blog

Loading
Gallery Hours
Tuesday to Sunday 12 - 6pm
Free Admission
 

Events

Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Brendan Fernandes


The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes is a group exhibition of recent film and video that seeks to interrogate notions of uncertainty within the documentary format. Work by ten artists engages with the conventions of source footage, narrative voice and re-enactment, questioning perceptions of such devices, while also reclaiming them in order to redefine their intent and potential. Not all works critique these characteristics, but each examines the consumption of knowledge and truth, using the body as form and performance as a site, to address where meaning may reside.

MORE

The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Marie Lorenz


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Broken City Lab


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Raymond Boisjoly


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first exhibition of work by Polish artist Monika Sosnowka in Canada. Best known for her ambitious architectural and sculptural installations which simultaneously embrace and resist the spaces they occupy,  Sosnowska’s exhibition obliquely references her hometown of Warsaw and the economic shift that has occurred since the collapse of communism in 1989 to the present day. Characteristically the artist’s sculptures recall familiar objects transformed in some way –  dysfunctional stairways that join one floor to the other but to no purpose or large-scale metal cubes and girder structures twisted and wedged into existing gallery spaces.

At the Contemporary Art Gallery we present a series of new painted steel sculptures, redolent of broken market vendor stands, referencing actual forms salvaged from Jarmark Europa Stadium, originally the site of a large market that sold everything from imitation Nike training shoes to pirated CDs and DVDs. The market opened with the onset of capitalism and ended last year when the stadium was destroyed to make way for a new national stadium that was built in time to host Euro 2012. Collectively these series of objects evoke a sense of architecture, yet through absence they poignantly suggest that as with all structures we inhabit or that give form to our daily routines, social space is subject to change over time.

This exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Lethbridge, which will exhibit the works from September 28 – November 24, 2013.

Sosnowska is represented by Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne; Hauser and Wirth, Zurich, London and New York; Kurimanzutto, Mexico City and The Modern Institute, Glasgow.

MORE

Monika Sosnowska


What stories simmer just beneath the surface of the public spaces that we dwell in? What characters are the strangers we
brush shoulders with? What characters are we? Argentinean artist Mariano Pensotti’s ingeniously voyeuristic work Sometimes I think, I can see you places writers in public spaces and uses them as literary surveillance cameras. Over the three weekends of the 2013 PuSh Festival, a group of Vancouver writers including Michael Turner, Lisa C. Ravensbergen, Adrienne Wong, Kay Slater, Charles Demers, Anakana Schofield, OZ and Caitlin Chaisson, were stationed in the lobby of the Vancouver Art Gallery and the atrium of the Vancouver Public Library Central Branch equipped with laptops connected to projection screens. Their directive? To write a live account of whatever it is they saw — or imagine they saw — in these urban surroundings. Through the eyes and minds of these various writers, speculations unfolded, narratives were woven, and the anonymous individuals around us became implicated in a series of beautifully spontaneous fictions.

Mariano Pensotti is known internationally as one of the foremost directors in contemporary theatre. His work El pasado es un animal grotesco was presented on a revolving stage in the Fei and Milton Wong Experimental Theatre at PuSh, and his work La Marea presented outdoors in the streets of Gastown at PuSh 2011.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, The Playwrights Theatre Centre and Vancouver Art Gallery, and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

Produced with Ciudades Paralelas, a co-production between HAU Berlin and Schauspielhaus Zürich, in collaboration with Goethe-Institute Warschau and Teatr Nowy.

January 18-20, January 25-27 and February 1-3, 12-4 pm.

Located at the Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch Atrium and Vancouver Art Gallery, Lobby.

MORE

Mariano Pensotti - Sometimes I think, I can see you


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the Canadian premiere of two new films, by British artist Andrew Cross.

The Solo features Carl Palmer, legendary rock drummer of the 1970s supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, performing a series of specially composed drum solos in a work that explores the relationship between drummer and drum kit. The film examines different aspects of percussion, with the solo snare drum giving way to brushes, cymbals, hands, felt beaters, and finally a full drum kit solo. Through a process of rigorous editing, sequences of tightly framed images are constructed; Cross’ minimalist style giving rise to a consideration of the shifting nature of cultural value.

Ensemble is Cross’s latest collaboration with 1970s progressive rock musicians, focusing on a group once dubbed Europe’s biggest cult band: The Enid. Throughout their 36 year checkered history, The Enid have both captivated and confounded audiences, always defying clear categorization. In this characteristically restrained film—contradicting the conventions of the “rock-umentary” with the unlikeliest of rock stars—Cross presents an intimate portrait of enigmatic founder Robert John Godfrey together with current band members at their studio and collective home in Northampton, England, and their recent concert with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

In partnership with PuSh Festival and SFU Woodward’s.

MORE

Andrew Cross - The Solo & Ensemble


To create is to relate was the first exhibition in Canada of the influential work of Sister Corita Kent who came to fame for her silkscreen prints while teaching at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles in the 1960s. The exhibition developed in association with the Corita Art Center, Los Angeles and MOCFA, San Francisco focuses on Corita’s work from this period when we see the rapid visual move from a muted palette to one where figurative style is replaced by an increasing use of large areas of intense abstract colour. Mixing advertising slogans and poetry in her silkscreens and commandeering nuns and students to help make ambitious installations, processions and banners, Corita’s work is now recognized as some of the most striking – and joyful – American art of the 60s. The exhibition also shows a shift in the manner Corita brings words into her compositions often fragmented whereby they become image. The size of the serigraphs also increases and for Corita the absorption of the burgeoning media signage, commercial systems and slogans she saw play an important role in the development of her work. She embraced the urban environment, the commonplace becoming far from empty wasteland, rather a vehicle for hope and rejoicing. In someday is now (1964) for example, the partial block letters clearly derive from SAFEWAY supermarkets; somebody had to break the rules (1967) has the phrase jumbled but taken from a laundry detergent of the day.

Corita’s work and its community engagement marked a decade of utopian thinking but were rooted in the belief that direct action can cause real change. As such she asserts the continuum between daily life and art through her work, and challenges our expectations of what and how we encounter art. This lack of division between form and activity makes for a compelling argument against the notion of detached art experience both for artists and the audience. In this way, it chimes with the Contemporary Art Gallery in our belief that art and its conventions should not be divorced from our everyday experience and have meaning to everyone.

MORE

Corita Kent - To create is to relate


A Way To Go was the first part of the “GPS PROJECT” generated through the Education Program of Contemporary Art Gallery.

The word “Alley” comes from the original French root word “Allée” which literally translates as; A Way To Go. This was a walking journey project that consisted of using the GPS mobile device to navigate an alternative route through the downtown core by only taking alleyways and shortcuts. The passage was less distracting than crowded streets and avoided being a target for consumers by staying off the main roads. These routes are named after brief encounters with objects and/or subjects found in each individual alleyway rather than being named after important political figures or national historical references like most main roads in Vancouver. The names of the alley were included in the GPS map application. Through this journey, the participants came across site-specific installations, images activated by the GPS device, video clips and information about hidden spaces in the back alley.

Examples of this were images taken from inside an abandoned Japanese Auto Centre that has no access to the general public. Also an installation that was installed behind the fenced up corner in an underground parking lot to prevent homeless over-night staying, another example were details about a recycled water container underneath the Emery Barnes Park. This project continued to unfold describing more hidden objects/subjects in the allies of Vancouver’s downtown core over the following 3 months.

This program is generously supported by TELUS, 2010 Legacies Now and the Canadian Art Foundation. With thanks to Hannah Hughes and Autobox.

MORE

Ron Tran - A Way To Go


Clip/Stamp/Fold was the first exhibition of independent architectural magazines produced in the 1960s and 1970s. It was curated by renowned architectural theorist Beatriz Colomina and a group of PhD students at the Princeton University, School of Architecture. The exhibition was first presented in New York at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2006. It has since met great critical acclaim especially for remaining geographically specific to each city where it is presented. While the concept and presentation elements are portable, the archival magazines vary, being sourced from local collections. Since its debut in New York, it has traveled to the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal; Documenta 12, Kassel; AA, London; and Norsk Form, Oslo with plans to go to Madrid and Barcelona.

With the help of architectural critic and curator Adele Weder, the CAG researched and assembled from local collections architectural magazines for exhibition. Clip/Stamp/Fold also included custom wallpaper featuring images of the magazines, facsimiles of historical magazines for viewers to peruse, and a historical timeline examining the social and political contexts behind many of the collected magazines.

For Clip/Stamp/Fold 6, the CAG organized a comprehensive program of talks, inviting architects, writers and publishers from the region to respond to the exhibition. Beatriz Colomina gave public a lecture on the exhibition on October 14.

MORE

Clip/Stamp/Fold 6: THE RADICAL ARCHITECTURE OF LITTLE MAGAZINES 196X-197X


In celebration of its 30th Anniversary, the Contemporary Art Gallery presented an exhibition and project honoring its early years. On February 23, 1973, the Artists’ Gallery opened its doors at 555 Hamilton Street. Later to be renamed the Contemporary Art Gallery, the Artists’ Gallery was initiated by an arts advisory committee under the umbrella of the City of Vancouver. Central to its early mandate and philosophy was the promotion and creation of local visual arts.

During this time the City of Vancouver began a program, with assistance from the Federal Local Initiatives Program (LIP) to purchase works by local artists. In support of this ambitious project, the Artists’ Gallery was conceived as both a depository and exhibition space. The Contemporary Art Gallery continues to act as custodian for over 3000 collected works, many dating from the early to mid 1970s when the bulk of the collection was assembled.

The history of this important collection of art, of the Artists’ Gallery, and of the early years of the community that shaped what would become the Contemporary Art Gallery will be showcased this summer in an exhibition featuring works from the collection.

Project Organizers: Reid Shier and Shawn Preuss

MORE

L.I.P. Service, CAG 30th Aniversary: The Collection 1973-1983


Life Drawing Workshop: The Dancer’s Foot

Hosted by Field House Artist in Residence: Brendan Fernandes

Contemporary Art Gallery
(555 Nelson st.)

Tuesday July 15, 7-8:30pm

Free: Limited space, please RSVP to Learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca

Join our summer artist in residence Brendan Fernandes for a unique life drawing class focused on the dancer’s foot. Fernandes has invited dancers from BC Ballet to model their well-trained feet for drawing. Basic drawing materials will be supplied (paper, pencils, conte and charcoal) but participants are welcome to bring their own.

