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Amaara Raheem
May 16 to June 8, 2016

In partnership with Access Gallery and Burrard Arts Foundation’s Twenty-three Days at Sea, CAG hosts artist Amaara Raheem at the Burrard Marina Field House for a one month production period.

Twenty-three Days at Sea offers a unique residency aboard a cargo ship sailing from Vancouver to Shanghai. Raheem, Sri Lankan born, and now based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, is an in(ter)dependent dance artist. Feeding off her own experience of in-betweenness, Raheem’s practice investigates the aesthetics and ethics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. Currently a PhD Candidate in the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University, Raheem is ultimately interested in questioning the coherence of systems that humans create to “know” the world around them, creating arrangements that offer uncertainty, play and new possibilities.

Following the residency, Raheem will feature in the group exhibition Twenty-three Days at Sea, Chapter One: Nour Bishouty, Christopher Boyne, Elisa Ferrari and Amaara Raheem which opens at Access Gallery on May 27, 2016.

In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
With performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7:00 PM
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is ‘Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s’ fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, the Contemporary Art Gallery will host her at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio to process the experience and produce her work for the exhibition, which opens May 27, 2016.

At this event, held in her temporary place of residence at the CAG Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, and Raheem will perform a new work in response to her time at sea. More information to follow at accessgallery.ca.
Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects, and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and the Contemporary Art Gallery. Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. Access is grateful for the ongoing support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the British Columbia government through the BC Arts Council and BC Gaming, the City of Vancouver, and our donors, members, and volunteers.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Amaara Raheem


Telus Garden Building
Fourth Floor, 510 West Georgia St.
Open Monday to Friday, 8am – 4pm

Commissioned by TELUS, Re-Visions is a new permanent, site-specific five-channel media installation developed by eight local emerging artists facilitated by the CAG and Cineworks. Mentored by Jem Noble, Brian Lye and Josh Hite, Re-Visions seeks to produce new representations of place through the group’s diverse responses to our city in motion. The installation engages with themes of temporal and spatial transformation, the landscape of Vancouver portrayed through constant, yet fluctuating changes in infrastructure, community and communications. Playing with the idea of a contemporary “city symphony” — an experimental documentary genre that mimics city rhythms in an attempt to create a portrait of everyday city life — the installation turns to repetition and abstraction, rather than literal representation.

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Off-site: Re-Visions - Telus Garden Building


Patrick Staff
The Foundation
February 12 to April 24, 2016
Alvin Balkind Gallery and off-site

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents The Foundation, a new and expansive body of work by artist Patrick Staff, their first solo exhibition in Canada. The project, which centres around a major film installation but also comprises sculpture, print, and text, explores queer intergenerational relationships as they are negotiated through a body of historical materials. The film combines footage shot at the Tom of Finland Foundation in Los Angeles—home to the archive of the erotic artist and gay icon and a community of people that care for it—with choreographic sequences shot within a specially constructed set.

The legacy of Finnish artist Touko Laaksonen (1920-1991), better known as Tom of Finland, spans multiple generations; his work made a considerable impact on masculine representation and imagery in post-war gay culture. The foundation was established in 1984 by Tom and his friend Durk Dehner to preserve his vast catalogue of homoerotic art, whilst endeavouring to – to quote the organization’s website – ‘educate the public to the cultural merits of erotic art and in promoting healthier, more tolerant attitudes about sexuality.’ Today, Durk runs the organization and lives in the house, along with a handful of other employees and artists.

Rather than focusing on Tom of Finland’s work, Staff’s film evokes the foundation as a set of relations. It explores how a collection is formed and constituted and the communities that produce and are produced by a body of work. Through observational footage of the house, its collections and inhabitants, the foundation is revealed as a domestic environment, a libidinal space, an archive, an office and a community centre; a private space which is also the home of a public-facing organization and the source of a widely dispersed body of images. In the work, Staff foregrounds their own identity and personal dialogue with the different communities of the foundation to consider how ideas of inheritance and exchange are complicated by gender identity and presentation; in this context, of a younger trans person within a context dominated by the overtly masculine, male identity of an older generation. The documentary style footage of the foundation is intercut with a series of scenes, which are shot in a set incorporating aspects of the building’s architecture and technologies and operate within the register of experimental theatre. These sequences, featuring interactions with an older actor, use choreography and prop to explore the body as a site for the construction and deconstruction of subjectivities.

Through a varied, interdisciplinary and often collaborative body of  work comprising film, dance and performance, Staff considers ideas of discipline, dissent, labour and the queer body, frequently drawing on the historical narration of counter-culture, radical activity and alternative forms of community building. This new work is the product of several years’ research and dialogue with the Tom of Finland Foundation and is Staff’s most ambitious and large-scale project to date, bringing together languages of film and live performance with sculptural materiality to explore the body as a political, living archive. The Foundation explores the complexities of cultural artifacts and collective identities, via an examination of ownership, appropriation, responsibility and desire.

For Vancouver CAG has developed a new broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities. The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Paige Sarlin and Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide, in Vancouver, as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

The Foundation is co-commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London; Spike Island, Bristol; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; and Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. Co-produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London and Spike Island, Bristol.

With thanks to the Tom of Finland Foundation.
The Foundation is supported by Arts Council England Grants for the Arts, The Elephant Trust and the Genesis Prize.
The broadsheet publication and screening project is supported by The British Council.

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Patrick Staff - The Foundation


Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7pm
Off-site: Pyatt Hall at VSO School of Music, Vancouver

Ticket available at: www.picatic.com/CAGglass

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a new performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Camille Norment in collaboration with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

Norment performs with a glass armonica, a legendary eighteenth century instrument that creates ethereal music from glass and water. Combined with EMU’s reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making, Norment and EMU will develop a work that resonates with local history.

Songs for Glass Island will use US visual artist Robert Smithson’s failed 1969 proposal for the Strait of Georgia, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass) as point of departure. Granted permission by the Canadian Government, Smithson planned encrusting Miami Islet west of Fraser Point in 100 tons of broken glass. However, as public pressure against the idea mounted from environmentalists and anti-Americanists, it was suspended by a governmental telegram. Aside from drawings, letters, and plans, the only physical artifacts which remain are studies which Smithson called “maps.” What would have been Smithson’s first “permanent” earthwork morphed via the idea’s failure into the famous Spiral Jetty made the following year.

Throughout March and April, Norment will be in residence at the University of Victoria where she will be writing and rehearsing with EMU members. Using glass in various forms as their primary instruments, they will prepare a set of inter-related works including newly developed instrumentation, that imagine the possible sounds, stories, textures and ecologies of Smithson’s fabled island. Reflecting the themes in structure and content, sound will weave viscerally through this glass world, the project residing in realistic and fantasy scenarios provoked by Smithson’s proposal: glass as a material; glass in acoustic and marine ecology; inevitable mounds of post-catastrophe glass shards; and metaphors associated with glass, such as glass ceilings, broken barriers, reflection, transparency and invisibility.

Through the creative process, the juxtaposition of the practices of sound and experimental music performance in glass will create a visually stunning and sonically captivating audiovisual concert-length program that will debut in progress at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and be followed by its premiere performance in Vancouver presented by CAG at Pyatt Hall. Recordings of these works and performances will be subject to a subsequent audio publication.
CAG will also partner later this year with Norment and the Montreal Biennale.

Camille Norment is a multidisciplinary American artist living in Oslo, Norway. Her work has been the subject of numerous international exhibitions and performances including the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2013) and a commissioned artwork and performance for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2012). In 2015 she presented Rapture, a site-specific, sculptural and sonic installation in the Nordic Pavilion for the Venice Biennale. She regularly performs and records with the Camille Norment Trio in which she plays the glass armonica.

EMU is a sound ensemble of LaSaM Music from Victoria, British Columbia featuring performer/composers Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, Paul Walde and producer Kirk McNally. During the past four years EMU has developed a reputation for sonic investigations of relationships between the natural world, sound and music, and between notation, improvisation and attention states in music making.

Songs for Glass Island is presented in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Camille Norment and Experimental Music Unit - Songs for Glass Island


Hazel Meyer
Muscle Panic
Sunday, January 31, 2016; 2pm
B.C. Binning Gallery

Hazel Meyer’s projects explore seemingly disparate yet overlapping preoccupations — intestines and athletics, feminism and the absurd, anxiety and textiles — using scale, language, repetition, gentle confrontation and ecstatic immersion. Recent projects include solo exhibitions at MacLaren Art Centre, Barrie and Art Metropole, Toronto; group exhibitions at Doris McCarthy Gallery, Scarborough and Trifecta Gallery, Las Vegas; publications with Little Joe (UK) and Idea Exchange, Cambridge and residencies at Embassy of Foreign Artists, Geneva and Scrap Metal Gallery, Toronto.

Hazel Meyer’s mutable body of work, Muscle Panic, considers the performance of the athletic. Evoking the imagery of momentous sports history, the bodily gestures and actions of a drill or warmup and the aesthetics of the gymnasium, Meyer instigates an arena of sweat and queer desire. Multiple iterations of Muscle Panic have taken the project from a rogue basketball gym built in an abandoned barn to a clandestine locker room to a warehouse-like gymnastics studio. Simultaneously an installation and a performance, Muscle Panic transforms the banal and austere white cube into a hot physically charged site for emotional and physical exchange. For CAG, Meyer has developed an installation of imagery and objects evoking the potentially queer sensibilities of the athletic. The installation will become the set for an afternoon event in which performers animate the set through a series of drills exploring endurance as gendered phenomena within sport.

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Hazel Meyer - Muscle Panic


Margaret Dragu
The Library Project: Interdisciplinarity as the Catalyst of Knowledge

Saturday, January 30, 2016; 11am–2pm
B.C. Binning Gallery and Reading Room

The Library Project is an ongoing series of participatory events exploring the body as a source and site of knowledge. Interrogating the strategies of contemporary academic and corporate forms of group knowledge exchange and skill building such as the TED Talk, conference, workshop and lecture, each performance playfully explores personal history, archive and pedagogy. Inspired by the Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate, Malala Yousafzai’s

call to action at the UN, “Let us pick up our books and our pens. They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the only solution.” The Library Project seeks to develop a space and platform for knowledge sharing through performative acts. For CAG, Dragu will host a daytime intensive workshop considering the idea of trans-interdisciplinarity. Alongside this in our reading room we present the video archive of the five previous iterations at the Bickersteth Library, Hart House, University of Toronto; Richmond Public Library; Kamloops Art Gallery; Your Kontinent: Richmond International Film & Media Arts Festival and Month of Performance Art, Berlin.

Margaret Dragu works in video, installation, web-based/book-publication and performance. Spanning relational, durational, interventionist and community-based practices, her performances have been presented in galleries, museums, theatres, nightclubs, libraries, universities and sitespecific venues including parks, botanical

gardens, and public parade routes across Canada, the United States and Europe. An innovator and pioneer in Canadian art, Dragu was the recipient of the Governor General’s Award for Visual and Media Arts in 2012.

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Margaret Dragu - The Library Project: Interdisciplinarity as the Catalyst of Knowledge


*PLEASE NOTE: DOUG will be performed for one night only; on Friday Jan 29. Doors open at 6pm.

Janice Kerbel
DOUG
Friday, January 29, 2016; 7pm
B.C. Binning Gallery

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the North American premiere of Janice Kerbel’s Turner Prize nominated DOUG, a musical composition and performance.

Employing recognizable conventions from a variety of disciplines — from theatre to sport to music — Kerbel’s practice utilizes existing structures while challenging expectations and traditional use. Events normally considered impossible to depict are given form that is both surprising and strangely familiar.

Commissioned by The Common Guild, Glasgow and first presented at the Mitchell Library in 2014, an ensemble of six vocalists leads the audience through a nine song cycle of imagined disasters, translating “accident” into musical form. Reflecting the acts themselves, some pieces are violently

short, others unfold at length. Voice and the structures inherent in music are used to give shape to these visceral moments, while Kerbel’s lyrics take the form of a series of rhythmic verse outlining a sequence of events going from bad to worse with titles such as Blast, Fall, Hit, Crash and Slip.

The performance is presented with musica intima and supported by Vancouver New Music. Text by Janice Kerbel. Composition by Janice Kerbel in collaboration with Laurie Bamon and Philip Venables. DOUG was initially conceived as an online project for Film and Video Umbrella.

Janice Kerbel lives and works in London, has exhibited internationally since the late 1990s and participated in numerous group exhibitions and biennales. Recent projects include The Turner Prize, Tramway, Glasgow; Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver (2015); DOUG, Common Guild, Glasgow (2014); Kill the Workers, Chisenhale, London; Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe and Walter Phillips Gallery, The Banff Centre (2011); See it Now, Art Now, Tate Britain (2010); Remarkable, commissioned for Frieze Projects (2007); and Nick Silver Can’t Sleep, commissioned by Artangel/BBC Radio 3 (2006) and presented live at Art Now Live, Tate Britain (2007). Kerbel is represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver, greengrassi, London; Galerie Karin Guenther, Hamburg; and i8, Reykjavik.

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Janice Kerbel - DOUG


The Contemporary Art Gallery is delighted to host this year’s RBC Canadian Painting Competition which since , with the support of the Canadian Art Foundation, has been a unique initiative, helping bridge the gap from emerging to established artists.

The jury panel consists of: Hugues Charbonneau — Director, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal; Melanie Colosimo — Director, Anna Leonowens Gallery, NSCAD University, Halifax; John Zeppetelli — Director and Chief Curator, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montréal; Iga Janik — Curator, Cambridge Galleries, Cambridge; Georgiana Uhlyarik — Associate Curator, Canadian Art, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Jinny Yu — artist and Associate Professor, Department of Visual Arts, University of Ottawa, Ottawa; Eli Bornowsky — artist, RBC Canadian Painting Competition Finalist Alumni (2007, 2008, 2010), Vancouver; Garry Neil Kennedy — Senior Artist, Vancouver; and Lisa Kehler — Director, Lisa Kehler Art + Projects, Winnipeg.

The exhibition will be closed on November 16, 17, 18 and 19. The winners will be announced at the
CAG on November 18.

For more information, visit www.rbc.com/paintingcompetition

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RBC Canadian Painting Competition


Marie Lorenz – Tidal Dérive
September 1 to 7, 2015 

Fraser River: Hope to Richmond, September 1 to 3 
Salt Spring Island to Isle-de-Lis/Rum Island, September 5 to 7

Schedule may change depending upon water and weather conditions. Click here for a map and itinerary of the journey. www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/blog/map

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes New York-based artist Marie Lorenz back to Vancouver. Join Lorenz on a week-long journey down the Fraser River and around the South Gulf Islands using the tides and currents as a guide.