MORE

Life Drawing Workshop: The Dancer’s Foot


CAG volunteer Kay Slater gives a tour in French of the current exhibitions on display.

MORE

Downtown Gallery Tours: Audain Gallery, Satellite Gallery & Contemporary Art Gallery


Join us for free drop-in art making events for families. All ages are welcome!

Presented in collaboration with ArtStarts on Saturdays http://artstarts.com/free-weekend-workshops.

MORE

Summertime Free Family Days at the Gallery


A tour of the exhibitions on display in Spanish led by photographer Avelina Crespo.

 

MORE

Guided Visit in Spanish | Avelina Crespo


CAG volunteer Kay Slater gives a tour in French of the current exhibitions on display.

 

MORE

Guided Visit in French | Kay Slater


CAG Communications Coordinator Jill Henderson tours the exhibitions and explores the history of the CAG.

 

MORE

Guided Visit | Jill Henderson


Jaclyn Bruneau

CAG Visitor Assistant, Jaclyn Bruneau leads a tour of current exhibitions.

 

 

MORE

Guided Visit | Jaclyn Bruneau


CAG Curator of Learning and Public Programs Shaun Dacey will lead a tour of current exhibitions on display.

 

 

MORE

Guided Visit | Shaun Dacey


Olivia Qiu gives a tour in Mandarin of the current exhibitions on display.

 

MORE

Guided Visit in Mandarin | Olivia Qiu


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first solo exhibition in Canada of work by acclaimed German artist Jürgen Partenheimer. Reflecting the diversity of the artist’s practice, the exhibition comprises works on paper, text, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture, much of it produced in Vancouver in spring 2014 during his recent residency as the Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence, hosted by Emily Carr University of Art + Design .

 

MORE

Exhibition Opening - Jürgen Partenheimer: The Archive – The Raven Diaries


CAG Curator, Jenifer Papararo gives a tour of current exhibitions.

Guided visits are open to the public, providing free opportunities to engage with exhibitions and develop new skills for interpreting contemporary art. We also encourage visits from primary and secondary schools, ESL groups, university and college students and community groups. For more information or to book a guided visit for your group, contact learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca or telephone 604 681 2700.

MORE

Guided Visit | Jenifer Papararo


Screenings and reception at Western Front, 303 E 8th Avenue, Vancouver

Reception: Thursday, June 26, 7-9pm.
Screenings: Friday, June 27 – Sunday, June 29, 12 -5pm.

The Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG), Western Front and Dim Cinema present a weekend-long screening in the Grand Luxe Hall of 2014 Turner Prize nominee, Duncan Campbell’s film Bernadette, as part of the CAG exhibition The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes. Bernadette presents an open and indirect account of Irish dissident and political activist Bernadette Devlin, constructed out of archival footage from the 1960s and early 1970s. Campbell approaches documentary as form of fiction, revealing the complex relationship between author, subject and audience.

Duncan Campbell, born 1972 in Dublin, lives and works in Glasgow. His solo exhibitions include: Duncan Campbell, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2012);  Arbeit, Hotel, London (2011); Duncan Campbell, Belfast Exposed, Belfast (2011); Make It New John, Artist Space, New York and Tramway, Glasgow (2010); Duncan Campbell, Kunstverein Munich, Munich (2009); Bernadette, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2009); Bernadette and Sigmar, MUMOK, Vienna (2009); Art Now Lightbox: Duncan Campbell, Tate Britain, London (2009); 0-60, ICA, London (2008); Art Statements, Art Basel 38, Basel (2008); The Unnameable, Lux at Lounge, London (2006); Something in Nothing, TART Contemporary, San Francisco (2005); Falls Burns Malone Fiddles, Luis Campaña, Cologne (2004). His group exhibitions include: The Big Society, Galerie Vallois, Paris (2011); British Art Show 7,  Nottingham and Hayward Gallery, London  (2010); Critical Fetishes, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2010); Asking Not Telling, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2009);  Fight the Power, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2009); After October, Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York (2008); Art Now, Tate Britain, London (2006); The Need to Document, Halle für Kunst, Lueneburg (2005); Manifesta 5, European Biennial of Contemporary Art, San Sebastian (2004); Advertence, festival of documentary film , Belfast and Dublin (2003); Fresh and Upcoming, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt (2003); Shadazz, Royal College of Art, London (2002). He had been nominated for the 2014 Turner Prize.

MORE

Bernadette - Duncan Campbell


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm
Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri, one of the artists included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

MORE

Artist Talk - Maryam Jafri


Marie Lorenz
Beachcombers in Conversation
Vancouver Maritime Museum, 1905 Ogden Avenue
Vanier Park
Thursday, May 29, 6pm

Join us for a conversation with Burrard Marina Field House Studio artist-in-residence Marie Lorenz, artists Rebecca Bayer and Josh Hite plus invited locals who will discuss their relationship to beachcombing.

MORE

Beachcombers in Conversation - Marie Lorenz with artists Rebecca Bayer and Josh Hite


Two Beachcombing Workshops: Knot tying and Metal Detecting.
Sunday, June 1, 1pm-3pm – Free

MORE

Two Beachcombing Workshops: Knot Tying and Metal Detecting


Saturday June 14, 12–4pm
Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Mainland and Davie Street
Free, no registration required
Closing reception at the CAG, 6–9pm

Vancouverites of all ages are invited to take part in free hands-on drawing workshops, across the city in community centres, museums, art galleries, and on the street! Workshops, developed and led by professional artists, offer the opportunity
to rediscover drawing in everyday life. This day-long, city-wide celebration focuses on the process, pleasure and diversity of drawing, rather than on skill and technical ability.

For Vancouver Draw Down 2014 CAG hosts a workshop that works directly with Penner Bancroft’s installation at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station. Participants will develop their own collective drawing collage by taking tracings of Bancroft’s branches and adding them to an ever growing communal drawing.

MORE

Boulevard Station - Vancouver Draw Down workshop 2014


France-Vancouver: a curatorial conversation
Saturday, June 14, 6–8pm
Western Front, Grand Luxe Hall, 303 8th Ave East
Free, please RSVP to admin@front.bc.ca

Join a panel discussion with Claire Le Restif, director of CREDAC; Laurence Gateau, director of Frac des Pays-dela- Loire; Marie Cozette, director of La Synagogue de Delme; Vincent Verlé, director of Centre d’art Bastille in Grenoble; Alexandra Baudelot, co-director of Les Laboratoires d’Aubervilliers; and Marta Ponsa, director of artistic projects, le Jeu de Paume, hosted by Western Front and co-presented by
the CAG with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, UBC and Consulat général de France, Vancouver.

MORE

France-Vancouver: a curatorial conversation


Please join us to celebrate the opening of the exhibitions:

The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes

Stefan Brüggemann
Headlines and Last Lines in the Movies
Opening reception: Thursday, June 12, 7–10pm

 

MORE

New Exhibitions Open - The Act of Seeing with One's Own Eyes & Stefan Brüggemann


Brendan Fernandes
Tuesday, June 10, 7pm
Please join us for a talk introducing Fernandes’ residency, he will discuss his recent projects.

MORE

Artist Talk - Brendan Fernandes


Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15,  2pm Artist talk – 3-5 pm discussion
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655€ƒƒ Whyte Avenue

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio.

 

MORE

Artist Talk - Broken City Lab


Florence Derieux
Thursday, March 13, 7pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

Director of Frac Champagne-Ardenne, Florence Derieux will discuss her recent projects.

MORE

Curator Talk - Florence Derieux


Social Practice Pot Luck
Saturday April 26 7-9pm

To mark the end of Broken City Lab’s Field House residency we are hosting a pot luck and intimate conversation regarding social practice with special guest artist and Founder/Director of the Art and Social Practice MFA program at Portland State University, Harrell Fletcher. Fletcher is visiting Vancouver as a part of the ‘Working as an Artist’ workshop series at Purple Thistle and will be giving an artist talk at the Thistle (Friday April 25, 7:30pm) and leading a workshop (Saturday April 26, 1-4pm) with local artist Carmen Papalia. http://purplethistle.ca/

Bring a snack and join in on the conversation. Broken City Lab with Harrell Fletcher will lead an open conversation regarding the current state of social practice.

MORE

Social Practice Pot Luck with Harrell Fletcher


Tim Etchells
Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First
Monday, January 20  , 7 pm, by donation
The Fox Cabaret,  ‚2321  Main Street

Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First, written and directed by Tim Etchells, is a long free-associating
monologue that tumbles from topic to topic to create a vast, failing iteration and explanation of the world. Comical in its apparent naivety and preposterously encyclopedic in scope, the piece explores the absurdity and horror of consciousness as it tries and fails to seize and define everything that it encounters. Performed by Jim Fletcher, legendary New York actor, best known for his work with Richard Maxwell’s New York City Players and Elevator Repair Service’s Gatz, the monumental, word-for- word, eight hour staging of Fitzgerald’s prose masterwork. Join us post-performance for a drink and a conversation with Jim Fletcher and Tim Etchells, hosted by Norman Armour, Artistic and Executive Director of PuSh, in the newly renovated Fox Cabaret.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

MORE

Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First - Tim Etchells


Canadian Art Magazine Spring Launch
Saturday, April 12, 6–8pm
Join us for the launch of the new edition of the magazine.

Kevin Schmidt
Saturday, April 12, 5.15pm
As part of our contribution to the city wide Canadian Art Gallery Hop, this year artist Kevin Schmidt will lead a walking tour and discussion of the ideas and themes present in his exhibition.

In 2013, the CAG took  part in a schedule of events throughout the city. CAG Director, Nigel Prince gave a talk about our current exhibitions on display including works by Erin Shirreff, Nancy Holt and Raymond Boisjoly.

MORE

Gallery Hop Vancouver 2014 | Talk by Kevin Schmidt & Magazine Launch


Ant Hampton and Tim Etchells
The Quiet Volume
January 17–19,  24­–26€, 31‚, February 1– 2
12–ƒ5 pm (€…60 minutes, no intermission)
Performances every 20 minutes, last performance 4­:…ƒ05pm
Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch
3‚rd Floor, ‚ƒ… 350 West Georgia Street

In The Quiet Volume — set at the library, designed for two at a time — recorded instructions and a stack of carefully selected books direct you through this contemplative, self-generated performance. The Quiet Volume takes what is considered a deeply personal and internal process and pushes it out into the surrounding environment so that one reader’s sphere collides with another’s. It exposes the particular tension common to libraries worldwide: a combination of silence and concentration within which different peoples’ experiences of reading unfold. In this performance, you and your co-reader/fellow audience member study printed words, conjure mental images, examine the act of reading in a new light in this surprising piece of ‘autoteatro.’ For the bibliophile and reluctant reader alike, The Quiet Volume exposes the strange magic at the heart of the reading experience.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

MORE

The Quiet Volume - Ant Hampton & Tim Etchells


Tim Etchells
Tuesday, January 21, 4 .30 ‚…pm
Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema
SFU’s Goldcorp Centre for the Arts
149 West Hastings Street

In conjunction with the exhibition Who Knows, we join forces with PuSh to host Tim Etchells as a PuSh Festival   artist-in-residence and embrace the full scope of his practice. Whether, on stage or off, Etchells is concerned with liveness and presence and with the unfolding of events in time and place. At the centre of many of his projects, produced solely or with Forced Entertainment, there is a fascination with rules and systems in language, and in culture, and the way these systems are both productive and constraining. This artist talk forms a keynote
address as part of PuSh Assembly. Presented with PuSh International Performing Festival.

MORE

Tim Etchells - Keynote Speech


Interludes: Aurélien Froment
Monday, January 20 , 7.30 pm
Tickets $9 – $11– (plus $3 Cinematheque membership)
The Cinematheque, 1131 Howe Street

DIM Cinema, an ongoing series at The Cinematheque, presents videos by the French artist Aurélien Froment, to complement his first Canadian solo exhibition, at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Often using the format of instructional videos, Froment examines the semantic power of images and their elusive relationship to words. Viewers will emerge from the screening having learned more about the production of paper, the life cycle of the medusa, the ergonomics of sitting, the invention of kindergarten, the tying of knots and the palace of memory, than they ever thought possible in the space of 90 minutes. Each one of these analytical, self-reflexive studies works in its own way as a witty or poetic reminder that interpretation is subjective, meaning is never fixed and what one sees is not what others see.

Presented in association with The Cinematheque and PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

MORE

Screening - Interludes: Aurélien Froment


Join us at the CAG and the False Creek Community Centre for free hands-on drawing activities with CAG artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly as part of the city wide event DRAW DOWN. Join artist Raymond Boisjoly to invent new tools for drawing and create new, experimental drawings.

WHERE:
False Creek Community Centre
Granville Island, 1318 Cartwright Street

WHEN:
Saturday June 15, 1 – 4 pm, free

Raymond Boisjoly is the Contemporary Art Gallery Artist in Residence at Burrard Marina Fieldhouse beneath the Burrard Bridge. A Vancouver based aboriginal artist of Haida and Quebecois descent Raymond combines contemporary craft, pop culture and street art with traditional Northwest Coast imagery in his work.

Draw Down 2013: On Saturday June 15, 2013, twenty-three different arts and cultural organizations across Vancouver will host a wide array of diverse, hands-on drawing workshops in community centres, museums, art galleries and on the street!

http://www.vancouverdrawdown.com/

MORE

Re-inventing Drawing | Draw Down 2013


Button Wall was created for the CAG by Rethink Communications as the first step in the CAG’s first-ever public awareness media campaign. Fifty thousand buttons, each bearing a word that might describe your response to an artwork, were attached to the façade of our building. In less than 48 hours almost all of them have gone walking, attached to gallery visitors and now circulating among a vast potential audience for contemporary art in the city.

MORE

CAG Button Wall


Join us for family activities and create your own Corita silkscreen print on T-shirts, bags, banners and boxes or rubber stamped artwork. The workshop will be followed by a birthday procession through the Yaletown neighbourhood.

MORE

CAG Birthday and Family Day


Richter 858 - Bill Frisell in conversation with Nigel Prince
Held at The Vancouver Playhouse

Bill Frisell turns brushstrokes into sounds with Richter 858, a live, multi-media event that presents compositions inspired by eight abstract works by celebrated German painter Gerhard Richter, one of the most important visual artists working today.

Before the Vancouver premiere of the piece, also featuring music from Sign of Life: Music for the 858 Quartet, Frisell was joined by CAG Director Nigel Prince for a conversation about art as inspiration and music as the medium.

Presented in collaboration with Vancouver New Music.

MORE

Artist Talk | Bill Frisell


Aelita: Queen of Mars (USSR, 1924)
Director: Jakov Protazanov

Film Screening at Pacific Cinematheque

Programmed on the occasion of Orchardson’s Endless Façade this marks a partnership between the Contemporary Art Gallery and Pacific Cinematheque. The most celebrated Soviet film until Battleship Potemkin, and perhaps second only to Metropolis as the most influential science fiction movie of the silent era, the exotic, extravagant Aelita — the world’s first-ever feature film about interplanetary travel — is a key example of Constructivist decor and costume.

Black and white, DVD, 111 minutes. Silent with English intertitles and musical score.

MORE

Film Screening | Aelita: Queen of Mars


Please join us for a special one night film screening of four film works by Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson. Nancy Holt is one of the leading artists of her generation and a pioneer in conceptual, site-specific art and film and video work. She is one of a group of important international artists who initiated the Land art movement in the late 1960s. The Contemporary Art Gallery brings together a selection of photographs from 1967 onwards, many seen for the first time in public, alongside pivotal text and film works.

Nancy Holt
The Cinematheque
June 10, 2013, 7pm
Duration: approximately 83 minutes

Mono Lake (1968–2004)
Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson
19:54 minutes, color, sound 16 mm film transferred to video

Swamp (1971)
Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson
6:00 minutes, colour, sound 16 mm film transferred to video

Pine Barrens (1975)
30:24 minutes, colour, sound 16 mm film transferred to video

Sun Tunnels (1978)
26:31 minutes, colour, sound 16 mm film transferred to video

MORE

Film Screening | Nancy Holt


Free screenings of films about Corita’s life and work.
Become a Microscope: ’“ Statements on Sister Corita
(2009), a documentary by Aaron Rose.

MORE

Film Screening | Corita Kent


Yoga workshop held  in the gallery surrounded by the large-scale drawings by Chinese artist Guo Fengyi. The Contemporary Art Gallery partnered with Yoga Outreach and Master Tantric yoga teacher Mary-Jo Fetterly who led a class held in the context of the solo exhibition of Fengyi’s complex and intricate drawings.

 

MORE

Yoga in the Gallery


A yoga workshop was held  in the gallery surrounded by the large-scale drawings by Chinese artist Guo Fengyi. The Contemporary Art Gallery partnered with Yoga Outreach and Anasura yoga teacher Christine Price Clark to bring a special fundraising yoga workshop held in the context of the solo exhibition of Fengyi’s mystically complex drawings.

MORE

Yoga in the Gallery


Y-CAG

New Y-CAG starts in November!

Free Launch – Wednesday, October 16 – 5:00 pm at the CAG
Program Runs – Two Wednesdays each month from November, 2013 – May, 2014
Cost – $350

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Information Sheet

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Application Form

Y-CAG offers youth interested in contemporary art, visual culture and exhibition-making the opportunity to work closely with leading artists, curators, gallery staff and educators. Co-hosted by the Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Y-CAG will offer a behind-the-scenes look into both institutions, through gallery and facility visits.

Students will engage in discussions focusing on contemporary cultural issues; participate in the production of publications, events and presentations; and gain experience producing, installing and documenting artwork. Work produced in the program will culminate in a student-initiated ‘exhibition in print’.

  • Meet bi-weekly and build relationships with other creative teens, Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design staff, and visiting museum professionals and artists;
  • Identify interests and questions and use these to explore art through a variety of means, from looking, researching, and discussing to art making;
  • Place contemporary art within the context of what is going on in the larger world; and
  • Work with a variety of people and teen peers to create a public art exhibition or event.

Cost

The cost of the program is $350 for the entire six months and includes refreshments at each session.

Schedule

Teens will meet twice a month from 4:00 – 7:00 PM two Wednesdays of every month for afterschool meetings facilitated by educators and art professionals. Meetings will alternate between the CAG and Emily Carr.

MORE

Y-CAG launch event


In-conversation: James Welling and Dominic McIver Lopes
Wednesday, November 13, 7pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

Dominic McIver Lopes, Professor in the Department of Philosophy at UBC, and President of the American Society for Aesthetics, joins artist James Welling for a public conversation considering Welling’s practice.

MORE

In-conversation: James Welling and Dominic McIver Lopes


Please join us to celebrate the opening of exhibitions by James Welling and Meriç Algün Ringborg, Thursday November 14, 7-10 pm.

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a major solo exhibition of early work by American artist James Welling. Welling emerged as a seminal figure in the “Pictures Generation”, an influential group of artists including Sherrie Levine, Cindy Sherman and Richard Prince. Working in New York in the late 1970s and early 1980s, they were acclaimed for their pioneering use of photography and for opening up a new set of questions about art and the nature of representation. This exhibition, and the publication that accompanies it, are titled The Mind on Fire to evoke a febrile time of energy, thought and production from that period.

At the Contemporary Art Gallery we present a solo exhibition by Turkish artist Meriç Algün Ringborg, her first in a museum in North America, comprising a new large-scale commission sited across the façade of our building. Visitors are invited to ‘read’ the gallery, the work wrapping around the outside as individual phrases envelope the physical structure.

 

MORE

Exhibition Opening | James Welling and Meriç Algün Ringborg


Marie Lorenz
Saturday, December 7, 2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenue

Lorenz will present an introduction to her practice outlining the ideas, themes and methodologies which will provide the basis for her project to be developed in Vancouver.

MORE

Artist Talk | Marie Lorenz


Allison Collins is an independent curator, writer and researcher who lives and works in Vancouver, BC. Her recent curatorial projects have included Moveable Facture, VIVO, Vancouver; Suspicious Futures: Select Works of Susan Britton, V tape, Toronto, DIM Cinema, Vancouver and PLATFORM, Winnipeg; Hold Still Wild Youth: The GINA Show Archive, Or Gallery and VIVO, Vancouver. In 2011 she produced ARCLines a series of written profiles tracing the inception of Vancouver’s Artist-run Centre’s which was published on arcpost.ca. Collins currently holds the position of Adult Public Programs Coordinator at the Vancouver Art Gallery and was the Event Manager for Institutions by Artists: The Convention, a three-day international conference held in Vancouver in October 2012. Her writing has been published by C Magazine, Fuse, ArtSlant, Or Gallery, V tape and Publication Studio. Prompted by both Erin Shirreff and Nancy Holt’s exhibitions, Collins will share her research into the material nature of video and film.