In 2014, Marie Lorenz participated in a CAG residency at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio which included the construction and launch of a boat created from salvaged wood found around Vancouver and the lower mainland coast line. Driftboat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed tidal dérives in San Francisco and most recently along the Russian River, Guerneville, California. From September 1 to 7, Tidal Dérive will unfold as an ambitious multi-day trip along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands. Along the route Lorenz will invite participants to boat with her.

Studying tidal charts of the area, Lorenz uses tides and currents to direct the journey. This simple act offers the unique and unfamiliar experience of viewing river banks, harbours, industrialized landscapes and cities from the water. The experience and movement of floating, powered by natural forces, allows for keen observations and further exploration. As Lorenz describes:

“I believe that the act of floating has an impact on observation. The viewer maintains an awareness of their balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. My boat projects are an attempt to un-know the metropolis by continually exploring it”
Launching from Hope, BC on September 1 and arriving in Richmond on September 3, the voyage uses tidal currents and historic canoe routes. Participants will join Lorenz on this exploratory journey camping overnight in river-side towns and regional parks, navigating the currents while continuing on from Salt Spring Island on September 5, travelling to Portland Island and Isle-de-Lis, returning September 7.

We are reaching out to canoers and kayakers interested in accompanying artist Marie Lorenz on the week-long journey: Tidal Dérive. To RSVP or for further information contact: learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca or call us directly at 604 681 2700.

We acknowledge the generous support of the U.S. Consulate General Vancouver.

BIO: Marie Lorenz was born in Twentynine Palms, California and grew up traveling with her military family. Lorenz has received grants from Artists Space, the Harpo Foundation and the Alice Kimball English Travel Fellowship. In 2008 she was awarded the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize for the American Academy in Rome. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including High Desert Test Sites in Joshua Tree, CA, to MoMA PS1, in New York City. She has completed solo projects at Jack Hanley Gallery in New York; Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK and Artpace in San Antonio, Texas. Her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi (www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org) is an exploration of the coastline in New York City.
Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City and other cities in North America in boats that she designs and builds; her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted material forms explores the intertidal zone. Read more on her ongoing project ‘The Tide and Current Taxi’, www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org. For more information on artist Marie Lorenz go to www.marielorenz.com.

Public events:
Launch event in Hope, BC Time: 9am Place: ‘Put in’ at Wardle Street and 7th Avenue.

Talks and Tours: Our Working Waterfront/Tidal Dérive Thursday, September 3, 5-7pm, free
Our Working Waterfront Guided Tour with Curator, Oana Capota – 5pm New Westminster Museums & Archives 777 Columbia Street, New Westminster
Tidal Dérive Artist Talk with artist Marie Lorenz – 6pm Samson V Maritime Museum 880 Quayside Drive, New Westminster Join an evening of exploring the Fraser River through two unique public programs: A tour of Our Working Waterfront, 1945-2015 at the New Westminster Museum and Archives led by Curator, Oana Capota (5-6pm) followed by an artist talk and public conversation with artist Marie Lorenz (6-7pm). Lorenz Tidal Dérive is a multi-day float along the Fraser River and Southern Gulf Islands in a boat Lorenz made from driftwood found along Vancouver’s shoreline. Lorenz’ The vessel will be on display.

About the Burrard Marina Field House Residency Program: Burrard Marina Field House Studio: 1655 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver. (Located below the Burrard Bridge, near Vanier Park) The Field House Studio is an artist residency space and community hub organized by the CAG. Since 2013 the CAG has hosted several national and international artists including: Raymond Boisjoly, artist collective- Broken City Lab, Brendan Fernandes, Marie Lorenz, Harrell Fletcher, Sameer Farooq & Mirjam Linschooten, Maddie Leach, Keg de Souza and Walter Scott. Read more about the artist-in-residency projects here: http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/blog-category/field-house-studio/ The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of many private and individual donors toward this program. For more details about the Field House Studio Program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and follow the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.wordpress.com

Tidal Dérive
Itinerary – September 1 – 7, 2015
HOPE, BC: September 1st; Put in @ 9:00am, arrive earlier to prepare
Boat Launch at corner of Wardle St. and 7th Ave. in Hope, BC
Travel: 9:00am – 2:00pm
Stop: Fraser River Ecological Reserve
Camp: Kirby Historic Site (near Harrison Mills)
KIRBY SITE: September 2nd; Launch @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop/Camp: Derby Reach Regional Park
DERBY REACH: September 3rd; Launch @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop: Arrive at New Westminster mid-morning
Continue: to coast final point will be determined by tidal flow
September 4: Commute to Salt Spring Island via Ferry.
SALT SPRING ISLAND: September 5th; Put in at Fulford Harbour @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Shell Beach Campsite, Portland Island
PORTLAND ISLAND: September 6th; Launch @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Isle de Lis (Rum Island) (only 3 self-service sites)
ISLE-De-LIS/RUM ISLAND: September 7th; Launch @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 4:00pm
Return to: Salt Spring Island

Further information on the project:

Over the past two years Marie Lorenz has participated in a sequence of residencies at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House resulting in the development of a new Pacific-based series of projects centred on the launch of a handmade boat constructed from driftwood found along Vancouver’s coast line. The boat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed “tidal derives” in San Francisco with Southern Exposure and most recently along the Russian River with Look Up Gallery in Guerneville, California.

In September the project will culminate in a multi-day dérive with the boat along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands, Lorenz inviting participants to join her along the route. Studying tidal charts of the area, the artist uses tides and currents to direct and drift the navigation of ocean and rivers. This simple act of journeying along the contemporary ecosystem and industrialized commercial port of Fraser offers a different and unfamiliar experience of space for city residents who travel over these bodies of water daily. The experience of floating, of movement controlled by natural forces, adds a specific dimension to one’s own observation: the viewer made aware of their own balance and form as they absorb the details of their surroundings, creating something new from something familiar. The journey will be live-streamed via (website) for the land-bound audience to follow, providing a mediated representation of the visceral experience of the expedition.

Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City in boats that she designs and builds, her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted, material forms that explore the intertidal zone. She envisions a city harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore; reorganizing things that we value and representing things that were thrown away. The tide examines the nature of each object with its own incomprehensible order; Lorenz’s driftwood boat a way to gather and record evidence in collaboration with the tide.

————–

The CAG was delighted to welcome back New York-based artist Marie Lorenz to the Burrard Marina Field House as artist-in-residence during May-June 2014.

For this residency, Lorenz is fabricating a new vessel – a handmade boat – from driftwood found along the coastline of the lower mainland and the City of Vancouver. Lorenz first visited Vancouver in December 2013 to begin research for the residency and she has returned again this month to construct and launch of her exciting site-specific project Driftboat.

Lorenz’ artistic practice explores the intertidal zone of cities. She envisions a harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore. By building and launching a driftwood boat Lorenz is gathering, recording and collaborating with the natural ebb and flow of the environment. Floating out into False Creek and English Bay in the ‘driftboat’ begins a new kind of dialogue, working to reveal the tidal harbour of Vancouver.

As part of her residency, and in participation with the Vancouver Maritime Museum, on Thursday, May 29, Lorenz was in conversation with Vancouver artists Rebecca Bayer and Josh Hite talking about beachcombing, along with local sailor and writer, R. Bruce Macdonald and treasure hunter, Phil Macska. The following Sunday, June 1, Lorenz, Bayer and Hite complemented their talk by hosting two beachcombing workshops with R. Bruce Macdonald and Phil Macska.

Driftboat was constructed then launched in early June with participatory special events, finally travelling down the west coast, to San Francisco to be presented in the exhibition Off Shore at Southern Exposure later this summer.

For this residency we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.

Marie Lorenz – 2013 visit and 2014 project

In  December 2013, Marie Lorenz visited Vancouver to begin research for a project completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Marie Lorenz: Tidal Dérive


Throughout spring and summer 2015 the CAG hosted a series of artists-in-residences, each continued research toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2015–2016. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program were an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Australian artist de Souza investigates the politics of space informed through a formal training in architecture combined with her experiences such as squatting in Redfern, Sydney. De Souza’s work emphasises participation and reciprocity, and often involves the process of learning new skills and fostering relationships to create site and situation-specific projects. For over ten years she has self-published her hand-bound books and ‘zines under the name All Thumbs Press.

In Vancouver, De Souza is developing a series of community based workshops throughout 2015-16 engaging participants in a critical dialogue regarding local food production. De Souza is working closely with various local urban farmers, food security activists and community members to explore the food politics within the city as both evidence of and a metaphor for urban displacement through gentrification.

In 2013, de Souza developed projects for the 5th Auckland Triennial, 15th Jakarta Biennale and the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. More recently, at the Delfina Foundation, London, she hosted a series of picnics held inside an inflatable tent installation designed to fit within the gallery space. Notionally “traditional” English food such as cucumber sandwiches, Cornish pasties and Ploughman’s Lunches were made linking to specific cultural histories as a way to discuss class, privilege, space and colonialism. As picnickers ate and spoke, de Souza mapped the discussion on the floor creating a giant cartography of the conversation. Also in 2014 she completed a residency with KUNCI Cultural Studies Center in Yogyakarta, Indonesia working closely with community organizers and residents of Kampung Ratmakan to create an inflatable ghost house and a film featuring drawings by local children made during a ghost story workshop. Their local government had announced a major development plan affecting the Ratmakan area and the squatters residing there started to be displaced. The area is built on a graveyard so ghosts are constantly appearing to the residents, ongoing exorcisms by the local ghost expert, paralleling their own evictions in the living world.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Keg de Souza


Throughout spring 2015 the CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each continuing research toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2015–2016. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Harrell Fletcher
March 2015

Fletcher will develop research rooted in his recent walking projects toward a new piece for Vancouver. In 2013, at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, he developed a four day walk with a group of museum staff, scientists and members of the public. Over forty miles, from the museum across the Bay to Emeryville and the top of Mt Diablo, each participant presented topics related to the areas they were travelling through. Each day featured several official stops while countless unofficial observations added to the experience, additional members of the public connected with the core group at more than a dozen points along the path. By extending the museum’s curiositybased learning into the surrounding landscape, the project aimed to transform the everyday world into an open classroom, working toward a greater integration of the cultural institution within its surrounding community.

Fletcher has produced a variety of socially engaged collaborative and interdisciplinary projects since the early 1990s. His work has been shown at SFMoMA, de Young Museum, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, Yerba Buena Center, all in San Francisco; Berkeley Art Museum; The Drawing Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, and The Sculpture Center, all in New York; PICA, Portland; The Seattle Art Museum; Signal, Malmö, Sweden; Domain de Kerguehennec, France; Tate Modern, London and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. His work was included in the 2004 Whitney Biennial and was the 2005 recipient of the Alpert Award in Visual Arts. From 2002 to 2009 Fletcher co-produced Learning To Love You More, a participatory website with Miranda July. His 2005 exhibition The American War originated at ArtPace in San Antonio, travelling to Solvent Space, Richmond, VA; White Columns, NYC; The Center For Advanced Visual Studies, MIT, Boston; PICA, Portland and LAXART, Los Angeles among other locations. Fletcher is an Associate Professor of Art and Social Practice at Portland State University, Oregon.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Harrell Fletcher


Throughout spring and summer 2015 the CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each continuing research toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2015–2016. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

The interdisciplinary practice of Farooq and Linschooten aims to create community-based models of participation in order to reimagine a material record of the present. They investigate tactics of representation — the ideas and values of organizations, claims about what a cultural group is and ought to be, protocols of approaching an object and images of who the intended viewer is — and use installation, photography, documentary filmmaking, writing and the methods of anthropology to examine various forms of collecting, interpreting and display. The result is work that counterbalances how institutions speak about our lives, producing counter-archives; new additions to collections or buried history made visible. Related to these questions Farooq and Linschooten will begin development towards a Vancouver-specific public project engaging the ways Vancouver frames its multiculturalism via ethnographic museum display.

Farooq and Linschooten have exhibited in various countries including Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey. Recent projects include Faux Guide, Trankat, Morocco; The Museum of Found Objects Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario; The Museum of Found Objects Istanbul, Turkish Ministry of Culture; Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue, Artellewa, Egypt. Most recently the duo completed a residency and exhibition at Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga, Ontario which explores the complex space of social codes, ideological agendas and decisions, both conscious and unconscious, of museum display.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Sameer Farooq and Mirjam Linschooten


Walter Scott
July 1 to 31, 2015

Scott is an artist from Kahnawake whose work is based in writing and illustration and is known for his ongoing comic book series, Wendy, which follows the fictional narrative of a young woman living in an urban centre, whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed by her fears and desires. In July, Scott will begin research towards a new Vancouver-specific commission exploring collaborative performance and script writing. He will also be leading workshops with the Native Youth Program at the Museum of Anthropology. Scott will also be working along side artist Keg de Souza on the summer youth program EXCHANGE.

Scott currently lives and works between Toronto and Montréal. For the Images Festival 2015, Scott produced Wendy Live! where a cast of English, Japanese and Mohawk-speaking performers enacted the newest Wendy book before its 2016 North American English-language release. Alongside his comic work, Scott produces work involving printmaking and sculpture and is represented by Macaulay & Co. Fine Art, Vancouver. He recently completed a residency at the Koganecho Bazaar, Yokohama, Japan.

 

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Burrard Marina Field House - Walter Scott


Maddie Leach
June to July, 2015

Taking up residency earlier this year in June, Maddie Leach began research towards a Vancouver-based project. Leach’s practice is one that seeks ways of making artworks as a means to interpret and respond to specific context, through a lengthy process of enquiry and social interaction establishing relationships between form, materials, locations, histories, events, individuals and communities.