MORE

Feedback Talk | Allison Collins


Sosnowska discusses her practice drawing on a range of key recent projects.The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first exhibition of work by Polish artist Monika Sosnowska in Canada. Best known for her ambitious architectural and sculptural installations which simultaneously embrace and resist the spaces they occupy, Sosnowska’s exhibition will obliquely reference her hometown of Warsaw and the economic shift that has occurred since the collapse of communism in 1989 to the present day.The Monika Sosnowska exhibition opens on Thursday June 27 and continues until August 25.
MORE

Artist talk | Monika Sosnowska


Join us over the summer at the Field House Studio for free drop-in art activities for all ages responding to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and our current CAG exhibitions: Monika Sosnowska, Itee Pootoogook and Kay Rosen.

Saturday, July 27, 1–4pm
Saturday, August 24, 1–4pm

MORE

Field House Studio | Saturday Family Days


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery and supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.This summer the CAG launches a new talks program inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.Artists in Public Speaker Series:Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard MarinaLanglois will discuss his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design.http://www.brokencitylab.org/projects/
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenuehttp://eblast.matchboxcreative.com/t/ViewEmail/y/098F9E3307BEFE89/2D08E80B14EDBD63F6A1C87C670A6B9F

MORE

Field House Studio - Artists in Public: Speaker Series | Justin A. Langlois


Please join FUSE magazine and the Contemporary Art Gallery to celebrate the launch of the FUSE Summer 2013 issue: Survivors and Survivalists in the CAG Field House Studio space at the Burrard Marina. The evening will feature a musical performance by artist and Dhrupad vocalist Harkeerat Mangat from 7-8pm followed by the DJ stylings of artist Helen Reed. Refreshments will be served. Suggested donation at the door includes a copy of the latest issue of FUSE and what is sure to be a fun evening on shore of False Creek.

MORE

Fuse Magazine launch and Performance - Burrard Marina Field House


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery and supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.This summer the CAG launches a new talks program inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.The first talk presents collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who are currently working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They will discuss this series of workshops which invite the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.Artists in Public:
Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Saturday, June 22, 4pm

http://unlearning-weekenders.tumblr.com/

Next up:
Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm

Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenue

http://eblast.matchboxcreative.com/t/ViewEmail/y/098F9E3307BEFE89/2D08E80B14EDBD63F6A1C87C670A6B9F

MORE

Field House Studio - Artist in Public Speaker Series | Zoe Kreye & Catherine Grau


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support and nurture artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launches a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
The first talk presents collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who are currently working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They will discuss this series of workshops which invite the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois will discuss his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Join us on the Field House Studio balcony for free drop-in art activities for all ages responding to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and our current CAG exhibitions.

Saturday, June 29, 1–4pm
Saturday, July 27, 1–4pm
Saturday, August 24, 1–4pm

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

Raymond Boisjoly, As It Comes continues until June 16 and is located in the window spaces at the CAG and off-site at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line and The Burrard Marina Field House Studio Residency Program.

As It Comes at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program — IntransitBC.

MORE

Field House Studio - Summer Programs


25th Annual Gala & Auction
Saturday November 2, 2013, 6.30pm
Rosewood Hotel Georgia
801 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, BC

This evening is an important benefit event for the CAG which allows us to continue our crucial role as the longest standing FREE independent public art gallery dedicated exclusively to presenting the very best in contemporary art from Vancouver, Canada and abroad.

TO PURCHASE TICKETS PLEASE CALL, Lisa Fedorak at tel: 604 681 2700.

Payment accepted by Visa, MasterCard or American Express or cheque.

No tickets are printed. Names will be on a list at the door.
Absentee bids will be accepted for those who cannot attend, click here to download the absentee bid form.

For absentee bids and enquiries  please contact Lisa Fedorak at auction@contemporaryartgallery.ca or 604-681-2700.

MORE

25th Annual Gala & Auction


CJSF interns Ana Costa + Anh Dang interview New York visual and video artist Maryam Jafri about her work AVALON (2011), which is Contemporary Art Gallery’s June 2014 exhibition The Act Of Seeing With One’s Own Eyes.

Jafri weaves themes of production, representation and role playing throughout her work.

Aired originally on CJSF’s Spoken Word Surprise July 1st (Tuesday 4pm)

Includes notes from CAG curator and excerpts from the June 26th artist talk.

www.maryamjafri.net/

Talk info + audio: www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/learning/a…yam-jafri/

MORE

CJSF Radio interview with Maryam Jafri


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm

Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri. Her video work Avalon (2011) is included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

In her moving image works, Jafri blurs the distinction between scripted films and unscripted documentaries. In Avalon (2011), Jafri seamlessly weaves together stories from real life workers in an unnamed leather company in an unspecified Asian country, with a script that she wrote herself. The workers in this factory are not told that they are making fetish products to be sold to the masses in the United States, and this selective disclosure can be seen in the disconnect between the production process and the final product itself. Parallels can be made between the secretive nature within the leather factory, the viewer’s unsurety of who is an actor and who is not, as well as to the overall editing process which yields a carefully restrained video work about the complex topics of overseas factories and the world of fetish paraphernalia.

Jafri’s solo exhibitions include: Mouthfeel, Gasworks, London (2014); Backdrop, Bielefelder kustverein, Bielefeld, Germany (2013); Stages, WYSPA Institute of Art, Gdansk (2012); Geographies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde (2012); Headlines and Small Print (with Anderas Fogarasi), Galerie Nova/WHW Zagreb (2012); Global Slum, Beirut, Cairo (2012) and Shanghai Biennial and Taipei Biennial (2012). She has also exhibited in group exhibitions including: Fassbinder Jetzt – Fassbinder and Contemporary Art, Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt (2013); Past is Present (Murals), Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Ten Thousand Wiles, Hundred Thousand Tricks, MuKHA, Antwerp (2013); When Attitudes Became Forms Become Attitudes, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Manifesta 9, Genk (2012). Maryam Jafri lives and works in New York and Copenhagen. She holds a BA in Literature from Brown University, an MA from NYU/Tisch School of The Arts and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

www.maryamjafri.net/avalon.htm

MORE

Artist Talk | Maryam Jafri


Night School is a series of informal lectures and studio visits that are intentionally accessible, yet intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent contemporary visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Guest instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world during four lectures and a suggested reading list complementing the discussion program.

Night School participants will also be involved in studio visits with three, internationally recognized, Vancouver-based artists. Steven Shearer, Geoffrey Farmer and Liz Magor have all held important exhibitions at the CAG and their projects will be introduced during the previous lecture. These field trips will be paired with cocktail events.

Night School offers direct access to and dialogue with artists and curators in the city. Alongside its curriculum, a passport of local events, openings and lectures will provide an expanded perspective on the Vancouver art scene plus opportunities to build a greater appreciation of art production and presentation in the city.

MORE

Night School


Y-CAG

New Y-CAG starts in November – still time to sign up!

Program Runs – Two Wednesdays each month from November, 2013 – May, 2014
Cost – $350

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Information Sheet

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Application Form

Y-CAG offers youth interested in contemporary art, visual culture and exhibition-making the opportunity to work closely with leading artists, curators, gallery staff and educators. Co-hosted by the Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Y-CAG will offer a behind-the-scenes look into both institutions, through gallery and facility visits.

Students will engage in discussions focusing on contemporary cultural issues; participate in the production of publications, events and presentations; and gain experience producing, installing and documenting artwork. Work produced in the program will culminate in a student-initiated ‘exhibition in print’.

  • Meet bi-weekly and build relationships with other creative teens, Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design staff, and visiting museum professionals and artists;
  • Identify interests and questions and use these to explore art through a variety of means, from looking, researching, and discussing to art making;
  • Place contemporary art within the context of what is going on in the larger world; and
  • Work with a variety of people and teen peers to create a public art exhibition or event.

Cost

The cost of the program is $350 for the entire six months and includes refreshments at each session.

Schedule

Teens will meet twice a month from 4:00 – 7:00 PM two Wednesdays of every month for afterschool meetings facilitated by educators and art professionals. Meetings will alternate between the CAG and Emily Carr.

MORE

Y-CAG Program with ECUAD


Emerging Dance Summer Intensive:

Call for participants ages 17 to 25yrs old

July 3 – September 4, 2014

(Every Tuesday and Thursday for three hour sessions)

Free

MORE

Deadline June 25 | Emerging Dance Summer Intensive: Call for participants aged 17 to 25yrs old


Brendan Fernandes
Tuesday, June 10, 7pm

Brendan Fernandes is a Canadian artist of Kenyan and Indian descent based between Toronto and New York City.
In this artist talk introducing Fernandes’ residency, he discussed his recent projects. This summer the CAG hosts a two month residency with Brendan Fernandes. At the core of the artist’s practice lies an investigation into the concept of authenticity, an ideological construct as a shaper of cultural experience.

MORE

Artist Talk | Brendan Fernandes


Dhrupad vocalist Harkeerat Mangat and Tabla drummer Sunny Matharu performed at the Burrard Marina Field House, Vancouver, Wednesday August 14. The occasion was a launch for the 2013 Summer issue of FUSE magazine.

Images by Maria Fedorova.
Sound by Phil Dion.

MORE

Harkeerat Mangat & Sunny Matharu - Perform Live at the Field House


Artist Sarah Browne discusses her work with CAG Director Nigel Prince, at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

MORE

Artist Talk | Sarah Browne


Landon Mackenzie: Map Room; The Act and State of Drawing. As part of Draw Down 2012, the city wide initiative, artist and educator, Landon Mackenzie orchestrated a day of drawing for visitors at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Rooted in her own practice and critical thinking, Mackenzie invited everyone to explore the potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being. This event was made possible with kind support from Opus Art and Framing.

MORE

Workshop | Draw Down 2012


Coast Salish artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun talks about his practice at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

MORE

Artist Talk | Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun


As someone who was born in the early 90′s and grew up as a teenager in the 2000’s, at times I forget what it was like before the age of the computer. While going through the Contemporary Art Gallery’s Auction archives dating back to 1989, it is fascinating to examine all the hand written documents, check lists and auction data transcribed on paper, instead of entered into Excel, Microsoft Word, or Raiser’s Edge.

It is amazing and a privilege to see how much the CAG and the Gala & Auction event has progressed over 25 years. I feel as if I am witnessing and contributing to its overall history and cultural significance – all the artists that have shaped the Vancouver arts scene, who have generously donated work to support a non-profit organization; an institution that strives to give back to the local, national, and international community, both arts and non-arts related.