Leach was nominated for the Walters Prize 2014 for If you find the good oil let us know (2012–›2014), created during a two year residency at Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, a town known for its oil and gas exploration on New Zealand’s North Island. The project centered on 70 ‚litres of supposed ‘whale oil’. With layered and complex associations to whaling from indigenous sustenance to colonial/capitalist industry, whale oil speaks to New Zealand’s past and evokes its new economic boom in crude oil exploration. Leach sought to return this mythic substance to the sea, beginning a tangential journey that ended with a cube of cement made from the firing of 70 litres of mineral oil relocated to the seabed several kilometres off the coast. Through such ephemeral aesthetic actions and an unfolding public dialogue, this search for the authenticity of the ‘whale oil’ connected fragmented industrial and cultural narratives central to the context of New Zealand. Sharing her unfolding research, Leach then invited fourteen individuals to offer written letters as responses to the work, the only stipulation being to begin the letter with ‘Dear.’ The texts became a series of ‘Letters to the Editor’ in the Taranaki Daily News developing a curious narrative composed by multiple authors, from scientists to sailors, cement workers to oil-industry executives.

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Burrard Marina Field House - Maddie Leach


Julia Dault
Blame It On the Rain
May 1 to June 28, 2015
BC Binning and Alvin Balkind Galleries

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a major solo exhibition by Toronto-born, New York–based artist Julia Dault. Through a selection of new and recent works, the exhibition reveals the importance to Dault of balancing spontaneous gesture with responsiveness to rules, logic and the constraints of materials. Physical negotiations are central to Dault’s textured paintings and improvised sculptures; both are exhibited in Blame It On the Rain.

Dault is interested in ‘embodied knowledge’ — how making is thinking — and reinserts the artist’s hand into a minimal aesthetic primarily interpreted as distanced and industrial. The artist’s rule-based painting involves responding to mass-produced elements — patterned silks, pleather, unmixed paint straight from the tube — with unconventional tools, such as squeegees, rubber combs and sea sponges. The limitations of these objects create quasi-standardized gestures that allow Dault to skirt the line between expressive abstraction and cool, machine-like facture. Erasure of her paintings’ topmost layers, which allows viewers to ‘see into’ the painting process, is as important to Dault as paint application.

Exploration of artistic labor recurs in Dault’s sculptures. Always improvising on site and working alone, the artist manipulates and coerces Plexiglas, Formica and other industrially produced materials into imposing curved forms, then affixes them to the gallery wall using straps and cords. Dault’s efforts can be understood as ‘private performances’ in which her physical capabilities are juxtaposed with the properties of the materials she employs. Each sculpture is titled with a time stamp that reflects the duration it took to complete the piece. In this gesture, as with her paintings, she hopes to underline the durational nature of the art-making process.

Dault’s work fuses the emphasis on process found in both Abstract Expressionist painting and post-Minimal sculpture. One unifying element is the artist’s fascination with patterns, and with the slippages and imperfections that reveal the human origins of what appears mechanical. Another is the search for variety within strict limitations. By devising expressive gestures through rules and reasoning indicative of post-Minimal and Conceptual art, Dault is part of a generation of artists acknowledging histories and legacies of art making while revitalizing abstraction today.

The exhibition complements Color Me Badd, presented at The Power Plant, Toronto in 2014-2015. The two institutions are working together on the first major monograph of Dault’s work, to be published by Black Dog Publishing later in 2015. The publication is made with generous support from the RBC Emerging Artist Project.

BIO
Julia Dault lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She has held solo exhibitions at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2015); The Power Plant, Toronto and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles (2014); Galerie Bob van Orsouw, Zurich and Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto (2013); and White Cube Bermondsey, London (2012). She has also participated in group shows which include: Elevated, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (2014-2015), Americana: Selections from the Collection, Pérez Art Museum, Miami (2013–2014); Outside the Lines, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (2013–2014); In the Heart of the Country, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Inner Journeys, Maison Particulière, Brussels (2013); The Ungovernables, New Museum, New York; Roundtable, the Ninth Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2012); and Making Is Thinking, Witte de With, Rotterdam (2011). Her work is in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; Saatchi Gallery, London; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.

Dault is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York; Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto; and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles.

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Julia Dault - Blame It On the Rain


Only a Free Individual Can Create a Free Society is a new film installation by German artist Grace Schwindt which revisits discussions she witnessed as a child surrounded by individuals in Frankfurt, Germany. The dialogue running through the film is from an interview that Schwindt conducted with a leftwing activist influenced by the 1960s and 1970s political landscape, shaped by the Frankfurt School, the Outer Parliamentary Opposition and the Baader Meinhof Gang.

Rather than aiming to gain a better understanding of the past, Schwindt attempts to take a system apart — to undo it. Nothing is assumed to be neutral and every movement, word, gesture or colour is understood to have cultural, social, political or economic implications. The artist constructs her own processes of translating language into vivid material, choreographing dancers, set, props, costume, lighting, sound, camera movement and words as elementary forms carrying symbolic power. Each element is equally important and should be read together as a melody where the words or functions of ‘chair’ or ‘terrorism’, ‘clothing’ or ‘freedom’ have equal status.

At feature film length Only a Free Individual Can Create a Free Society is the product of an extensive rehearsal period with eleven dancers and a dramaturge over a period of five weeks using diagrams to map out a detailed choreography. The film features highly coloured and geometric costumes using aluminium, cardboard, silk and velvet, as well as extensive post-production to create a narrative that questions how freedom was, and is, understood, who has access to it and what political and social structures need to be in place to create a free society. Alongside the installation the exhibition included a newly commissioned sculptural piece, redolent of images pictured in the film. Constructed from salt crystals, bronze and ceramic, it has a bodily suggestion, evoking a sense of place and subject through its shape, materiality and form.

Only a Free Individual Can Create a Free Society’ was commissioned by FLAMIN Productions through Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network, Eastside Projects, Birmingham; The Showroom, London; Badischer Kunstverein; Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; Site Gallery, Sheffield; Tramway, Glasgow; ICIA, University of Bath; and Zeno X Gallery. Supported by Arts Council England, Hessian Film Fund and The Jerwood Charitable Foundation.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

Grace Schwindt (born 1979, Germany) is an artist based in London working with film, live performance and sculpture. Her theatrical sets for film works use minimal architectural elements and props to mark a location, in which she places bodies including her own. Using a tightly scripted choreography in which every move relates to institutionalised systems she investigates how social relations and understandings about oneself are formed, often through acts of exclusion and destruction. The artist’s interviews with individuals often serve as a starting point for fictionalised dialogues delivered by performers. Represented by Zeno X Gallery in Antwerp, her work is distributed by Argos Centre for Media and Art. Recent solo presentations include South London Gallery; ICA, London; Whitechapel Gallery, London; Spill Festival, Basement, Brighton; Collective Gallery, Edinburgh and White Columns, New York. Schwindt was shortlisted for this year’s Jarman Film Award.

Running time: 80 min

Screening times: 12pm, 1.30pm, 3.00pm, 4.30pm daily during gallery opening hours

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Grace Schwindt - Only a Free Individual Can Create a Free Society


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Brendan Fernandes


The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes is a group exhibition of recent film and video that seeks to interrogate notions of uncertainty within the documentary format. Work by ten artists engages with the conventions of source footage, narrative voice and re-enactment, questioning perceptions of such devices, while also reclaiming them in order to redefine their intent and potential. Not all works critique these characteristics, but each examines the consumption of knowledge and truth, using the body as form and performance as a site, to address where meaning may reside.

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The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Broken City Lab


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Raymond Boisjoly


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first exhibition of work by Polish artist Monika Sosnowka in Canada. Best known for her ambitious architectural and sculptural installations which simultaneously embrace and resist the spaces they occupy,  Sosnowska’s exhibition obliquely references her hometown of Warsaw and the economic shift that has occurred since the collapse of communism in 1989 to the present day. Characteristically the artist’s sculptures recall familiar objects transformed in some way –  dysfunctional stairways that join one floor to the other but to no purpose or large-scale metal cubes and girder structures twisted and wedged into existing gallery spaces.

At the Contemporary Art Gallery we present a series of new painted steel sculptures, redolent of broken market vendor stands, referencing actual forms salvaged from Jarmark Europa Stadium, originally the site of a large market that sold everything from imitation Nike training shoes to pirated CDs and DVDs. The market opened with the onset of capitalism and ended last year when the stadium was destroyed to make way for a new national stadium that was built in time to host Euro 2012. Collectively these series of objects evoke a sense of architecture, yet through absence they poignantly suggest that as with all structures we inhabit or that give form to our daily routines, social space is subject to change over time.

This exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Lethbridge, which will exhibit the works from September 28 – November 24, 2013.

Sosnowska is represented by Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne; Hauser and Wirth, Zurich, London and New York; Kurimanzutto, Mexico City and The Modern Institute, Glasgow.

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Monika Sosnowska


What stories simmer just beneath the surface of the public spaces that we dwell in? What characters are the strangers we
brush shoulders with? What characters are we? Argentinean artist Mariano Pensotti’s ingeniously voyeuristic work Sometimes I think, I can see you places writers in public spaces and uses them as literary surveillance cameras. Over the three weekends of the 2013 PuSh Festival, a group of Vancouver writers including Michael Turner, Lisa C. Ravensbergen, Adrienne Wong, Kay Slater, Charles Demers, Anakana Schofield, OZ and Caitlin Chaisson, were stationed in the lobby of the Vancouver Art Gallery and the atrium of the Vancouver Public Library Central Branch equipped with laptops connected to projection screens. Their directive? To write a live account of whatever it is they saw — or imagine they saw — in these urban surroundings. Through the eyes and minds of these various writers, speculations unfolded, narratives were woven, and the anonymous individuals around us became implicated in a series of beautifully spontaneous fictions.

Mariano Pensotti is known internationally as one of the foremost directors in contemporary theatre. His work El pasado es un animal grotesco was presented on a revolving stage in the Fei and Milton Wong Experimental Theatre at PuSh, and his work La Marea presented outdoors in the streets of Gastown at PuSh 2011.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, The Playwrights Theatre Centre and Vancouver Art Gallery, and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

Produced with Ciudades Paralelas, a co-production between HAU Berlin and Schauspielhaus Zürich, in collaboration with Goethe-Institute Warschau and Teatr Nowy.

January 18-20, January 25-27 and February 1-3, 12-4 pm.

Located at the Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch Atrium and Vancouver Art Gallery, Lobby.

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Mariano Pensotti - Sometimes I think, I can see you


The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the Canadian premiere of two new films, by British artist Andrew Cross.

The Solo features Carl Palmer, legendary rock drummer of the 1970s supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, performing a series of specially composed drum solos in a work that explores the relationship between drummer and drum kit. The film examines different aspects of percussion, with the solo snare drum giving way to brushes, cymbals, hands, felt beaters, and finally a full drum kit solo. Through a process of rigorous editing, sequences of tightly framed images are constructed; Cross’ minimalist style giving rise to a consideration of the shifting nature of cultural value.

Ensemble is Cross’s latest collaboration with 1970s progressive rock musicians, focusing on a group once dubbed Europe’s biggest cult band: The Enid. Throughout their 36 year checkered history, The Enid have both captivated and confounded audiences, always defying clear categorization. In this characteristically restrained film—contradicting the conventions of the “rock-umentary” with the unlikeliest of rock stars—Cross presents an intimate portrait of enigmatic founder Robert John Godfrey together with current band members at their studio and collective home in Northampton, England, and their recent concert with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

In partnership with PuSh Festival and SFU Woodward’s.

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Andrew Cross - The Solo & Ensemble


To create is to relate was the first exhibition in Canada of the influential work of Sister Corita Kent who came to fame for her silkscreen prints while teaching at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles in the 1960s. The exhibition developed in association with the Corita Art Center, Los Angeles and MOCFA, San Francisco focuses on Corita’s work from this period when we see the rapid visual move from a muted palette to one where figurative style is replaced by an increasing use of large areas of intense abstract colour. Mixing advertising slogans and poetry in her silkscreens and commandeering nuns and students to help make ambitious installations, processions and banners, Corita’s work is now recognized as some of the most striking – and joyful – American art of the 60s. The exhibition also shows a shift in the manner Corita brings words into her compositions often fragmented whereby they become image. The size of the serigraphs also increases and for Corita the absorption of the burgeoning media signage, commercial systems and slogans she saw play an important role in the development of her work. She embraced the urban environment, the commonplace becoming far from empty wasteland, rather a vehicle for hope and rejoicing. In someday is now (1964) for example, the partial block letters clearly derive from SAFEWAY supermarkets; somebody had to break the rules (1967) has the phrase jumbled but taken from a laundry detergent of the day.

Corita’s work and its community engagement marked a decade of utopian thinking but were rooted in the belief that direct action can cause real change. As such she asserts the continuum between daily life and art through her work, and challenges our expectations of what and how we encounter art. This lack of division between form and activity makes for a compelling argument against the notion of detached art experience both for artists and the audience. In this way, it chimes with the Contemporary Art Gallery in our belief that art and its conventions should not be divorced from our everyday experience and have meaning to everyone.

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Corita Kent - To create is to relate


A Way To Go was the first part of the “GPS PROJECT” generated through the Education Program of Contemporary Art Gallery.

The word “Alley” comes from the original French root word “Allée” which literally translates as; A Way To Go. This was a walking journey project that consisted of using the GPS mobile device to navigate an alternative route through the downtown core by only taking alleyways and shortcuts. The passage was less distracting than crowded streets and avoided being a target for consumers by staying off the main roads. These routes are named after brief encounters with objects and/or subjects found in each individual alleyway rather than being named after important political figures or national historical references like most main roads in Vancouver. The names of the alley were included in the GPS map application. Through this journey, the participants came across site-specific installations, images activated by the GPS device, video clips and information about hidden spaces in the back alley.

Examples of this were images taken from inside an abandoned Japanese Auto Centre that has no access to the general public. Also an installation that was installed behind the fenced up corner in an underground parking lot to prevent homeless over-night staying, another example were details about a recycled water container underneath the Emery Barnes Park. This project continued to unfold describing more hidden objects/subjects in the allies of Vancouver’s downtown core over the following 3 months.

This program is generously supported by TELUS, 2010 Legacies Now and the Canadian Art Foundation. With thanks to Hannah Hughes and Autobox.

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Ron Tran - A Way To Go


Clip/Stamp/Fold was the first exhibition of independent architectural magazines produced in the 1960s and 1970s. It was curated by renowned architectural theorist Beatriz Colomina and a group of PhD students at the Princeton University, School of Architecture. The exhibition was first presented in New York at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2006. It has since met great critical acclaim especially for remaining geographically specific to each city where it is presented. While the concept and presentation elements are portable, the archival magazines vary, being sourced from local collections. Since its debut in New York, it has traveled to the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal; Documenta 12, Kassel; AA, London; and Norsk Form, Oslo with plans to go to Madrid and Barcelona.