It is intriguing to think of the initial Gala and Auction at Sophie’s Cosmic Café featuring works of artists who were both emerging and established at that time, and who have continued to significantly contribute to the art world in their own way. There were quite a few names that resurfaced over the 25 year span, as well as iconic names that represent historical transitions in the art world – such as artists of the 60s and 70s, like Mary Kelly and Nam June Paik who both donated work to the CAG’s Auction in 1993.

Nam June Paik was very influential in the art world during the 60s and is arguably considered the founder of video art. Paik and his wife Shigeko Kubota were involved in performance art during the Fluxus/Happening movement in the 60s – a key transition in the art world out of modernism into a postmodern mindset. Mary Kelly’s work is studied for its contribution to the Feminist dialogue that took form in the 70s – her piece, Post-Partum Document (1973-79), challenges the stereotype of pregnancy and what it means to be a mother.

Artists who donated work multiple times that are familiar in the Vancouver context are Landon Mackenzie, Jeff Wall, Ian Wallace, Marian Penner Bancroft, Ken Lum, and others.

The rich history located in the Contemporary Art Gallery’s Auction archives gives a precursor of what will be presented at the Gala & Auction this year, yet another chapter will unfold adding to the constantly evolving dialogue of the art world.

- Olivia de Fleuriot, Development Assistant

MORE

Into the CAG Auction Archives: How It All Began


I’m so honoured to have spent the week attending the Indigenous Acts: Art and Activism Gathering hosted by Dylan Robinson and Candice Hopkins! The Gathering was made up of Round Table Discussions, Sharing Circles, Site Visits, Provocation Discussions and A LOT of delicious meals!

Conversations were held around notions of land, public ceremony, contemporary Indigenous space and how artists are working towards reclaiming traditional space and places. Tania Willard, Raymond Boisjoly, Lorna Brown, Raven Chacon, Mimi Gellman, Duane Linklater, Joar Nango, Peter Morin and Karyn Recollet were some of the participants present for this inspiring and motivating gathering.

All present engaged in critical dialogue to discuss different ways to map space and time, ways to work with protocol and permissions, ways to critically look at borders and the various roles that language plays in these examinations. Re-occurring themes around embodiment, place, space, architecture, sound and identity flowed in and out of the discussions and helped make relations and connects between artists working in different mediums.

On August 5th we shared a dinner at the Burrard Civic Marina Field House. Over the course of the evening the participants wrote quotes, ideas and other kinds of messages to be projected onto the Burrard Bridge. It turned out really well, and generated a lot of laughs! After that we participated in making a light tipi with Cheryl L’Hirondelle. She gave us Sage smodging bundles and a flashlight and guided our bodies to create the structure. The wind played a part in this process as well- sometimes making the structure stronger, and other times blowing our smoke away.

I’m excited to have been able to sit, listen, talk, laugh and share food with those present at this gathering and am eager to see what they will work on next! Chi Meegwetch to all of you for sharing your talent and work with us over the past few days!

- Lindsay Lachance

MORE

Indigenous Acts: Art and Public Space Gathering


That’s me with a little bit of a smirk bidding last year at the annual Contemporary Art Gallery auction.

I’m pretty sure that smirk was a paddle-lifting induced buzz. It’s a natural high — nerve wracking, exhilarating, nauseating, and exciting, all at once, especially when there’s something that really speaks to you. Auctions are fun, and hopefully you’ll join us November 8th for our next one.

If you follow the CAG on Twitter or Facebook, you’ll see there’s all kinds of ways – most of them free! – you can come experience the exhilaration of art. Hanging out with art is a gift, and I’m proud to be able to be a service to the CAG and in some small way help ensure this institution can continue to provide that opportunity to everyone.

It’s meant a lot to my life. Contemporary art has so much to tell us about the world, about our experiences, and how we relate to each other. The wonders of the world and the magic of our complicated relationships to each other and to the current moment.

I can see or experience something that gives me that “a ha” feeling. Where the artist is able to evoke something that maybe has crossed my often too busy brain, but that I was unable to express or quantify. An elegant representation of a feeling or a sense that I wasn’t sure I had. I’ve caught myself at times in galleries silently nodding as this thing that was on the tip of my tongue is represented to me, and there’s a kind of feeling of relief that goes with that. It’s magical to me in those moments.

Almost, dare I say, a place where I experience spirituality – my connection to the bigger we.

Sometimes it might take me to a place of sadness. Social anxiety; human suffering; the loss of love; the struggle with sorrow. Sometimes it’s joyous, or funny. Outrageously ridiculous, or ridiculously outrageous….those moments are the best! I’ve even at times been disgusted by pieces of contemporary art where I’ve walked in and turned around moments later.

But it’s all good as the saying goes…it all matters, it all sticks and swirls around inside and makes some sense of the sometimes chaotic world we live in and that lives in us. It is all worth it for the sense it provides that we are not alone in the universe. That the infinite uniqueness of our experiences can be represented and shared and we have places like the CAG where we can gather to experience, discuss, and celebrate them.

It’s pretty great.

Please keep in touch, and I hope to see you soon at a CAG event.

 

Marcella Munro became President of the Board of the Contemporary Art Gallery on June 19, 2014.

MORE

Marcella Munro, Art is a Gift


This past Saturday, the CAG held its monthly Family Day. Participants crafted landscape collages in response to Kelly Richardson’s Legion. A few of the volunteers and I decided to have a little fun and create our own! From the beginning of my piece’s construction, I had a vague idea of what I wanted my collage to look like. Halfway through, however, I realized it had completely changed as I sorted through the materials we had and gained new inspiration.

Experiencing this process myself got me thinking about the art-making process in general. Artists may start with a certain idea about how they want a piece to look, but the finished product is often very different from the initial plan.

On looking through the CAG exhibition archives, an exhibition in 2010 by artist Elizabeth McIntosh, Violet’s Hair, explicitly seems to address the artistic process. Vancouver based, McIntosh is known for her abstract paintings. When one looks closely at many of her canvasses, faint clues to how the paintings have evolved can be seen. As well as a selection of paintings McIntosh also transformed a gallery room into a collage itself. Colours From a Story (2010) overlaid large, colourful pieces of paper in various sizes creating a sculptural representation of her art-making process. This piece addressed how McIntosh approaches painting; various colours overlapping creating new shapes and the painting itself revealing process and change.

This idea can also be applied to how we view art ourselves. Approaching art that we have never before seen, we often do so with uncertainty. One can never know how the experience will be until we are in front of it and letting our imagination run wild. Sometimes it is useful to wait to read about an exhibition until after you go through it for the first time, allowing yourself to creatively contemplate what it means to you at first glance.

We hope that you will visit us at the CAG for the next family day on Saturday, August, 30 (12-3pm) to enjoy the making and the experience of art.

- Kelli Sturkenboom, Communications intern

MORE

From the Archives | Art-Making & Artistic Process


Burrard Marina Field House Artist in Residence, Brendan Fernandes and Vancouver-based choreographer Justine Chambers led a workshop for the Summer intensive program this week that explored collaboration, conceptualization and authorship. Brendan and Justine are very generous instructors and really encouraged the participants to express themselves through an embodied practice and collaboration.

Justine and Brendan led exercises that brought the participants and their interests together through embodied practice. The participants were asked to write a performance choreography score in five minutes that would have a five minute performance time. After writing their pieces, they put them in the middle and everyone chose someone else’s choreography to perform. We saw people working with their bodies, with the spectators bodies, with the room, with chairs, with shoes… with whatever was in sight! Through this work the participants learned how to conceptualize, create and rehearse a full piece. The group will create their own performance at the end of this program so this work was a great start in helping them learn to share, create and perform ideas.

- Lindsay Lachance

MORE

Conceptualizing and Authorship with Brendan Fernandes and Justine Chambers


Recently Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Brendan Fernandes held a life drawing class at the CAG. The gallery was buzzing with over twenty-five artists and the model, Rachel Meyer, a member of Ballet BC. Fernandes worked with Rachel to create a multitude of poses on various sized plinths that highlighted her feet and encouraged participants to focus on this area.

The drawing tasks varied from 30 seconds to 5 minutes then 20 minutes poses. It was really amazing to see the range of differences in drawing style and form that everyone used to interpret Rachel’s poses. We got great feedback from the participants and we’re hoping to hold more life drawing classes at the CAG in the future.

Check out some of these amazing life drawings above and stay tuned to find out more about Brendan Fernandes residency!

- Lindsay La Chance

MORE

Life Drawing with Brendan Fernandes: Seeing the Dancer’s Foot


As the new Development Assistant for the Contemporary Art Gallery’s 26th Annual Gala & Auction, I am so excited to be a part of the CAG’s team and to connect with the CAG’s surrounding community.

My name is Olivia de Fleuriot de la Coliniere – I usually shorten my last name to de Fleuriot to avoid confusion or bewilderment. I was born in Durban, South Africa and moved to Toronto with my family when I was five years old. I grew up amongst creativity and colour, which encourages me to pursue my passion to create and study fine art. I recently completed my Bachelor of Art degree, majoring in Art + Design, at Trinity Western University and will be continuing this upcoming academic year as an Honours student. I aspire to pursue a career in a gallery setting and educational environment, as well as my own artistic practice.

The team here, at the CAG, has been welcoming and supportive. I work directly with Sue Lavitt, Head of Development and Communication, and also other staff and volunteers at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

It has been an exciting adventure corresponding, researching, and writing about the various artists being presented at the gala fundraiser this year. I can’t wait for you to experience the fantastic night and participate by supporting both the artists and the CAG in their role locally, nationally, and internationally. It is very tempting to blurt out the broad display of talent being presented this year, but I shall keep you in suspense a bit longer!

I am quite happy to say that my experience here at the Contemporary Art Gallery does not end this August. Before my current position, I volunteered and assisted Shaun Dacey, the Curator of Learning and Public Programs, with research and educational practices. From this experience I will be co leading the Family Day events that take place the last Saturday of every month. It would be great to see you at a Family Day event or at the Annual Gala & Auction this fall!

There will be more blogs coming up to give you a taste of this year’s Gala & Auction in retrospective of a 25 year history.

- Olivia de Fleuriot

MORE

Hello from Olivia de Fleuriot!


As I mentioned in my National Aboriginal Day post I headed down to the Trout Lake Community Center to experience and participate in the fun! It was a beautiful sunny Saturday where everyone was enjoying the weather, the food, the company and the performances!

We attended the performance of Songs for Reconciliation,a part of  William Hiłamas Edward Wasden Jr‘s  residency with  The Vancouver Park Board.  Wasden Jr brought Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples together to learn, share and perform Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw cultural stories, songs and dances. The project focused on revisiting cultural histories and knowledges that emphasize the importance of creating and maintaining loving relationships within families and especially towards children. William shares cultural knowledges and histories so that the participants and the audience can reflect on the many cultural elements that have been suppressed due to the residential  school systems.

We heard songs for young boys learning to hunt, songs for infant and toddlers, and one called the duck song. The audience was encouraged to participate and sometimes the dancers would  take you by the hand to get up and dance with them!

Another part of the project allowed for the participants to make their own regalia. Each piece was handmade, generally in black or red and had an animal on the back.

This collaborative residency allowed for Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities to learn, remember, and share in Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw cultural knowledges and stories. As an Anishnaabe person I was honoured to be there, and to have shared in the performance of this work!

Meegwetch (Thank you)  William for initiating this project and for sharing your stories, songs and dances with us!

MORE

William Wasden Jr: City of Vancouver Artist in Residence Performance


Wine & cheese boards — engaging critical & theoretical discussions about contemporary art in Vancouver — where do I sign up?!

Night School is a new intensive program  for anyone interested in broadening their understanding of contemporary art. Facilitated by independent curator Lee Plested, participants engage in seminars, studio visits and special events in order to unpack the concepts and thematics of contemporary practice via the history of CAG exhibitions.

Lee Plested is an engaging and charming lecturer who encourages group discussion from those in attendance. At last Thursday night’s seminar Plested introduced works by Stan DouglasRebecca Belmore, Nan Goldin and Stephen Waddell. He clearly articulates the social, political and historical themes particular to each artist. He then initiates critical discourse forming relationships between each. The round table format is very inviting and allows for insightful critical dialogue.

In addition to studio visits and talks, Night School participants will attend exhibition openings and other arts and culture events across the city! This is an amazing initiative that introduces its students to the multiple ways in which conversations regarding the philosophical, aesthetic, socio-political and creation processes of contemporary art can be articulated and received. The CAG is currently planning a second session of Night School in early 2015. This is something you won’t want to miss so stay tuned for more information regarding registration and programming!

- Lindsay Lachance

MORE

Night School at the CAG: Teaching us to say what we mean & mean what we say


A Vancouver Draw Down report…

On Saturday June 14 I spent the afternoon at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station with CAG Development Assistant, Olivia and CAG volunteer, Alex as a part of Vancouver Draw Down: the annual city-wide event that invites Vancouverites of all ages to take part in various drawing activities.

The CAG’s contribution to the day-long event was Boulevard Station a drawing workshop that saw participants trace over the top of Marian Penner Bancroft’s installation Boulevard  at the Canada Line’s Yaletown-Roundhouse Station.

Boulevard, a work of mirrored and kaleidoscoped Golden Elms and Sequoias trees, was a perfect venue for our tracing activity. All afternoon we traced different areas of Bancroft’s mural with charcoal, conte, pencils, markers or whatever else people wanted to work with! We got some amazing, creative and beautiful images! Even if the same spot was retraced, they still turned out looking unique and captivating. After each trace was finished we added them to a piece of plywood and created our own hybrid kaleidoscope community tree. It was amazing to see all the different styles, colours and lines that make up one abstract tree, see above for pics from the day and of the drawings made.

We had a great time and I can’t wait to be a part of more public program events at the CAG!

 

MORE

Rounding up Yaletown at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station for Draw Down


On Thursday, December 12th, the Point Grey Secondary grade twelve, Art Careers class visited the Contemporary Art Gallery for a full day workshop. 

They spent the day exploring James Welling’s exhibition The Mind On Fire with a focus on studying curatorial practice and conceptual art practices.  As part of the investigation they undertook an experiential response to Welling’s working methods, by conducting a photo-shoot in which students were asked to explore in-camera abstraction techniques. They spent their lunch hours creating images while exploring downtown Vancouver. 

The students were interested in questioning our assumptions of perception and the photographic image, as well as how the inherent ambiguity affected the reading of an image. The students met afterward to discuss and edit the images and categorize them based on the abstraction technique or subject matter of the photographs.  In effect the students curated an exhibition of photography, taking a cue from Welling in grouping images based on intended effect.

The CAG is excited to present a selection images of their work, see above for a slide show. A big thank you to the whole Point Grey HS  Art Careers class and the artists we are presenting here: Kiel Torres, Catherine Wang, Cosette Bote, Aly Slobadov, Nancy Tseng, Forever Young, Kevin McAllum. They’ve posted more images on their Point Grey Art Blog.

The CAG welcome groups of all ages and levels for free guided visits. We also produce guided visits with art-making responses to the exhibitions on display.

Contact s.dacey@contemporaryartgallery.ca for more information.

- Shaun Dacey, Curator of Learning and Public Programs

MORE

Brains ‘A’ flame: Point Grey High School’s response to James Welling’s “Mind on Fire”


Fresh in town from originally Windsor, via Montreal, Justin Langlois gave a talk at the Burrard Marina Field House about his ideas and his work on Saturday, August 17th. He brought with him a pamphlet of thought-provoking slices of his personal and artistic philosophy, which he flipped through over the duration of the talk as a prompt for further musings and discussion. He’s happy to share it with us in the images above, along with a video he made titled ‘Windsor is Forever’.

MORE

Limits & Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life – by Justin Langlois


On Monday, October 7th we attended a potluck get-together for everyone involved in the City of Vancouver’s Field House Residence Program at Roundhouse Community Centre. There were heaping plates of kale, rice, beans and hummus, mini glasses of wine, and three hours worth of interesting presentations about what each group of artists are doing to make the most of their unique locations.

One of my favourites was the Loco Moto Art Collective, located in the Aberthau Mansion at West Point Grey Community Centre. Spearheaded by Laura Lee Coles but including around 20 others, the group works  broadly in the realm of digital media, eco-aesthetics, and the relationships between humans, technology and nature. They are the newest Field House to have set-up shop, and they’ve already hosted a few events indoors and outdoors. They seem to have lots of wild and wonderful things coming up for the new year. They’ll be launching a new exhibition called No Memes No at Hot Art Wet City at 2206 Main Street on the spookiest day of the year–October 31st.

Another group that piqued my interest was Cloudscape Comics. They’re located at 5955 Ross Street inside the Memorial Park South Field House. The 30 of them approach the production of comics from different backgrounds, which makes their oeuvre very dynamic. There’s something for everyone and they release an anthology of comics every year. They recently posted a call-out for submissions with Sci-Fi/Fantasy comics with queer characters and themes. They offer a free drop-in comic jam every Wednesday starting at 7:30pm at their Field House.

And these are only a few examples of the 50 artists who are enlivening 13 spaces in parks around the city. It was awesome to hear about the ways that other artists are negotiating the best use of their spaces, and it’ll be great to keep an eye on all these projects that are largely community oriented and site specific.

- Jaclyn

MORE

Field House Meet-up Day


Nathan Crompton gave a lecture and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field House on Saturday, September 28th. We asked him a few questions in preparation for the event, and are now bringing you the second half of the session (the first part can be found here). We’re grateful for the insight and perspective that Nathan brings to this crucial and ever-timely subject matter and look forward to further expanding this dialogue with him and the community.

JB: For people who may not understand the complexity of the power relations embedded in gentrification and may therefore see neighbourhood improvement as simply that, how would you explain to them that the “polishing up” comes at a high cost to a basic, and long-compromised human right—especially for the (large) indigenous population of the area?

NC: That’s a difficult question. I might only be able to point to a contradiction. Currently our neoliberal cities are crumbling before our eyes, with the massive de-funding of basic services both in terms of the human and architectural infrastructure. I’m talking about an entire generation of infrastructure left behind by the welfare state, whether it’s Simon Fraser University, Heather Place or Little Mountain – they’re all in shambles as the war on the poor and working class intensifies. Social democracy, with all of its flaws and compromises – particularly its framework of patriarchal white supremacy – has now been replaced by neoliberalism.

Neoliberal urbanism states that improvements to the city can only be supported if they are funded privately, first by private capital and secondly by the retroactive bonuses, tax cuts and fee exemptions created by the municipal colonial state. Since being elected, Vision Vancouver has taken this model to its highest possible level, setting in motion an entire bureaucracy whose sole purpose is to move social funds upwards, particularly (but not exclusively) for the monopoly developers who fund the political apparatus. So the axiom of our generation is revitalization and improvements, yes, but the precondition is that these improvements only for those who can afford it, under the guise of urban revitalization. It is therefore hard today to discuss urban improvements in an abstract way, detached from class and colonialism. Who is benefitting from revitalization, who is losing out? Does it always have to be the propertied class who determine what is the “highest and best use”? Real-estate knows how to follow through on a process of colonization to gain returns on value, but can we respond with a new affirmation of value, independent from capitalist accumulation and the displacement of our communities? Those are some of the questions we’ve been asking.

JB: The pro-development side seems to argue that gentrification is justified by the fact that the residents in the DTES of today are not in a position to pay the requisite costs to live in a neighbourhood whose real estate potential is exorbitant. What they fail to realize is that the neighbourhood functions as a community and refuge for people who have largely been displaced and dispossessed previously—in some cases several times, by the same system that is trying to again remove them. How can we conceive of a way to bridge this gap between seeing a neighbourhood as dollar signs and seeing a neighbourhood as inhabited by a vulnerable population with a strong existing community?

NC: The events of Reconciliation are coming to a close here in Vancouver. Yesterday Vancouver City Council also apologized to the Japanese community for its motion in 1942 supporting the expulsion and internment of Japanese Canadians during the war. Now is a good time to ask, reflectively, if we want to continue repeating the mistakes of the past. Grace Eiko Thomson told city council that apologies and reconciliation mean nothing in the context of accelerating displacement and dispossession.

“For me, an apology is not enough unless it is followed up. Not for us, it’s too late for us. Most of us are gone. Most of us who experienced the internment are gone. It is so important we remember that what happened to us can happen to others. That is why I raise the Downtown Eastside because that is where we used to live. That is where we were displaced from. And the original people were the Coast Salish first nations who were originally displaced.