With the help of architectural critic and curator Adele Weder, the CAG researched and assembled from local collections architectural magazines for exhibition. Clip/Stamp/Fold also included custom wallpaper featuring images of the magazines, facsimiles of historical magazines for viewers to peruse, and a historical timeline examining the social and political contexts behind many of the collected magazines.

For Clip/Stamp/Fold 6, the CAG organized a comprehensive program of talks, inviting architects, writers and publishers from the region to respond to the exhibition. Beatriz Colomina gave public a lecture on the exhibition on October 14.

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Clip/Stamp/Fold 6: THE RADICAL ARCHITECTURE OF LITTLE MAGAZINES 196X-197X


In celebration of its 30th Anniversary, the Contemporary Art Gallery presented an exhibition and project honoring its early years. On February 23, 1973, the Artists’ Gallery opened its doors at 555 Hamilton Street. Later to be renamed the Contemporary Art Gallery, the Artists’ Gallery was initiated by an arts advisory committee under the umbrella of the City of Vancouver. Central to its early mandate and philosophy was the promotion and creation of local visual arts.

During this time the City of Vancouver began a program, with assistance from the Federal Local Initiatives Program (LIP) to purchase works by local artists. In support of this ambitious project, the Artists’ Gallery was conceived as both a depository and exhibition space. The Contemporary Art Gallery continues to act as custodian for over 3000 collected works, many dating from the early to mid 1970s when the bulk of the collection was assembled.

The history of this important collection of art, of the Artists’ Gallery, and of the early years of the community that shaped what would become the Contemporary Art Gallery will be showcased this summer in an exhibition featuring works from the collection.

Project Organizers: Reid Shier and Shawn Preuss

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L.I.P. Service, CAG 30th Aniversary: The Collection 1973-1983


On the last Saturday of each month, the CAG invites all ages to drop-in for short exhibition tours and free art making activities that respond to our current exhibitions.

Saturday, May 28, 12–3pm
Plant Patterns
Responding to Jochen Lempert’s photographs of flora and fauna participants will use crayons to create rubbings of leaves, feathers and other natural materials to create a collage. Guided, hands-on exploration of Beatty Biodiversity Museum fossils and specimens will also be offered.

Presented in collaboration with ArtStarts on Saturdays. For more details visit: www.artstarts.com/weekend

We acknowledge the generous support of the Hamber Foundation for our Family Day program.

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Family Art Day | Plant Patterns


Nigel Prince
Saturday, May 28, 3pm
Join CAG Director, Nigel Prince for a guided tour of Jochen Lempert’s exhibition.

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Nigel Prince | Tour of exhibitions


In Conversation: Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips
Performance by the artist
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Ave

Amaara Raheem is Twenty-Three Days at Sea’s fourth artist-in-residence. A Sri Lankan born dance artist, based between Melbourne, Australia, and London, UK, Raheem’s practice places her own body in fluid states to investigate the aesthetics and ethics of mobility. Raheem departed for Shanghai on the MV Hanjin Geneva on April 19, and upon her return from Asia in May, CAG will host her at the Burrard Marina Field House to process the experience and produce work.

At this event, held at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House, Raheem and Access Director/Curator Kimberly Phillips will converse about the role of anticipation and imagination in her preparations for the residency voyage, Raheem will also perform a new work in response to her time at sea.

Amaara Raheem is a Sri Lankan born, Melbourne and London based dance artist. Her practice investigates the ethics and aesthetics of mobility, placing language, objects and movement in parallel, in order to embody flux. She is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Design and RMIT Melbourne.

Twenty-Three Days at Sea: A Travelling Artist Residency is an Access Gallery initiative, produced in partnership with the Burrard Arts Foundation and Contemporary Art Gallery.

Partial sponsorship of the sea voyages is graciously offered by Reederei NSB, assistance in Asia by China Residencies and Art Contraste, and at the Port of Vancouver by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union.

More information at accessgallery.ca

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In Conversation - Amaara Raheem with Kimberly Phillips - with performance by the artist


Tommy Ting

Sunday, June 19, 3pm

Join artist Tommy Ting for a tour of the current exhibition in Mandarin.

Guided visits are open to the public, providing free opportunities to engage with exhibitions and develop new skills for interpreting contemporary art. We also encourage visits from primary and secondary schools, ESL groups, university and college students and community groups. For more information or to book a guided visit for your group, contact learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca or telephone 604 681 2700.

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Tommy Ting | Tour in Mandarin


Claudia Beck on Jochen Lempert
Saturday, June 11, 3pm

Claudia Beck is an art collector and writer who lives and works in Vancouver. She will lead a personal response to the work of Jochen Lempert.

From 1976 to 1982, Claudia Beck and Andrew Gruft ran NOVA Gallery focusing on photography by artists including: Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron, Walker Evans, Ian Wallace and N.E. Thing Co. They were the first gallery to exhibit the work of Jeff Wall and are considered pioneers among commercial photography galleries. Beck and Gruft have since donated a large portion of their photography collection to the Vancouver Art Gallery, which was featured in the exhibition Real Pictures in 2005. Beck curated the exhibition of work by Christopher Williams at CAG as well as serving as a Board member and was also a trustee of the Vancouver Art Gallery. Previously she served for four years as Head of the Acquisitions Committee of The Getty Museum Photo Council in Los Angeles.

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Claudia Beck on Jochen Lempert


Jocelyn Statia
Sunday, June 10, 3pm
CAG Visitor Coordinator, Jocelyn Statia leads a tour of the current exhibitions.

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Jocelyn Statia | Tour of the exhibitions


Jas Lally
Saturday, June 18, 3pm
Assistant Curator, Jas Lally offers a guided visit of the exhibitions on display.

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Jas Lally | Tour of the exhibitions


Mike Boursheid
Saturday, July 9, 3pm
Join us for a guided visit of the exhibitions on display in French led by artist Mike Boursheid.

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Mike Boursheid| Tour in French


Maddy Tranter
Sunday, July 10, 3pm
CAG Visitor Coordinator, Maddy Tranter leads a tour of the current exhibitions.

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Maddy Tranter | Tour of the exhibitions


SFU Philosopher’s Café: Art Salons with Curator, Shaun Dacey

Saturday, May 14, 3pm

Discussing the Jochen Lempert exhibition and Jérôme Havre’s photographic installation at the Yaletown Station.

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SFU Philosopher’s Café: Art Salons on Jérôme Havre & Jochen Lempert


Screening event presented by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson
Presented by CAG in partnership with Cineworks.

Friday, February 12, 7pm
Cineworks Annex, 235 Alexander Street, Vancouver

Works screened include: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

‘Missives’, is a new free broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities.

The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

Alongside this, the screening event at Cineworks Annex (February 12 from 7pm), invokes a provisional social space, cinema and theatrical set where a temporary community may gather, through which a selection of film and video works explore first person narratives, interview, account and witness in queer Canadian moving image production, and reflect upon our viewing of it in a contemporary context. Presenting older works framed through their practice the evening engages an intergenerational conversation and includes: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

The MISSIVES broadsheet and screening event are generously supported by the British Council.

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Screening | Missives


Weekend events at CAG as part of ‘For a New Accessibility’ Nov 20 to 22, 2015

When I Walk
Film Screening & Tele-talk with Director: Jason DaSilva
Saturday, November 21: 7-9pm
Free admission

In 2006, 25-year-old Jason DaSilva was on vacation at the beach with family when, suddenly, he fell down. He couldn’t get back up. His legs had stopped working; his disease could no longer be ignored.  Just a few months earlier doctors had told him that he had multiple sclerosis, which could lead to loss of vision and muscle control, as well as a myriad of other complications. Jason tried exercise to help cope, but the problem only worsened. After his dispiriting fall on the beach, he turned to his Mom, who reminded him that, despite his disease, he was still a fortunate kid who had the opportunity to pursue the things he loved most: art and filmmaking. Jason picked up the camera, turned it on his declining body, and set out on a worldwide journey in search of healing, self-discovery, and love.

An emotional documentary filled with unexpected moments of humor and joy, WHEN I WALK is a life-affirming film driven by a young man’s determination to survive—and to make sense of a devastating disease through the art of cinema.

Read more about the film:

http://wheniwalk.com/about/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1395808/

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Film Screening & Tele-talk with Director: Jason DaSilva - When I Walk


FOR A NEW ACCESSIBILITY panel discussion
Sunday, November 22nd 11-1pm

In conjunction with ‘For a New Accessibility’ (November 20-22, 2015) a convergence of artists and activists meeting around the theme of organizing for accessibility and mutual aid produced in partnership with Gallery Gachet and artist Carmen Papalia.

Amanda Cachia, Carmen Papalia, Cheryl L’Hirondelle and Margaret Dragu: moderated by Cecily Nicholson.

The social condition of disability—in which a group or individual is disempowered by the systems that they are in relation to—is an epidemic that effectively marginalizes entire communities with diverse and complex needs. Locally, this oppression plays out in schools, hospitals, cultural institutions, policing, and through various arms of government, making the effort to claim agency a strategic, high-stakes intervention.

The panel will consider a series of propositions as we think/move towards a new accessibility:
-How do we collectively change a/this system of oppression?
-How can we provoke institutional entities to evolve?
-How does our negotiation of access alter our environment?
-What are the tenets of an open model for access?

BIO’s of participants:

Amanda Cachia is an independent curator from Sydney, Australia and is currently completing her PhD in Art History, Theory & Criticism at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation will focus on the intersection of disability and contemporary art. She held the position Director/Curator of the Dunlop Art Gallery in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada from 2007-2010, and has curated approximately 30 exhibitions over the last ten years in various cities across the USA, England, Australia and Canada. http://www.amandacachia.com/

Margaret Dragu works in video, installation, new media & performance art. Dragu’s performancesspan relational, durational, interventionist & community-based works. Her 45+ year practice encompasses writing, dance, theatre anda body/movement teaching that includes dance, aerobics/yoga and personal training specializing in Clinical Exercise. Margaret is also a one-woman TV Station (VERBFRAUTV). a 2012 Laureate of the Canadian Governor-General’s Award for Visual Art and Media, the recipient of City of Richmond’s Most Innovative Artist Award, Ethel Tibbett’s Woman of the Year Award for The Arts, Richmond Women’s Centre’s Inspirational Woman Award & Mall Peepre Award for Outstanding Fitness Leader. She is an internationally famous cleaning lady.

Cheryl L’Hirondelle is an Alberta-born mixed blood (Cree/Metis/German/Polish) community-engaged multi / interdisciplinary artist and singer/songwriter, who has been presenting and exhibiting her work since the 1980’s. Her creative practice investigates a Cree worldview (nêhiyawin) in contemporary time-space. L’Hirondelle uses song, voice, audio and more to develop endurance-based performances, interventions, site-specific installations, participatory projects while she keeps singing and writing songs where ever and with whomever she can. Currently Toronto-based, Cheryl has performed and exhibited her work widely both in Canada and abroad, and her previous musical efforts and new media work have garnered her critical acclaim and numerous awards.

Carmen Papalia is a Social Practice artist who makes participatory projects on the topic of access as it relates to public space, the Art institution and visual culture. His work has been featured as part of exhibitions and engagements at: The Solomon R. Guggenheim museum, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the L.A Craft and Folk Art Museum, the CUE Art Foundation, the Grand Central Art Center, the Portland Art Museum, the Columbus Museum of Art and the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Contemporary Art Gallery, 555 Nelson Street, Vancouver, contact@contemporaryartgallery.ca
www.contemporaryartgallery.ca

Register here: http://gachet.org/for-a-new-accessibility-registration-page/

Program: http://gachet.org/for-a-new-accessibility-program/

Convergence schedule: http://gachet.org/fana-2015-schedule/

===================
Accessibility information
===================

***Locations***

Gallery Gachet
88 E Cordova

front door: 5 feet width
front door step: 6 inch height
ramp: 34 inch width

washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 10 inch clearance on left side
14 inch clearance in front to sink
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://radicalaccessiblecommunities.wordpress.com/2013/05/26/this-audit-of-gallery-gachet-was-performed-on/

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson St

front door: 33 3/4 inch width x 2 (double doors)
no steps at entrance.
washroom door: 33 3/4 inch width
toilet: 11 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B81n0augDG8kfnB2V19uZlpBX0h2MmtKVzBWQThsZ2NiZjlEVzRUUlpLdTRoTlU3aXo3cFU&usp=sharing&tid=0B81n0augDG8kU2NfRlZSa3pIQ00

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House
573 E Hastings

front door: 34 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 31 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Enterprising Women Making Art
800 E Hastings

front door: 33 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
washroom is all genders

***ASL Interpretation***

ASL Interpretation will be offered by default for the following events:

Opening night: 7pm – 9pm Friday November 20th at Gallery Gachet

Bodies in Deliberate Motion lecture: 1:00 – 3:00 pm Saturday, November 21st at Gallery Gachet

For A New Accessibility Panel Discussion: Sunday November 22nd 11:00 – 1:00 pm at CAG

Reverb: A Queer Reading Series: Sunday November 22nd 2:00 – 5:00 pm at CAG

For booking ASL interpretation at any of the other programs of the convergence please email: contact@gachet.org or come visit us in person.

***Scent-reduced Policy***

In order to create a space where folks with multiple chemical sensitivities can participate at all of our venues, please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products (including essential oils) and smoke far away from the entrances to the spaces. To request a For info on how to support folks with multiple chemical sensitivities, visit: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

***Childcare***

Childcare will be offered throughout the convergence. Please remember to let us know in your registration what your childcare needs are.

Image: Carmen Papalia leads a tour as part of a feedback series talk at the CAG in 2014.

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FOR A NEW ACCESSIBILITY - panel discussion


Reverb – readings
Sunday, November 22, 2-5pm

Readers at this REVERB are: Adèle Barclay, Vi Levitt, Hiromi Goto, Lucas Crawford and Kay Ho

In conjunction with ‘For a New Accessibility’ (November 20-22, 2015) a convergence of artists and activists meeting around the theme of organizing for accessibility and mutual aid produced in partnership with Gallery Gachet and artist Carmen Papalia.

REVERB is an anti-oppressive, quarterly reading series for queer writers on unceded Musqueam, Sḵwxwú7mesh, and Tsleil-Waututh land. All our writers self-identify on a spectrum of queerness that centres trans* and femme experiences. All of our events are held in physically and financially accessible spaces, and with every event, we make at least one change to ensure that REVERB becomes more and more accessible. We promise to do all we can to create a safer space — bring your suggestions! Check your assumptions at the door; REVERB is a body-positive, anti-racist, anti-sexist, and hella queer- and trans-positive event. http://reverbqueerreadingseries.weebly.com/

Accessibility information:

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson Street

front door: 33 3/4 inch width
no steps at entrance.
washroom door: 33 3/4 inch width
toilet: 11 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: Accessibility Audit for CAG
ASL interpretation will be provided.

In order to create a space where folks with multiple chemical sensitivities can participate at all of our venues, please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products (including essential oils) and smoke far away from the entrances to the spaces. To request a For info on how to support folks with multiple chemical sensitivities, visit: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

Childcare will be offered. Please let us know in your FANA registration what your childcare needs are.

LINKS:

http://gachet.org/event/for-a-new-accessibility/

Full Schedule: http://gachet.org/fana-2015-schedule/
===================
Accessibility information
===================

***Locations***

Gallery Gachet
88 E Cordova

front door: 5 feet width
front door step: 6 inch height
ramp: 34 inch width

washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 10 inch clearance on left side
14 inch clearance in front to sink
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://radicalaccessiblecommunities.wordpress.com/2013/05/26/this-audit-of-gallery-gachet-was-performed-on/

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson St

front door: 33 3/4 inch width
no steps at entrance.
washroom door: 33 3/4 inch width
toilet: 11 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B81n0augDG8kfnB2V19uZlpBX0h2MmtKVzBWQThsZ2NiZjlEVzRUUlpLdTRoTlU3aXo3cFU&usp=sharing&tid=0B81n0augDG8kU2NfRlZSa3pIQ00

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House
573 E Hastings

front door: 34 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 31 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Enterprising Women Making Art
800 E Hastings

front door: 33 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
washroom is all genders

***ASL Interpretation***

ASL Interpretation will be offered by default for the following events:

Opening night: 7pm – 9pm Friday November 20th at Gallery Gachet

Bodies in Deliberate Motion lecture: 1:00 – 3:00 pm Saturday, November 21st at Gallery Gachet

For A New Accessibility Panel Discussion: Sunday November 22nd 11:00 – 1:00 pm at CAG

Reverb: A Queer Reading Series: Sunday November 22nd 2:00 – 5:00 pm at CAG

For booking ASL interpretation at any of the other programs of the convergence please email: contact@gachet.org or come visit us in person.

***Scent-reduced Policy***

In order to create a space where folks with multiple chemical sensitivities can participate at all of our venues, please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products (including essential oils) and smoke far away from the entrances to the spaces. To request a For info on how to support folks with multiple chemical sensitivities, visit: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

***Childcare***

Childcare will be offered throughout the convergence. Please remember to let us know in your registration what your childcare needs are.

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Reverb – readings


Panel Discussion: Sustenance Festival
With Randy Lee Cutler, Holly Schmidt, Gaye Chan, Derya Akay and Keg de Souza
Saturday, October 17, 3pm

In conjunction with the Sustenance Festival: a city-wide festival with local food-focused workshops, exhibitions and talks, CAG has organized a panel examining artistic practices that consider food security, sovereignty and knowledge sharing. www.sustenancefestival.ca

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Panel Discussion: Sustenance Festival


Feedback Series Events: Tad Hozumi
Saturday, June 6, 13 and 27, 4pm

Hozumi is a Vancouver-based artist and hip hop therapist, involved in local street dance culture and currently working on a body of photo, installation, social intervention and performance work that explores the history of struggle coded in to the subversive vocabulary of street style dances. Responding to the pop culture references of Julia Dault’s paintings he will curate a collection of records, on June 6 and 13 he will conduct a series of participatory movement workshops building on his selections. On June 27 Hozumi will give a talk on the practice of crate digging AKA record collecting and play a live set.

Tad Hosumi: vinyl + music blog “Back Ground Music” http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com

Tad Hozumi’s feedback events reflect his experiences as an artist, deejay and movement based therapist he will respond to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition ‘Blame It On the Rain’ by playfully referencing elements found in her work.

Hozumi has resourced his record collection in search for albums such as ‘Sweet Hone’ in the Rock’s Self-Titled; Brian Auger’s ‘Oblivion Express Live Oblivion’; Donny Hathaway’s ‘Extensions of a Man’ and Gino Soccio ‘Outline’. For Hozumi these records resonate with Dault’s work and inform the two movement based participatory events. The first class will be led by disco dancer and yoga teacher, Gary Quon. The second movement class will be based on expressive movements led by Hozumi. He will also host an artist talk and deejay an event to cap off the feedback series.

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE! Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

Feedback Talks:
This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Events: Tad Hozumi


Screenings and reception at Western Front, 303 E 8th Avenue, Vancouver

Reception: Thursday, June 26, 7-9pm.
Screenings: Friday, June 27 – Sunday, June 29, 12 -5pm.

The Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG), Western Front and Dim Cinema present a weekend-long screening in the Grand Luxe Hall of 2014 Turner Prize nominee, Duncan Campbell’s film Bernadette, as part of the CAG exhibition The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes. Bernadette presents an open and indirect account of Irish dissident and political activist Bernadette Devlin, constructed out of archival footage from the 1960s and early 1970s. Campbell approaches documentary as form of fiction, revealing the complex relationship between author, subject and audience.

Duncan Campbell, born 1972 in Dublin, lives and works in Glasgow. His solo exhibitions include: Duncan Campbell, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2012);  Arbeit, Hotel, London (2011); Duncan Campbell, Belfast Exposed, Belfast (2011); Make It New John, Artist Space, New York and Tramway, Glasgow (2010); Duncan Campbell, Kunstverein Munich, Munich (2009); Bernadette, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2009); Bernadette and Sigmar, MUMOK, Vienna (2009); Art Now Lightbox: Duncan Campbell, Tate Britain, London (2009); 0-60, ICA, London (2008); Art Statements, Art Basel 38, Basel (2008); The Unnameable, Lux at Lounge, London (2006); Something in Nothing, TART Contemporary, San Francisco (2005); Falls Burns Malone Fiddles, Luis Campaña, Cologne (2004). His group exhibitions include: The Big Society, Galerie Vallois, Paris (2011); British Art Show 7,  Nottingham and Hayward Gallery, London  (2010); Critical Fetishes, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2010); Asking Not Telling, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2009);  Fight the Power, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2009); After October, Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York (2008); Art Now, Tate Britain, London (2006); The Need to Document, Halle für Kunst, Lueneburg (2005); Manifesta 5, European Biennial of Contemporary Art, San Sebastian (2004); Advertence, festival of documentary film , Belfast and Dublin (2003); Fresh and Upcoming, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt (2003); Shadazz, Royal College of Art, London (2002). He had been nominated for the 2014 Turner Prize.

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Bernadette - Duncan Campbell


Tim Etchells
Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First
Monday, January 20  , 7 pm, by donation
The Fox Cabaret,  ‚2321  Main Street

Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First, written and directed by Tim Etchells, is a long free-associating
monologue that tumbles from topic to topic to create a vast, failing iteration and explanation of the world. Comical in its apparent naivety and preposterously encyclopedic in scope, the piece explores the absurdity and horror of consciousness as it tries and fails to seize and define everything that it encounters. Performed by Jim Fletcher, legendary New York actor, best known for his work with Richard Maxwell’s New York City Players and Elevator Repair Service’s Gatz, the monumental, word-for- word, eight hour staging of Fitzgerald’s prose masterwork. Join us post-performance for a drink and a conversation with Jim Fletcher and Tim Etchells, hosted by Norman Armour, Artistic and Executive Director of PuSh, in the newly renovated Fox Cabaret.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

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Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend To Lose First - Tim Etchells


Ant Hampton and Tim Etchells
The Quiet Volume
January 17–19,  24­–26€, 31‚, February 1– 2
12–ƒ5 pm (€…60 minutes, no intermission)
Performances every 20 minutes, last performance 4­:…ƒ05pm
Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch
3‚rd Floor, ‚ƒ… 350 West Georgia Street

In The Quiet Volume — set at the library, designed for two at a time — recorded instructions and a stack of carefully selected books direct you through this contemplative, self-generated performance. The Quiet Volume takes what is considered a deeply personal and internal process and pushes it out into the surrounding environment so that one reader’s sphere collides with another’s. It exposes the particular tension common to libraries worldwide: a combination of silence and concentration within which different peoples’ experiences of reading unfold. In this performance, you and your co-reader/fellow audience member study printed words, conjure mental images, examine the act of reading in a new light in this surprising piece of ‘autoteatro.’ For the bibliophile and reluctant reader alike, The Quiet Volume exposes the strange magic at the heart of the reading experience.

Presented with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and supported by Vancouver Public Library.

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The Quiet Volume - Ant Hampton & Tim Etchells


Interludes: Aurélien Froment
Monday, January 20 , 7.30 pm
Tickets $9 – $11– (plus $3 Cinematheque membership)
The Cinematheque, 1131 Howe Street

DIM Cinema, an ongoing series at The Cinematheque, presents videos by the French artist Aurélien Froment, to complement his first Canadian solo exhibition, at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Often using the format of instructional videos, Froment examines the semantic power of images and their elusive relationship to words. Viewers will emerge from the screening having learned more about the production of paper, the life cycle of the medusa, the ergonomics of sitting, the invention of kindergarten, the tying of knots and the palace of memory, than they ever thought possible in the space of 90 minutes. Each one of these analytical, self-reflexive studies works in its own way as a witty or poetic reminder that interpretation is subjective, meaning is never fixed and what one sees is not what others see.

Presented in association with The Cinematheque and PuSh International Performing Arts Festival.

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Screening - Interludes: Aurélien Froment


Button Wall was created for the CAG by Rethink Communications as the first step in the CAG’s first-ever public awareness media campaign. Fifty thousand buttons, each bearing a word that might describe your response to an artwork, were attached to the façade of our building. In less than 48 hours almost all of them have gone walking, attached to gallery visitors and now circulating among a vast potential audience for contemporary art in the city.

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CAG Button Wall


Join us for family activities and create your own Corita silkscreen print on T-shirts, bags, banners and boxes or rubber stamped artwork. The workshop will be followed by a birthday procession through the Yaletown neighbourhood.

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CAG Birthday and Family Day


Yoga workshop held  in the gallery surrounded by the large-scale drawings by Chinese artist Guo Fengyi. The Contemporary Art Gallery partnered with Yoga Outreach and Master Tantric yoga teacher Mary-Jo Fetterly who led a class held in the context of the solo exhibition of Fengyi’s complex and intricate drawings.

 

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Yoga in the Gallery


Night School is a program for new collectors and contemporary art enthusiasts, an introductory contemporary art survey that is intentionally accessible, intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Lectures by instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world. A suggested reading list will complement the discussion program. Along with the lectures, the participants will also engage in three studio visits with internationally recognized local artists including: Vikky Alexander, Gareth Moore, Elizabeth McIntosh, and tours of exhibitions by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun – Unceded Territories at the Museum of Anthropology and upcoming exhibition, MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Wednesday March 16, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 1 – The French Salon

Sunday March 20, 3:30-5:00 pm
Studio Visit 1 with Vikky Alexander

Wednesday March 23, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 2 – Matter Is Meaning

March 23 – April 2
Easter Reading Week Break (no session)

Sunday April 3, 3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibition Visit – MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture
Vancouver Art Gallery

Sunday April 10, 3:30-5:00 pm
Studio Visit 2 with Elizabeth McIntosh

Wednesday April 13, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 3 – Absorbing Abstractions

Sunday April 24, 3:30-5:00 pm
Studio Visit 3 with Gareth Moore

Wednesday April 27, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 4 – Surrealism and Other Truths

Friday May 6, 6:00-7:00 pm
Exhibition preview for Jochen Lempert

Sunday May 15, 12:30
Curator’s Tour – Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Museum of Anthropology

Cost: $375, includes a complimentary CAG membership.

Payments can also be made by monthly installments.

Space is limited – 20 seats – filling up fast!

To register contact Kristin Cheung, Development Officer at k.cheung@contemporaryartgallery.ca or call 604 681 2700.

 

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Night School IV


Sylvia Kind, PhD is an instructor in the School of Childhood Studies at Capilano University and an atelierista at the Capilano University Children’s Centre. Her work is motivated by an interest in artistic ways of knowing, children’s studio practices, experimentations with art as research in early childhood settings and the intersections of art and pedagogy. Kind will respond to elements of play in Ryan Gander’s exhibition.

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Feedback Series Talk - Sylvia Kind


Re-visions
Bo Ha, Chris Mills, Diego Romero, Elizabeth Ellis, Megan Low, Natalie Murao, Robert Psutka, Sophia Wolfe

Re-visions brought together eight emerging artists from diverse backgrounds in visual, performing and literary arts. Unique perspectives combined into a larger collaborative multi-screen piece, the shared objective being to highlight the dynamism inherent in the processes of rapid (re)building as Vancouver evolves, remembering a recent past while gesturing towards an imagined future.

Read on for a report by emerging artist and Re-visions participant Elizabeth Ellis:

“In November 2014, a group of artists met at the CAG to begin an intensive learning program to produce a new media installation for TELUS Garden with the guidance of mentors Josh Hite, Brian Lye, and Jem Noble.

We spent a couple of months researching through studio and gallery visits, workshops, and artist talks. After generating some ideas, we set out as a group and began experimenting with different documentation tactics throughout the city. We walked through urban spaces and improvised along the way. We tried same-space shooting, giving each other instructions, and exploring methods rooted in psychogeography. We continually revised our ideas but were overwhelmed with the amount that we had, as a group of eight. It felt like there were unlimited directions to pursue.

We also had lectures given by artists in the city and during a final talk at the CAG, artist Laiwan reminded us to deeply listen: to be in-tune with the phenomena that’s personally interesting, and to expand our visual and emotional vocabulary—linking metaphors and creating language. This advice motivated the group to share what we were each invested in. Artists with dance and performance backgrounds approached the project focusing on movement, through the choreography of the camera body and the collection of images. Others considered integrating city archives and found footage, while some explored concepts around urban space and telecommunications. The challenge then became how to weave seemingly disparate ideas together into a collective piece. How did we experience the city space as individuals and yet also as a collective?

As we looked through each contribution in the editing stage, patterns emerged and a new language started to collectively form. We realized that what we initially thought were disconnected ideas actually echoed our diverse experiences of the city. Our process and works entangled with one another, and for me, this was one of the most rewarding aspects about the collaboration.