She continued: “For me, I really feel we have to be vigilant about other people who are still living in this area at the moment who are still socially and economically being excluded, particularly with this big talk about gentrification. The developers are moving in, the price of land is going up. So what does this mean for the people that are living there? Does that mean they are going to be displaced again? I hope not. This is the most important thing to me right now, that this doesn’t happen to another group of people. This is a unique community with a unique history and there are still people living here who may be displaced depending on how the city decided to act on this area…”

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

MORE

Nathan Crompton Interview (Part 2 of 2)


I think we should all be restless in where we are — not towards accumulation, but towards an urgency in wanting to better understand the world around us.”
– Justin Langlois

Justin Langlois has recently moved to Vancouver from Windsor, Ontario. He’ll be joining the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design this Fall, and the CAG invited him to speak about his practice at the Burrard Marina Fieldhouse on Saturday, August 17th. He is co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an “artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore and unfold curiosities around locality, infrastructures, and creative practice leading towards civic change,” and he had lots to share about his background, but more so, his present and future.

He has developed his own brand of social rehabilitation in post-Fordist Windsor—a place which he believes is useful to think about in terms of potential opportunities, rather than as plagued by crisis. For Langlois, his entry into art was not one rooted in a studio practice, but instead in artistic efforts that mobilize several artists and ideas—like organizing rock shows, or producing a 200-copy newspaper. It seems inevitable that his small-town upbringing can be cited as an enabler for his enlightened sense of engagement and facilitation.

He touched on some key areas of the organization’s operational pedagogy and flipped through a small pamphlet (click here to view the pamphlet), sharing each page one-by-one. Each page expressed a carefully crafted opinion or idea that followed suit with its title, Limits and Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life—a title originating from Langlois’ belief that it is easier to begin acting and creating within a defined area, instead of trying to wrangle with infinity. He talked about the necessity to re-think the words and terms that we have come to establish meanings for which are insufficient; things like social change, engagement, public participation, and education. He encouraged the audience to consider each point to act as an entry from which a larger conversation could develop, and people responded at the end with thoughtful and sincere rebuttals. It’s only a matter of time ‘til we see what kinds of projects Langlois brings to life in Vancouver.

MORE

Artists in Public | Justin Langlois Talk


Another sunny Saturday brought lots of folks ’round for our 3rd and final Family Day of this summer season. Ros offered a step-by-step demo of how to create functional pinwheels of all shapes and sizes. There were lots of different papers, from patterned origami to neon construction, and some sparkly pipe cleaners to add that final zing. Thanks to everyone who came out for our Family Day series this summer and we hope to see you all soon.

MORE

Family Day – Pinwheel Making at the Field House


Collaborators, Catherine Grau and Zoe Kreye met while attending the MFA program in Public Art and New Artistic Strategies at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany. It was here that the conceptual basis for their artistic practice was born. Along with a group of about 15 others’ recently spent an afternoon with them at the Burrard Marina Field House. While sitting on the Field House lawn overlooking a view of hundreds of boats, they gave a full overview of their most recent project, Unlearning Weekenders.

Over the duration of the talk, we were introduced to the notion of ‘unlearning’. Grau and Kreye shared texts and theories that influenced them in the development of their project and their own approach to ‘unlearning’. Through their ideas they sought to reassess, deconstruct, look within, or question the things considered to be ‘given’ in our culture.

They spoke of the desire to imagine and make gestures toward decolonizing and deinstitutionalizing today’s monochromatic educational and economic systems. They discussed the ways our current systems fail to address individuals, our hominal wants and needs; how they divide us from our bodies and how they prevent us from knowing ourselves in a way unobstructed by the dogmas that tell us how to be. Zoe illustrated this by mentioning that in every level of our education and work (middle school, high school, post-secondary, professionalism) we involve our bodies increasingly less.

Responding to these ideas, Grau and Kreye’s research led them to forms of physical movement and dance in an ‘attempt to replenish themselves’ from the rigor of both creating and giving.

Throughout the talk the artists shared their experiences, including, developing a 12-hour procession through the city with various local community groups and individuals. Numerous activities occurred through this procession, including: a stick-listening event at Third beach; a backwards walking procession underneath Canada Place; walking across Burrard Bridge all tied to each other and burying themselves in the sand while listening to one participant reading Some Thoughts on the Common Toad by George Orwell.

A good portion of the audience were participants in the weekend procession (hence the Weekenders part of the title). Their presence enriched the discussion with meaningful reflections, questions and contemplations. The artists were receptive and enthusiastic about the insights, and seemed to be mentally banking them for future consideration as they move forward.

I left full of appreciation, excitement and hope about the process of inquiry and making earnest attempts to cultivate a kind of purity of the self. Throughout the talk, I realized their work could not be separate from who they are, their research and the way it feeds into their art, is about shedding the cultural sludge that becomes attached to us. This was epitomized by their relaxed attitude to the occasional sound of planes overhead. They simply paused and waited for it to pass.

For more information on the project, check out their website.

This artist talk was the first of many that will take place at the Field House. We’ll be hosting Family Days on Saturday July 27 and August 24, 1-4 pm. If you want to make sure not to miss anything, keep an eye on our Twitter, Facebook, and get on the mailing list (scroll to the bottom right on the page) to receive our updates.

- Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver.

MORE

Field House Update: Unlearning Weekenders Artist Talk – Catherine Grau & Zoe Kreye


Today, the CAG (and people across Canada) celebrate Nunavut Day, a day that commemorates the NLCA (the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement). The NLCA is the largest comprehensive claim settlement in Canada, and it marked the first time that the Canadian map has changed since 1949 (with the incorporation of Newfoundland and Labrador).

Nunavut Day is a day to celebrate arctic traditions and the northern way of life. As our current exhibition features Inuit artist Itee Pootoogook, we invite anyone interested in celebrating Nunavut Day in Vancouver to join us and experience his work.

While you might seek out Wikipediato learn more about Nunavut today, the listing doesn’t say much about their fine arts scene. There has been an accelerated change in artistic expression in the past 50 years as many modern Inuit artists react to the present and the wider, more accessible world. Today’s northern nunavut artist is not as isolated, and the work produced is more contemporary, but no less representative.

If you are unable to make it today to the gallery, be sure to visit us on our forthcoming English, French, and Spanish tours of the current CAG exhibitions.

As I was researching more about Nunavut Day, I learned that while the official languages of Nunavut are English and French, 8% of the population speaks neither English, French, nor Inuktitut (the primary language of Nunavut). Unfortunately, my language skills are limited to English and French, so to those remaining 8%, I say: Nunavut Quviahugvik (Happy Times Nunavut in Inuinnagtun!)

***

Aujourd’hui, le CAG (et les personnes à travers le Canada) célèbrent la journée Nunavut qui commémore l’ARTN (Accord sur les revendications territoriales du Nunavut). L’Accord est le plus important règlement de revendications territoriales au Canada, et il a marqué la première fois que le plan canadien a changé depuis 1949 (avec l’incorporation de Terre-Neuve et Labrador).

La journée du Nunavut est une journée pour célébrer les traditions arctiques et la vie nordique. Comme notre exposition actuelle présente l’artiste inuit Itee Pootoogook, nous vous invitons à célébrer la journée du Nunavut à Vancouver avec nous et à découvrir son travail.

Alors que vous pourriez rechercher Wikipedia pour en savoir plus au sujet du Nunavut aujourd’hui, l’article ne dit pas beaucoup à propos de leur beaux-arts. Il y a eu un changement accéléré dans les expressions artistiques dans les 50 dernières années et nombreux artistes inuits modernes réagissent à l’actualité et à le monde plus accessible. Ces artistes d’aujourd’hui n’est pas aussi isolé, et le travail qu’ils produisent est plus contemporain, mais non moins introspective.

Si vous n’arrivez pas à venir aujourd’hui à la galerie, n’hésitez pas à nous rendre visite à nos visites guidées à venir en anglais, français, et espagnol de les expositions au CAG.

Comme je faisais des recherches au sujet de la journée du Nunavut, j’ai appris que même si ses langues officielles sont l’anglais et le français, 8% de la population ne parle ni anglais, ni français, ni l’inuktitut (la langue principale parlé au Nunavut). Malheureusement, mes compétences linguistiques sont limitées à l’anglais et le français (rouillée), donc à ceux qui tombent au 8%, je dis: Nunavut Quviahugvik (temps heureux Nunavut!)

MORE

Happy Nunavut Day | Joyeuse journée du Nunavut


Hello one and all,

I’m Jaclyn Bruneau, the CAG Field House intern currently working with Raymond Boisjoly during his summer artist-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. I’ll be keeping people in the loop about his activities, and with Field House events by reporting in this blog. Look for posts with the ‘Field House Studio’ blog category and keep your dials tuned in.

A few Saturdays ago, Raymond and I spent the afternoon at False Creek Community Centre where he led a workshop as part of the Vancouver Draw Down, that very cool single-day drawing festival that invites Vancouverites to access various types of drawing workshops for free, held in over 23 locations city wide. The workshop was titled Re-Inventing Drawing and began invitingly with tables scattered with pipe cleaners, masking tape, paper cups, tree branches, string, scissors, pieces of paper big and small, and a ton of markers all of which were used together or separately to create fantastically experimental gestural marks on paper.

Our first two visitors were a pair of twins named Alex and Liam, who seemed to have made use of all the materials. They taped felts all around the parameter of the paper cup; strung together branches, attaching a pen on each end and then twirling the contraption above paper; and stuck felts through holes in foamy paper. Their mom seemed blown away at all the things they came up with. Some others made contraptions with the branches that allowed two people to each take hold of a part of the branch, and proceed to see if they could collaboratively render an image they thought up together beforehand. Raymond even drew my attention to a mystery visitor who got carried away with their new tools on the hardwood floor (oops!). Above are some photos from the workshop.

During the afternoon’s workshop the space was flooded with natural light and we left the doors wide open, so people walking the path outside could peek in and join. We met daughters and dads, kids in strollers, couples, best friends, and even a few grandparents. It was amazing how little instruction everyone needed. They seemed full of ideas, and were very eager–especially those itching to fill their Draw Down passports with stamps. I floated around taking photos and getting people started. Raymond seemed to know exactly what to say in the way of inspiration for those stuck for an idea.

- Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

News from the Field House & fun with Draw Down!


New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées

Did you know that there is a free guided visit at the CAG almost every week during an exhibition? | Savez-vous qu’il y a une visite guidée chez la galerie d’art contemporain presque chaque semaine au cours d’une exhibition? (lisez ce poste en français).