Thanks to our mentors, Cineworks, and the Contemporary Art Gallery for your generosity of time, dialogue, and support throughout this valuable learning opportunity.”

—Elizabeth Ellis

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Re-Visions: Improvisation & Collaboration - Telus Garden Building Project


Tidal Dérive

In September, the CAG welcomed New York-based artist Marie Lorenz back to Vancouver as an artist-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio and to complete her project Tidal Dérive.

The project, a multi-day dérive in a handmade driftwood boat along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands was from September 1 to 8, 2015. Studying tidal charts of the area, the artist used tides and currents to direct and drift the navigation of ocean and rivers. This simple act of journeying along the contemporary ecosystem and industrialized commercial port of Fraser offered a different and unfamiliar experience of space for city residents who travel over these bodies of water daily. The experience of floating, of movement controlled by natural forces, adds a specific dimension to one’s own observation: the viewer made aware of their own balance and form as they absorb the details of their surroundings, creating something new from something familiar.

The journey was live-streamed for the land-bound audience to follow, providing a mediated representation of the visceral experience of the expedition. See the video below for highlights from the journey.

Over the past two years Marie Lorenz has participated in a sequence of residencies at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House resulting in the development of a new Pacific-based series of projects centred on the launch of a handmade boat constructed from driftwood found along Vancouver’s coast line. The boat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed “tidal derives” in San Francisco with Southern Exposure and most recently along the Russian River with Look Up Gallery in Guerneville, California.

Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City in boats that she designs and builds, her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted, material forms that explore the intertidal zone. She envisions a city harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore; reorganizing things that we value and representing things that were thrown away. The tide examines the nature of each object with its own incomprehensible order; Lorenz’s driftwood boat a way to gather and record evidence in collaboration with the tide.

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Marie Lorenz - Tidal Dérive


On Friday, April 10, 2015 and in conjunction with the Canadian Art Foundation Vancouver Gallery Hop, the CAG hosted a talk by Canadian Art associate editor David Balzer based on his latest book ‘Curationism: How Curating Took Over the Art World and Everything Else’.

David Balzer is a Toronto-based critic, editor and teacher. He has written for The Globe and Mail, Modern Painters, Camera Austria, artforum.com, The Believer and others, and is the author of two books, the short-fiction collection Contrivances (Joyland/ECW Press) and the non-fiction study ‘Curationism: How Curating Took Over the Art World and Everything Else’ (Coach House Press/Pluto Press).

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David Balzer | Curationism: How Curating Took Over the Art World and Everything Else


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented a weekend of epic sound working with Vancouver based NURSE. Performing two six-hour presentations, this group of tonal alchemists created free improvisational music or Free-Continuum Music. The performances were ongoing throughout the day, the sound reacting to and in response to the environment as it unfolds over time, a constantly evolving texture throughout the building.

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NURSE | Performance


Gabrielle Moser is a writer, educator and curator based in Toronto. She regularly contributes to artforum.com, and her writing has appeared in Art in America, ARTnews, Fillip, Photography & Culture and the Journal of Visual Culture. She has curated exhibitions for Access Gallery, Gallery TPW, Xpace and Vtape. Moser holds a PhD in art history and visual culture from York University and teaches at OCAD University. She responded to the work of Krista Belle Stewart.

This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Talk | Gabriel Moser


CJSF interns Ana Costa + Anh Dang interview New York visual and video artist Maryam Jafri about her work AVALON (2011), which is Contemporary Art Gallery’s June 2014 exhibition The Act Of Seeing With One’s Own Eyes.

Jafri weaves themes of production, representation and role playing throughout her work.

Aired originally on CJSF’s Spoken Word Surprise July 1st (Tuesday 4pm)

Includes notes from CAG curator and excerpts from the June 26th artist talk.

www.maryamjafri.net/

Talk info + audio: www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/learning/a…yam-jafri/

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CJSF Radio interview with Maryam Jafri


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm

Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri. Her video work Avalon (2011) is included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

In her moving image works, Jafri blurs the distinction between scripted films and unscripted documentaries. In Avalon (2011), Jafri seamlessly weaves together stories from real life workers in an unnamed leather company in an unspecified Asian country, with a script that she wrote herself. The workers in this factory are not told that they are making fetish products to be sold to the masses in the United States, and this selective disclosure can be seen in the disconnect between the production process and the final product itself. Parallels can be made between the secretive nature within the leather factory, the viewer’s unsurety of who is an actor and who is not, as well as to the overall editing process which yields a carefully restrained video work about the complex topics of overseas factories and the world of fetish paraphernalia.

Jafri’s solo exhibitions include: Mouthfeel, Gasworks, London (2014); Backdrop, Bielefelder kustverein, Bielefeld, Germany (2013); Stages, WYSPA Institute of Art, Gdansk (2012); Geographies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde (2012); Headlines and Small Print (with Anderas Fogarasi), Galerie Nova/WHW Zagreb (2012); Global Slum, Beirut, Cairo (2012) and Shanghai Biennial and Taipei Biennial (2012). She has also exhibited in group exhibitions including: Fassbinder Jetzt – Fassbinder and Contemporary Art, Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt (2013); Past is Present (Murals), Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Ten Thousand Wiles, Hundred Thousand Tricks, MuKHA, Antwerp (2013); When Attitudes Became Forms Become Attitudes, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Manifesta 9, Genk (2012). Maryam Jafri lives and works in New York and Copenhagen. She holds a BA in Literature from Brown University, an MA from NYU/Tisch School of The Arts and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

www.maryamjafri.net/avalon.htm

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Artist Talk | Maryam Jafri


Brendan Fernandes
Tuesday, June 10, 7pm

Brendan Fernandes is a Canadian artist of Kenyan and Indian descent based between Toronto and New York City.
In this artist talk introducing Fernandes’ residency, he discussed his recent projects. This summer the CAG hosts a two month residency with Brendan Fernandes. At the core of the artist’s practice lies an investigation into the concept of authenticity, an ideological construct as a shaper of cultural experience.

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Artist Talk | Brendan Fernandes


Dhrupad vocalist Harkeerat Mangat and Tabla drummer Sunny Matharu performed at the Burrard Marina Field House, Vancouver, Wednesday August 14. The occasion was a launch for the 2013 Summer issue of FUSE magazine.

Images by Maria Fedorova.
Sound by Phil Dion.

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Harkeerat Mangat & Sunny Matharu - Perform Live at the Field House


Artist Sarah Browne discusses her work with CAG Director Nigel Prince, at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Sarah Browne


Landon Mackenzie: Map Room; The Act and State of Drawing. As part of Draw Down 2012, the city wide initiative, artist and educator, Landon Mackenzie orchestrated a day of drawing for visitors at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Rooted in her own practice and critical thinking, Mackenzie invited everyone to explore the potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being. This event was made possible with kind support from Opus Art and Framing.

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Workshop | Draw Down 2012


Endless Endless:
Robert Orchardson and Corin Sworn in-conversation with Richard Henriquez and Leslie Van Duzer

An in-conversation event between artists Orchardson and Sworn with architect Richard Henriquez and Leslie Van Duzer, Director and Professor, School of Architecture and Landscape
Architecture, UBC. Discussion will centre on topics of redundancy, memory and shifts in value and meaning over time.

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Endless Endless: Robert Orchardson and Corin Sworn in-conversation with Richard Henriquez and Leslie Van Duzer


Coast Salish artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun talks about his practice at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun


Camille Norment and Experimental Music UnitSongs for Glass Island, was presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, at Pyatt Hall, VSO School of Music. It was an engaging, performative sound work with Norwegian/US artist/musician Norment collaborating with Victoria’s Experimental Music Unit: Tina Pearson, George Tzanetakis, and Paul Walde.

It is intriguing that their collaborative sonic exploration departed from Robert Smithson’s unrealized earthwork project for Southwest BC, Glass Island (or Island of Broken Glass), proposed shortly before he created the famous (or is it infamous?) Spiral Jetty. Smithson’s project to cover an islet in the Strait of Georgia with crushed glass was drowned by the noisy objections of environmentalists, yet it’s echoes live on through a completely different type of (sonic) exploration. So, how does one project live through the failure of another?

A highlight of Norment and EMU’s event was our introduction to the glass armonica, a rare and legendary instrument dating back to the eighteenth century that uses glass, water and fingertips to create otherworldly sounds. These tuned glass “singing bowls” reputedly have healing properties, leading to reactions from the listener that vary from mesmerized to fearful, and even to a one-time ban on its use … strange but true! Mozart has even penned works for this enchanting instrument, and it’s other worldly sounds have accompanied music by contemporary musicians such as Linda Ronstadt, David Gilmour and Björk.

In an interview published in e-flux about her recent exhibition at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Norment touched on her fascination with the powers of sound: “I am interested in how music has long been used to facilitate both the forging and transgressing of cultural norms. Sound permeates all borders. Throughout history, fear has been associated with the paradoxical effects music has on the body and mind, and its power as a reward-giving de-centraliser of control.

Norment’s work has been described as visceral and poetic. From my personal perspective, much of my graduate research at SFU explores the human’s phenomenological relationship with the world, how our sensual experience with the surrounding environment plays a key role in defining who, and what, we are. Moreover, from an aural perspective, it is important to recognize that our location in the sonic environment is critical to our understanding and perception of it. I enjoyed exploring both of these concepts, and more, at Norment’s and EMU’s concert, immersing myself into the spellbinding soundscape.

– Jorma Kujala

Songs for Glass Island was presented by the CAG in partnership with LaSaM Music, Victoria and is supported by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway through its program for International Support, The Canada Council for the Arts, The University of Victoria through its Distinguished Women Scholars Fund, the Orion Fund in Fine Arts and the Department of Visual Arts.

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Tuning Into Other Worlds


Extra, extra, read all about it! The newspaper boys’ cries promoting the next big event are true: Missives, a free broadsheet organized by UK artist Patrick Staff and Vancouver based Writer and Curator Robin Simpson is now being distributed to a number of locations in Vancouver and Toronto utilizing Xtra! newspaper boxes re-designed by Staff, each painted black and draped with chain appliques (derived from Tom of Finland drawings that were also incorporated into Staff’s project).

This newsy, for one, is excited about this. Hi there, I’m Jorma Kujala, a Master’s Candidate with SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts’ MA Program in Comparative Media Arts. I am currently completing a practicum with the CAG, and the distribution and maintenance of Simpson and Staff’s reused newspaper boxes is one of the projects I am taking the lead on. Keep your eyes peeled to this blog site, I am looking forward sharing my insights with you about life at the CAG, and together we can explore front-of-house and behind the scenes nooks and crannies of Vancouver’s foremost contemporary arts gallery!

The Missives broadsheet is an extension and companion to a series of screenings in Vancouver (February 12) and Toronto generously supported by the British Council in Canada, and programmed by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson. I was happy to help out at last month’s screening, as it allowed me a chance to see the films and mix with a great crowd of cinephiles. The appropriated screening location, like the newspaper boxes, retained hints of past uses. For me, the editing equipment scattered about the edges of the Cineworks Annex screening room and the faint smell of darkroom chemicals closed the circle between the past life that created celluloid stories such as those being screened and their current “final life” broadcast to our contemporary audience.

Works screened included Mirha-Soleil Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990). The Man From Venus, a 4:00 black and white film from 1999, was particularly captivating, in part for its brimming, free-flowing dialogue of one person’s struggles for acceptance and understanding. Its edgy, experimental format, filmed in Vancouver’s downtown periphery, left me twitching both from its rapid-fire monologue, and its theme of life on the edge of humanity. Engaging with this young person’s dialogue and footage of him navigating life on the same streets I incorporate into my urban routine left me wondering if I, or perhaps you, had ever run into him – “… push me, hold me, let go of me, help me, help me…” – and more importantly, how I, or you, would have reacted had we met.

The other film I connected with offered an entirely different, yet equally captivating, personal journey. Rupert Remembers, a 23:45, colour film from 2000 offers Rupert Raj’s personal tour of people, places and spaces pivotal to 70’s and 80’s trans culture in Toronto, and indeed the rest of Canada. His wistful thoughts and reflections, recorded mostly with hand-held cameras, opened a genuine, honest and welcoming view into communities that many have difficulty accessing. I am very appreciative of both films for allowing me to enter their discussions, and offering me my own moment to pause and think… that is, when I wasn’t busy hustling and schlepping drinks from behind the bar!

Yes, from my vantage point serving drinks from behind the bar, the capacity crowd for the Missives screening certainly maximized all the carpeted, lounging floor space, leaving the rest of audience to occupy the periphery seating and standing area. The absorbed conversation by the audience throughout the evening certainly demonstrated the importance of engaging with stories, issues and politics raised by this screening, leaving us volunteers and staff to ever so gently nudge everyone towards the door as the screening wound to a close! I hope the Toronto screening is equally well attended, and generates the same, or more, positive dialogue as that brimming forth from our Vancouver event! And remember: you still have time to check out Patrick Staff’s The Foundation installation, continuing at the CAG until April 24th.

– Jorma Kujala

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Extra! Hear the News: Missives Broadsheet and Broadcast!


Re-Visions: Improvisation & Collaboration
In November 2014, a group of artists met at the CAG to begin an intensive learning program to produce a new media installation for TELUS Garden with the guidance of mentors Josh Hite, Brian Lye, and Jem Noble.

Megan Low, one of the participating artists writes on the production process, transformation and endlessness….

I’ve been thinking a lot about endings, especially since this project is now complete. It feels bittersweet that after the many months spent meeting, discussing, and hovering over computer screens, the thing exists beyond the seed of an idea.

I’ve also been returning to what artist Laiwan Laiwanette said to us in a talk about extending the life of a project through different mediums, and about documenting the process as part of the work itself.

Now that I can reflect on it, I sense that the work exists in written ideas and individual interpretation as much as it does on screen. There are moments in it that linger and make you question the reality you think you know, and moments left on the cutting room floor that are as much a part of the piece as what remains. It almost seems fit that, for a project exploring spatial transformations in relation to time, the work has undergone prolonged visions and re-visions.

Although there is a self-congratulatory satisfaction in having laboured over something that has finally made its way out into the world and being able to actually see it, what has been more satisfying has been the process itself. Connecting as a group—learning, doing, failing, and succeeding together—has been an invaluable experience, as has being afforded expert mentorship and guidance. I’m almost certain that I speak for everyone involved in saying that this opportunity has been transformative beyond measure in terms of skills and personal growth gained.

I picture the steady stream of people walking by or stopping to watch our piece as it loops continuously throughout the workday, and I can’t help but be poetic as I think of the city just outside continuously changing. I still wonder about endings…

– Megan Low

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Transformative experience and mentorship – on the Telus Garden Project by Megan Low


Curatorial Intern April Thompson sat down with John Wood during his recent visit to Vancouver.

Artists John Wood & Paul Harrison have been collaborating since the 1990s. With an interest in observing the human condition, they create art that questions how things work. Wood & Harrison are investigators, best known for their intricately structured film performances which carry the illusion of graceful accident. John Wood was recently in Vancouver to workshop their upcoming collaboration with Ballet BC – a choreographed live performance with up to 10 dancers (a first for the duo, who have not previously exhibited in Canada). I sat down with John to find out more about their practice, intent and progress.

AT: When did you and Paul Harrison begin to collaborate?

JW: Paul had a residency working in a local school in Bristol, where he was working on movement and the human body. I went and visited him to see what he was up to and we recognized that we were really interested in similar things. Our first collaboration didn’t come out until some years later in 1993. We had both been in MFA programs within painting but we were both not interested in painting and so I had my eye on Paul, I was aware that we had that similarity.

AT: As an artistic team you have been termed sculptors, architects, scientists, a slap-stick duo, magicians, mimes, conceptual performers and choreographers. Each of these titles speaks to your practice yet ultimately fails to contain you entirely. Is it your intention to evade definitive categorizations of your art practice?

JW: We are definitely a mixture of all of those things. It’s not that we try to evade categorization, more so that we are interested in blurring the boundaries. All of those things interest us in various ways and so our practice becomes a fusion of them. We have always been interested in popular materials and mass culture as much as any high art objects. We have watched a lot of bad movies and gained many ideas from there.

AT: Your creative process almost always begins with a sketch or diagram. As artists you are constantly switching between the realms of 2D and 3D. The filmed piece “100 Falls” features Paul Harrison entering a white room, dressed in black. He ascends a wooden ladder that leads off camera only to fall to the floor suddenly from above. The editing allows a seamless transition so that the viewer at first is unaware that the falling figure is a dummy. The gesture is repeated, with the figure again ascending the ladder, disappearing and falling. It is easy for one to imagine how this piece may have looked originally sketched out in a minimal diagram-like format. Do you encounter difficulties in this translation of your work from drawing into movement?

JW: Lots. When we work in 2D we have this kind of limitless freedom because we can imagine ideals in terms of movements and bodies and effects. It’s very different when we then move to 3D and are restricted by actual bodies and space. The genesis of drawings is very important to us as a part of the work. We like to create this kind of looping process: taking something from 2D form and making it into a 3D performance, but filming that to turn it into a flat 2D video, then placing it in a gallery where the viewer experiences it in a 3D setting. So, we are constantly switching between the two forms. We now have works that stand alone as drawing pieces, which is a new thing for us to move into – the drawing as having its own endpoint as a solo work. We are both really interested in the idea of the drawing as a kind of lexicon or encyclopedia. It’s a nice way of looking through our work, since we have a huge amount of drawings and sketches from our ideas – I would say about 300 stored up from the working out process.

AT: Your films have been described as being like a magic trick in which the trick is disclosed in the very act of carrying it out. Do you intend for the initial drawing to be somewhat perceptible in the end piece or do you seek to conceal the schematic process?

JW: The drawings are part of the process and so they are very much a part of the work in themselves. I would say that our sketches are perceptible in the end action, in that watching the performance you could imagine their initial form as drawings. It was always our idea, especially with the videos, for them to have that feel of a school textbook with diagrams, generic figures and drawn out instances.

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Interview with John Wood by April Thompson


On Thursday September 10th, Ryan Gander’s Make every show like it’s your last was a brilliant opening night. Drinking cocktails from his Artist’s Cocktails book and stumbling upon his surprising and sometimes hidden pieces, visitors were treated to a playful and entertaining show. The biggest hit of the night by far was Magnus Opus, Gander’s animatronic eyes that move around the room, blink, and offer a confused stare at onlookers. This lifelike work has now been posted by many on Instagram with the hashtag #RyanGander.

Instagram has been talked about lately as having a huge impact on the art world, on collecting and on artists’ careers. A recent article on Artsy pointed out how much art is collected, discovered and promoted on the app. A New York collector is quoted as saying “If your artwork isn’t represented on Instagram these days, do you exist?” In our digital society, many of us check Instagram multiple times a day and use it to stay up-to-date on our favourite public figures, new styles, current events, sports and for those of us that love art, art! It is a great way to access the happenings of the contemporary art world. Notable, and sometimes contentious photographer Richard Prince recently exhibited New Portraits at the Gagosian in New York, a show featuring blown-up screenshots on canvas of other’s Instagram images. There is an ongoing debate about whether Prince’s works are “stolen” or whether his use of the public application as a source for his work is completely fair. Clearly, Instagram has pervaded the functions of the art world and influences it considerably.

At the CAG, we use our own Instagram account (@cagvancouver) to share images from our exhibitions, artist-in-residence projects, openings, new art publications, behind the scenes at the gallery, from our archive, a sneak peek at future exhibitions and our learning events. It is wonderful to see others posting images from our exhibitions and events. It allows the followers of those posting the images to discover a new favourite artist or encourage them to come see the show. We also get an insight into visitors’ own thoughts on the exhibition.

Visit the CAG before November 11 to see Ryan Gander’s solo exhibition, Make every show like it’s your last. If you take a photo, be sure to tag #RyanGander and @cagvancouver so we can see it and share it, too!

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Make every Instagram like it’s your last


The Vancouver Art/Book Fair is currently on from October 17th to 18th, presented by Project Space at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The two-day event is free and open to the public, and offers a chance to browse and purchase printed matter (as well as digital, experimental and performative forms of publication) from local, national and international artists. It also features performances, programs and other unique artist projects. Leading up to this weekend, Project Space also organized Artists’ Books Week, an ‘open-source’ style series of events. As part of this, the CAG hosted an artist talk by Vancouver-based artist Ho Tam, who discussed his recent publications, including his hotam and Poser series.

Ho Tam is interested in experimenting with the printed format. He uses this medium to explore issues relevant to him in an effectively humorous way, using the model of the mass-distributed magazine to mimic popular print culture.  His first artist book, The Yellow Pages, confronts stereotypes often associated with Chinese culture. The Poser series are collections of photographs which showcase a specific group of people in a certain place, for example, images of men at the Canadian National Exhibition with their carnival game winnings—stuffed animals. His hotam series features self-titled issues that play with pun and humour, somehow always relating to the artist and his own lived experience. Issue 2, Other People’s Business, includes his abundant collection of business cards. Issue 5, Hot Asian Men, showcases the artist`s various photographs, clippings, and movie posters of just that.

Ho Tam’s publications: The Yellow Pages and hotam #1 are available for purchase on our website and in the CAG bookshop. Visit the book fair this weekend and enjoy more artist made publications!

More open-source events like this can be found on the VA/BF website, along with more information about the book fair itself.
Visit www.hotampress.com for more on Ho Tam’s publications.

– Kelli

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Ho Tam on hotam: Artists’ Books Week – Vancouver Art/Book Fair 2015


I’m Maddy Tranter, one of two new Visitor Coordinators at the CAG!

My interest in the CAG developed over my two years as a front desk and events volunteer, but my initial interest in art began much earlier! I took my first art history and costume history courses when I attended the National Ballet School in Toronto between 2004 and 2006. Ever since, art has become an integral part of my everyday life from my education and work to my time spent travelling.

So far, my first two months at the gallery have been very exciting hiring and managing volunteers, planning events and maintaining front of house operations with my coworker Jocelyn Statia. Together, we are busy helping Curator Shaun Dacey with the reading room and Programs Assistant Jas Lally with installation management.

This is a nice change of pace after recently graduating from UBC’s Art History program where I primarily focused on indigenous arts of the Northwest Coast and Asian Studies. At the CAG I am able to broaden my areas of interest as we intimately work with artists both locally and abroad!

– Maddy Tranter

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Hello from Maddy! Visitor Coordinator


Currently in August, interdisciplinary artists Sameer Farooq (Canada) and Mirjam Linschooten (France) are spending 2 weeks at the Burrard Marina Field House. Their combined practices aim to create community-based models of participation and knowledge production in order to re-imagine a material record of the present. They investigate tactics of representation and enlist the tools of installation, photography, documentary filmmaking, writing and the methods of anthropology to explore various forms of collecting, interpreting, and display. The result is often a collaborative work which counterbalances how dominant institutions speak about our lives: a counter-archive, alternate narrative, new additions to a museum collection, or a buried history become visible.

Farooq is currently working as a visual artist, educator, designer, and is a member of the documentary film collective Smoke Signal Projects as director. His artist book/print editions have been distributed through Art Metropole, Toronto. Linschooten works as an independent graphic designer and artist. She works with all types of print, such as books, magazines and posters, using typography and collage to transform existing material into a visual language that challenges established systems.

Farooq and Linschooten interrogate the ideas and values of organizations, claims about what a cultural group is and “ought to be”, protocols of approaching an object and images of who the intended viewer is – and use installation, photography, documentary filmmaking, writing and the methods of anthropology to examine various forms of collecting, interpreting and display. The result is often a collaborative work which counterbalances how institutions speak about our lives, producing a counter-archive. Related to these questions Farooq and Linschooten will begin development towards a Vancouver-specific public project engaging the ways Vancouver frames its multiculturalism via ethnographic museum display.

Farooq and Linschooten have exhibited in various countries including Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey. Recent projects include Faux Guide, Trankat, Morocco; The Museum of Found Objects, Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario; The Museum of Found Objects, Istanbul, Turkish Ministry of Culture; Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue, Artellewa, Egypt. Most recently the duo completed a residency and exhibition at Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga, Ontario which explores the complex space of social codes, ideological agendas and decisions, both conscious and unconscious, of museum display. Sameer Farooq (Canada) and Mirjam Linschooten (France) collaborate on projects.

– Shalon Webber-Heffernan, CAG Learning Assistant

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Sameer Farooq and Mirjam Linschooten at the Burrard Marina Field House


After much anticipation, Mungo Thomson makes his return to the CAG with his solo exhibition, Time, People, Money, Crickets, opening this Friday. The team has been hard at work preparing for the show. Now that it is down to the last few days of the install, I talked to programs assistant Jas Lally to find out about the challenges they have faced and the exciting things that will be occurring over the next month.

Because of the multitude of mediums explored by Mungo, from sculpture to performance to film and sound, the preparation has been unique. “When we install the works we have to be careful about the TIME mirror pieces in particular, because they  weigh about 100 pounds each, so they’re quite heavy,” Jas said. “We’ll have to be careful with the projection of the rolodex film as well.” Untitled (Margo Leavin Gallery 1970-)(2009) is a stop-motion 16mm film. “I am very excited to work with a 16mm projector again after Jeremy Shaw’s exhibition earlier this year” Jas added.

All of the pieces have been shipped from SITE Santa Fe, who the CAG is collaborating with to present this exhibition. The only issue was a slight hold up at the border. “You have to be prepared for delays in customs clearance,” Jas mentioned. “Once you speak to the agent and explain that it is artwork, it works out.” Thankfully, they are here in perfect shape and being hung up/suspended/tested/configured for Friday evening.

Jas mentioned that she is looking forward to Void and Observer (2013-2015). “Hopefully the viewer will read the label and go, ‘Hey, where’s this piece?’ I think the mis -marked coin will be the most unique and the most interactive piece.” The front desk staff might just have the answer.

Mungo’s Crickets (2012-2013), which one will be able to see, hear and read in the large gallery room, will also be performed live on the night of the opening. “We collaborated with Vancouver New Music to have four musicians perform the piece in neighbouring Emery Barnes Park,” Jas smiled, “The musicians will essentially be playing the role of  crickets. That will be fun.” This work definitely defines the show, being presented in live performance, video, sound and debossed score during the course of the exhibition.

Jas also organized a feedback talk around Crickets on July 28 with speakers Murray Isman, Professor of Applied Biology from UBC; Lucas Abela, a performance artist and Giorgio Magnanensi, Artistic Director of Vancouver New Music. “It’s really about getting something different and taking a chance. I hope the speakers will be able to engage with their personal experiences and reflect upon the piece,” Jas explained her unexpected choice of participants. “I believe that it’s important to bring in different perspectives so that the viewer has a more engaged experience.” We can’t wait to hear what the speakers have to say.

Finally, Jas expounded why we should all be looking forward to Mungo’s show. “Well, it’s Mungo! He’s been really great to work with and you can see how invested he is in his work.  It is going to be interesting to see how all the works come together in relation to each other, the everyday life, the wider historical contexts and the cosmic scale. I am most excited to see how the interactive aspects of the exhibition work out whereby the public are no longer just the audience, but participants.”

Join us this Friday, June 10 at 7pm for the opening, and head over to Emery Barnes Park at 8:30pm for the live performance of Cricket Solos for Clarinet, Piccolo, Percussion and Violin. Don’t miss the Feedback Talk on July 28, either! 

– Kelli Sturkenboom

 

 

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Behind the Scenes on Time, People, Money, Crickets


Tad Hozumi reflects on his first feedback series event for the CAG responding to the paintings by Julia Dault:

The first workshop of the feedback series, Yoga Boogie, started with an introspective meditation and a series of ‘quieter’ postures.

Workshop leader, Gary Quon picked out some beautiful songs, particularly Donny Hathaway’s I Love the lord He Heard My Cry Part One & Two, setting the tone for the workshop that was at times amusing and energetic but always grounded by an earthy and soulful spirituality.

It is very common for yoga classes to use music to set a mood, but here there was something new added, with Quon’s dedication to his craft as a dancer shining through. The climax of the workshop was a soul train to Gino Soccio’s Dancer. He really got everyone sweating! It was great to see Shaun work up a sweat, especially as he admitted before the class that he actually kind of hated yoga.

In fact, I kind of hated yoga as well, till recently. I thought of it as an inane repackaging of what was a serious introspective Eastern discipline. Kind of the spiritual equivalent of bad miso soup. I have met some great practitioners lately though, that seem to connect to the practice in a way that I can vibe with. Quon is definitely one of those people.

The session closed with meditation to Donny Hathaway’s Someday We’ll All Be Free and Sweet Honey in the Rock’s song, Sweet Honey in the Rock. Somewhere between gospel and Eastern wisdom we found a sense of quiet content.