The CAG team has worked very hard to ensure that guided tours are scheduled regularly throughout the course of our exhibitions, and that dedication has given recently given birth to a new series of tours starting this month: multi-language guided visits. For the first time ever, our guided visits are now offered in Mandarin and Spanish!

I have been proud to present our guided visits in French for the past 3 exhibitions, taking over from artist Patricia Huijnen following her return to Switzerland last year. It’s been a real pleasure for me, as I love the French language and often lament that I do not have the chance to speak it as much as I would like. I also love talking about art, and the opportunity to do so at the Contemporary Art Gallery is both challenging and satisfying. Contemporary art can be difficult to understand at first glance, and bringing context, new ideas, and new ways of thinking to visitors has been, for me, an incredibly rewarding privilege.

When I was in school, it was always a struggle to fully appreciated fine-arts field trips when the exhibitions weren’t being presented in the language in which we were being instructed. My teachers would be diligently providing us with French vocabulary and tools with which to engage with the art, but when it was time to visit a gallery, museum or event, it was often jarring to listen to tours in English. There was something really special about the tours that were offered in French.

When Shaun Dacey, our new Curator of Learning and Public Programs, joined the CAG team in April, I wrote to him to tell him about how much I loved working in French at the CAG. Imagine my delight, when he not only echoed my enthusiasm, but informed me that he was already working to add additional language tours to the schedule.

Tommy Ting hosts CAG guided tours in MandarinI attended the Mandarin tour, hosted by artist Tommy Ting, on Saturday the 18th, and was delighted to see the engagement in our visitor’s faces while they discussed and engaged with the work in their own language. While I was unable to make the following week’s tour, hosted by photographer Avelina Crespo, I have been told it was well attended and equally well received. Both Tommy and Avelina have agreed to join us again later this summer to again present Mandarin and Spanish language tours at our upcoming exhibition.

I am truly proud to be part of the team providing multi-language tours at the CAG. I invite you to join me on June 1st at 3PM for my guided visit, in French, of the Nancy Holt/Erin Shirreff exhibition currently on display at the CAG.

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a Vancouver illustrator, and proud volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

♦ ♦ ♦

L’équipe à la galerie a beaucoup travaillé pour s’assurer que les visites guidées sont programmées régulièrement tout au long de nos expositions, et ce dévouement a donné récemment naissance à une nouvelle série de visites ce mois-ci: des visites guidées multilingues! Pour la première fois, nos visites guidées sont maintenant offerts en mandarin et en espagnol!

Je suis fière d’avoir organisée nos visites guidées en français pour les dernières 3 expositions, succédant à l’artiste Patricia Huijnen après son retour en Suisse l’année dernière. Cela a été un réel plaisir pour moi, comme je suis amoureuse de la langue française et se plaignent souvent que je n’ai pas la chance de parler (ou d’écrire) en français autant que je le voudrais. J’aime aussi parler de l’art, et l’opportunité de le faire à la galerie d’art contemporain est à la fois stimulante et satisfaisante. L’art contemporain peut être difficile à comprendre au premier vu, et apportant le contexte, des nouvelles idées, et de nouvelles façons de penser à nos visiteurs est, pour moi, un privilège extrêmement enrichissante.

Kay Slater mène une visite guidée en français du travail de Nathan Coley.

Mon français est devenu assez rouiller après avoir pas eu la chance de l’utiliser quotidiennement, mais j’espère que mon passion pour l’art et pour la langue le compense.

Tommy Ting leads a guided tour in Mandarin at the CAG. 18 Mai, 2013Quand j’étais à l’école, c’était toujours difficile d’apprécier des excursions beaux-arts lorsque les expositions n’ont pas été présentées dans la langue dans laquelle nous étions instruits. Nos enseignants seraient diligents en nous fournir le vocabulaire et des outils pour s’engager avec l’art, mais quand il était temps de visiter une galerie, une musée ou un événement, il était souvent choquant à entendre des visites guidées en anglais. Il y avait quelque chose de vraiment spécial dans les visites qui ont été offerts en français; c’était peut-être simplement parce qu’ils étaient si rares, mais peut-être c’était également comment facile c’était à comprendre et à apprécier ces œuvres.

Quand Shaun Dacey, notre nouveau curateur de l’apprentissage et des programmes publiques, a rejoint l’équipe CAG en Avril, je lui ai écrit pour lui dire combien j’adore travailler en français au CAG. Imaginez ma joie, quand il a non seulement fait écho à mon enthousiasme, mais m’a informé qu’il travaillait déjà à ajouter d’autres visites en plusieurs langues à l’horaire.

J’ai participé à la première visite guidée en mandarine, organisée par l’artiste Tommy Ting, et j’ai été ravi de voir l’engagement dans les visages de nos visiteurs pendant qu’ils ont eu la chance de discuter et de s’engager avec le travail dans leur propre langue. Tandis que je n’ai pas pu participer à la visite guidée en espagnol la semaine suivante, organisée par le photographe Avelina Crespo, on m’a dit qu’il a été bien fréquenté et tout aussi bien accueilli. Tommy et Avelina ont accepté de nous rejoindre cet été pour présenter à nouveau des visites en mandarin et en espagnol à propos de notre prochaine exposition.

Je suis vraiment fière de faire partie de l’équipe offrant des visites multilingues à la CAG. Je vous invite à me rejoindre le 1er Juin à 15 heures pour ma visite guidée, en français, de l’exposition Nancy Holt / Erin Shirreff présentement exposée au CAG.

 

Kay Slater (@ kdot) est une illustratrice de Vancouver, et bénévole à la Galerie d’Art Contemporain. Venez la rendre visite tous les dimanches de midi à 15 heures.

MORE

New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées


Last Saturday was Vancouver Draw Down. The event took place in multiple locations all over town and it was great day. I hope you had a chance to get out and participate in some of the stations set up around the city. I managed to take in 6 of the 18 locations and one of my stops was naturally the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Artist and Educator, Landon Mackenzie, transformed the gallery’s street front, foyer & hallways into a “Map Room.” Based on her work, Landon invited everyone to explore the “many potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being.”

The place was packed when I arrived. Every table was covered with works in progress as visitors created collages from pieces of topographical print-outs.

When visitors were done they were invited to sketch the Monahan pieces in the BC Binning Gallery, examining form and mark making.

This was the 3rd year for Vancouver Draw Down and I can’t wait for the next. The event celebrated drawing and invited everyone to participate by simply making a mark. As the Vancouver Draw Down site says “If you can write your name, you can draw!”

I saw another great quote posted by Opus Art Supplies encouraging people to dispell their preconceptions: “If you hear a voice within you say – you cannot paint, then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced.” van Gogh

The same goes with drawing!

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

MORE

Vancouver Draw Down: the Map Room.


The days are getting shorter, the nights are getting colder, the meals heartier, and the urge to stay in bed more persistent. Luckily there’s a great reason to get dolled up and hit the town! The CAG Annual Gala Dinner and Art Auction is less than a week away, and what better way to spend an otherwise dull November Saturday than supporting the Contemporary Art Gallery and the artists they exhibit!

The date is November 5th, and the festivities begin at 6:30pm at the new Hotel Georgia.
Tickets are still available, $250 ($225 for members), $2250 for a table of ten.

You can check out the great artworks here.

Happy bidding!

MORE

So close you can almost touch it!


Our 22nd Annual Auction on Saturday was a tremendous success, and a fun night. Thank you to all the participating artists, our hardworking volunteers and to our sponsors that helped make it all happen.

For those of you that weren’t able to attend the auction in person, here is a sample of a performance that Paul Daykin treated us to live.

Video: Matt Smith

MORE

Auction sketching


The excitement is building at the CAG this afternoon as something special has just landed on our desks…

As some of you maybe aware Vancouver artist Elizabeth Zvonar has been commissioned to create the special gift for this year’s auction and the first batch has just arrived.

Here’s a sneak peak, but of course we can’t show you everything!  To see what’s inside you will have to wait till the night, so if you haven’t bought or reserved your tickets, now is the time!

Invest your inner ‘feelings’ at the 22ndAnnual Art Auction and Gala Dinner,

Sat Nov 6 at The Vancouver Club.

find out more here

MORE

A Call To Auction


$250.00

Published:
pages

TO PURCHASE OR RESERVE A TABLE OF TEN: PLEASE CALL 604 681 2700.

26th Annual Gala & Art Auction
Saturday November 8, 2014 - 6.30pm
Rosewood Hotel Georgia
801 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Join us at this important benefit event for the Contemporary Art Gallery. Your support allows us to continue our crucial role as the only free independent public art gallery dedicated exclusively to engaging audiences with the very best in contemporary art from Vancouver, Canada and abroad.

----------

No tickets are printed. Names will be on a list at the door. During check out please note any dietary preferences.

Absentee bids will be accepted for those who cannot attend.
For absentee bids and questions please contact Lisa Fedorak at auction@contemporaryartgallery.ca or 604-681-2700.

MORE

Gala & Art Auction - One Ticket


$2.250.00

Published:
pages

TO PURCHASE OR RESERVE A TABLE OF TEN: PLEASE CALL 604 681 2700.

Tickets are $250 each.
Table of ten $2250. 

26th Annual Gala & Art Auction
Saturday November 8, 2014 - 6.30pm
Rosewood Hotel Georgia
801 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Join us at this important benefit event for the Contemporary Art Gallery. Your support allows us to continue our crucial role as the only free independent public art gallery dedicated exclusively to engaging audiences with the very best in contemporary art from Vancouver, Canada and abroad.

----------

No tickets are printed. Names will be on a list at the door. During check out please make note of any dietary preferences and the names of your guests.
Your charitable tax receipt will be mailed to you after the event.

Absentee bids will be accepted for those who cannot attend.
For absentee bids and questions please contact Lisa Fedorak at auction@contemporaryartgallery.ca or 604-681-2700.

MORE

Gala & Art Auction - One Table


Icon

Visit CAG

555 Nelson Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada V6B 6R5

T 00 1 604 681 2700
F 00 1 604 683 2710

Gallery Hours
Tues – Sun 12 – 6 pm



  • Closed on British Columbia statutory holidays
  • The galleries are wheelchair accessible
  • The Gallery is free of charge
  • Suggested donation of $5


Reference Library



Icon

Join/Give


Become a Member


The CAG is a not-for-profit reliant on member support. As a Member of the CAG, you are supporting contemporary art now and playing a role in its future.

Make a Donation


Help support the only free public art gallery in Vancouver.
Donate Now

Exhibition
Archive

01-14

top