On Saturday June 13 was my own Body Jazz workshop. I brought my street dancer skills to anchor the session that was designed to be both inviting to everyone and still be quite experimental. We connected to the rhythms in Dault’s works. If I can make a sweeping and general statement, I think abstraction in general has a funny place in art history. Its often kind of seen as the beginnings of an intellectualized approach to art but really when you look at the practice it is far from it.

In his introduction to Art Life, Lawrence Rinder writes about how Agnes Martin’s minimal and abstract works are always referred to as a link in art history between abstract expressionism and minimalism but never as a tool for meditation. I vibe with that. I like to think of artworks as tools as well. To that end we were channeling Dault’s works and the records I curated from her exhibition to explore our own potential as embodied beings.

My final session will be an artist talk and DJ session on Saturday, June 27 at 4pm, please join me then!

– Tad Hozumi

 

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Tad Hozumi meditates on ‘Yoga Boogie’


On Saturday, June 6th the CAG hosted Tad Hozumi and Gary Quon for the first of three Feedback events in response to Julia Dault’s exhibition, Blame It On The Rain. The Feedback Series is designed to work with cultural and critical producers to explore thoughts and ideas rooted in their own practices, inviting audiences to engage in conversations, and probe curiosities relevant to contemporary issues, theories, ideas, and culture.

Hozumi is a Vancouver-based artist and hip hop therapist who is involved in local street dance culture and is currently working on a body of photographic, installation, social intervention and performance works examining subversive vocabularies of street style dances. Hozumi responded to some of the pop culture references in Dault’s paintings by playing personally selected records. Gary Quon, a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini practices with elements of rhythm and dance, led a participatory and energetic movement workshop called Yoga Boogie choreographed to select music.

While participating in the 1.5 hour long workshop with Tad and Gary I thought a lot about what it meant to be moving and dancing with friends and strangers alongside Dault’s paintings, inside a gallery setting. Not only were our movements often informed and inspired by the paintings and environment, it felt like a reciprocal relationship was occurring—the paintings also seemed to be in dialogue with the space and the people within it.

On my first encounter with Julia Dault’s work, I was initially struck by what I sensed as a vulnerability in the paintings and sculpture – a certain humanness, an embodied quality—a visceral and gestural component to the paintings revealed through the materiality and everydayness of the work. The use of found fabric, unconventional tools (squeegees, rubber combs and sea sponges) allow Dault to play with the tensions between expressive abstraction and a cool and industrial characteristic which is most tangible upon first impression.

It is undeniable that the gallery space is enlivened by moving bodies dancing, laughing, sweating, clapping and singing—doing all the things that would normally make people squirm with discomfort or even embarrassment, especially within a space that is typically reserved for particular “etiquette”. The space was transformed, and for me being literally “embodied”, I was able to access a new depth in Dault’s work and see deeper levels and the existing knowledge inherent in the paintings.

It is interesting also to note the formalism and usual expectations of gallery etiquette that are transgressed by introducing contrary behaviors into the space – – there is certainly, at first, a self-consciousness or shyness that accompanies, say, doing yoga and chanting kundalini mantras in a space that is typically governed by a particular “way” of inhabiting the gallery space but after that fades the relationship between the bodies in space and the art seems to evolve.

The next feedback series event, Body Jazz, is taking place on Saturday, June 13th at 4pm and will again be hosted by Tad Hozumi. Hope to see you there!

– Shalon

 

 

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Dancing with Julia Dault


The CAG has invited artist, deejay and movement based therapist Tad Hozumi to create a series of feedback events and workshops in response to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition Blame It On the Rain.

His upcoming series of music and movement workshops and events will playfully reference elements found in her work.

Here Hozumi writes, the first in a series of blog reports, about his work and about preparing for the events and workshops:

Last weekend I installed a listening station for a selection of funk and disco vinyl records in the CAG bookshop (see above image). This listening station is part of my feedback response to the current exhibition: Julia Dault’s Blame It On the Rain. My initial task was to curate a selection of records that responded to Dault’s works and that served as the inspiration for a series of workshops. The curatorial method I undertook was really simple: Rhythms x Patterns x Geometry x Materials. Dault’s eye is similar to that of a crate-digger, she is constantly scanning the visible ‘debris’ in our environment for moments of resonance.

Crate-digging, if I can give the most romantic definition, is the practice of scouring through dusty bins of long forgotten music to unearth rare or special records. There are a lot of great crate-diggers out there, including Japan’s DJ Muro or Vancouver’s own Sipreano, who recently released Native North America Vol. 1 – Aboriginal Folk, Rock, And Country 1966–1985, a project that I am sure will go down as something of historical importance in our time.

Not all crate-diggers have an active public life, deejay or compile music. If I had to guess most are actually very private, sharing their collections with a few people who are willing to bear them in order to get a sneak peak at an unknown gem. There is one thing I am pretty sure of, digging while mysterious, certainly is not glamorous.

As a crate-digger, I’m just a baby. It’s exciting, because almost everything I come across is new to me. Perusing bins at a thrift shop will almost always turn up some new discoveries. I used to think I had a pretty good handle on music. I was wrong. I think the current statistic is that over 80% of recorded music on vinyl is unavailable digitally. So crate-digging can expand the musical world you live in quite a bit.

The record in the above picture (click on the arrow for the slideshow) is Outline – Gino Soccio. A really top notch Montreal disco record. It was actually one of  first five records I randomly bought in a thrift store. Man, I was happy when I first heard the slick beat on Dancer. Somehow I felt like this omniscient being who could magically discover dope records. Being able to visually locate the sensibility of an album without any audio information is a big part of crate-digging.

After I bought Soccio’s album, when I was about 1,000 records deep in to my collection, I realized that the album was pretty common. A great album for sure, but not necessarily a spectacular or rare find that I thought I had made. I now have three copies of Outline and a 7” of Dancer. Still, I have a lot of emotions attached to Soccio’s first release.

Any ways, you can listen here to Dancer. A real classic. Thumping.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3y2C8jqG8Q

Other albums selected for this project are:

Extensions of a Man
– Donny Hathaway
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9Uydcm0CgQ

Encounters Of Every Kind – Meco
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kvFGFbA6LI

Sweet honey: in the rock (Self-Titled)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pQW95XPmCY

A Fifth of Beethoven – Walter Murphy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y67xr124DC4

Live Oblivion – Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGa8SCTKXsA

I hope you will come by the CAG and enjoy listening to the above records in person

This is my music + vinyl blog.
http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com/

– Tad Hozumi

__________

Join Tad Hozumi at these upcoming feedback events: 

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE!
Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

 

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‘Crate-digging for Julia Dault’ by Tad Hozumi


The CAG is excited to welcome back Burrard Marina Field House Studio resident Keg de Souza this evening with a screening of her film, If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood… The film, which De Souza created during her artist residency with Kunci Cultural Studies Centre in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, explores the gentrification of a neighbourhood located alongside Yogyakarta’s main river, Kali Code. In the 1970s, the Kampung Ratmakan (neighbourhood) was built by squatters on a graveyard – a characteristic that continues to affect the community living there today. Ghosts are often seen by local residents and the community relies on a local ghost expert to move the ghosts out of their houses. In 2013 the mayor announced plans to develop the area and now the residents, like the ghosts, are beginning to be displaced. In addition to the film, De Souza worked alongside the residents of Kampung Ratmakan to create an inflatable ghost house (pictured above). The interior of the ghost house features embroidered ghost stories created from drawings made by some of the local children during a ghost story workshop.

We hope to see you there!

Screening:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Wednesday, March 18th, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House

Film credits:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Keg de Souza
2014
Duration: 31:45
Single channel HD video, sound, mirrors
Indonesian and Javanese with English subtitles

Interviewees: Pak Kuncung, Ikbal, Pak Antok, Mas Anton, Pak Remi, Budeh Kom, Mbah Endang, Ibu Toko, Ersa, Pak Agus, Sania, Mak Yem.
Translator/ community liaison: Invani Lela Herliana
Sound recordist: Lucas Abela
Original music: Pawang Hantu by Senyawa
Post sound: Timothy Dwyer
Subtitling: Invani Lela Herliana, Rully Shabara

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Keg de Souza – If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…


Hello all! My name is Jas Lally and for the next 10 months I will be working as the Programs Assistant. I am excited to work with Shaun Dacey, Curator of Learning and Public Programs, the staff and volunteers at the CAG. I have been working and volunteering in the arts for the past few years and some of you may have seen me at the Vancouver Art Gallery and Access. I worked a the Vancouver Art Gallery for 5 years in Visitor Services and Administration where  I was able to meet local and international artists. At Access, where I first met  and worked  with Shaun, I was able to work  one-on-one with the Director/Curator and artists. I really enjoyed this more intimate level of work.

My experiences at both galleries solidified my choice in pursing my Masters in the History of Art which I recently completed  at the University of Birmingham, UK. I studied at the Barber Institute of Fine Art  where I co-curated an exhibition on portraiture with the Barber and the National Portrait Gallery. I also completed my dissertation on exhibition practices where I examined why textiles change meaning when exhibited. I was able to use  Lady Barber’s lace collection as my case study. My time at the Barber gave me perspective  and hands on experiences into the multidisciplinary world of curatorial.

My first introduction to the CAG came only three days after starting when I helped set up and greet guests at the CAG’s annual Art Auction. The auction went really well and it was such an exciting way to start a new job! My new role will allow me to help coordinate some interesting learning programs. For example, we recently launched the Telus Garden project, The City in Motion, where 11 young emerging artists are creating an original film to be permanently installed at the new Telus building. Look out for my blog on this project where you can follow along on the progress. I have also started to work with the artist in residence at the Burrard Marina Field House. The CAG recently hosted Fluid Frames: Filmmakers Series with Ben Russell. We hosted a film social at the Field House.

Look back to the CAG’s Blog for exciting updates about what I’m getting up to!

PS: if you haven’t already seen When Sky was Sea by Shimabuku drop by and say hello and sign up to attend one of the talks on the exhibition!

PSS: Did you  hear about our exciting new project in partnership with Ballet BC? and in association with the Art|Basel Crowdfunding Initiative and commissioning artists John Wood and Paul Harrison? to find out more click here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

See you at the CAG soon! – Jas Lally

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Hello from Jas Lally – New Programs Assistant at the CAG


Hello!

My name is Sally, I’m a temporary addition here, volunteering at the CAG, and with my time here hurrying by I wanted to fill you in on how I got here and all the cool stuff I’ve been doing at the CAG.

I’m from the UK and have come to Vancouver for six weeks as part of a four month adventure that has been the most memorable of my life.

My time here is part of a plan that involved leaving all the sensible things in my life, like a job and a flat so that I could stretch my legs over to the West Coast …or I should say, the ‘Best Coast.’

Things took shape after I sent some emails, one to Anchorage Museum in Alaska and the other to the CAG. I have been involved in arts and museum education since University, volunteering or working for different organizations and so I thought it would be brilliant to gain some experience overseas. The reply emails were nerve racking to open but I received, to my delight, welcoming replies. So it was decided and before I knew it I was Alaska bound, looking at the glaciers below wondering what the next four months would bring.

I spent seven weeks in Anchorage, with six of those as a volunteer at the museum getting to develop informal learning activities and facilitate family events. The photo below was taken on my phone in Sitka, onboard a little boat as I looked out for and encountered humpback whales. For me it captures how I feel about my time in Alaska.

After Anchorage I spent a couple of weeks exploring South East Alaska, Seattle and San Francisco before arriving here! My time in Vancouver keeps getting better. At the CAG I have been helping Shaun Dacey and Jas Lally with exciting projects that are teaching me loads. I have been developing learning resources for teachers to accompany the current exhibition, Shimabuku, When Sky Was Sea, helping with the CAGs first Teachers Social as well as the monthly Free Family Day   (I am now an Octopus expert… ask me anything!). I have also had the opportunity to get to know the talented team selected for The City in Motion – CAG/TELUS Garden Public Art project, I’ll have to come back to see the final installation!

I have been supported and welcomed by the CAG team, they have made sure that I eat at yummy places, find the best coffee and of course see loads of exciting art. And so I can’t say thank you enough, I’m sure my last week here will be a brilliant conclusion.

– Sally Page

P.S. Whatever you do! don’t miss the CAG and Ballet BC new partnership, a new dance+art commission with amazing UK artists John Wood and Paul Harrison. To read more click here: http://bit.ly/cagXbbc

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Hello from Sally! – From Anchorage to the Salish Coast


We are so happy to be teamed up with Satellite Gallery and Audain Gallery for the Downtown Gallery Tour series.

Every few months, members from the public are invited to spend a Saturday afternoon on three respective tours of the current exhibitions at Audain Gallery (1pm), Satellite Gallery (2pm) and the Contemporary Art Gallery (3pm).

The most recent incarnation of this series took place on Saturday, November 22nd and the next one will likely be in early 2015. Keep your eyes peeled!

Ellie from Satellite Gallery hosted a mail art workshop with a committed group of local art admirers and artists after the final tour. As a result, this morning we received a whole pile of postcards relating to Shimabuku’s exhibition! Everyone at the CAG greatly enjoyed reading and receiving the cards, as it’s always so rewarding to see what people take away from the exhibitions.

Thank you so much to everyone who came out and to those who created and sent the cards!

This could indeed be the beginning of a beautiful friendship…

– Jaclyn Bruneau

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‘This could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship’…mysterious mail art arrives at the CAG!


All good things must come to an end- and this marks the end of my summer position as Learning and Public Programmes Assistant. I’m honoured and so grateful to have spent the past four months at the Contemporary Art Gallery learning from, and working with, a multitude of talented artists, curators and programmers!

I loved working with Brendan Fernandes this summer, and watching him create his solo performance piece. I learned a lot from his approach to movement, stillness and embodiment and was very happy to participate in the dramaturgical and creation processes. Attending Lee Plested’s seminars, the artist talks and the studio visits affiliated with the CAG’s Night School Program reminded me to think critically about art, what is being presented or discussed, and to consider why the particular artistic choices were made.

Shaun Dacey, the Learning and Public Programs Curator, is such a genuinely interested and forward-looking artist and programmer, that he welcomed any, and all, of my suggestions to be heard and considered over the summer. We were so happy to have been able to participate in Dylan Robinson and Candice Hopkins’ Indigenous Acts Gathering, as we learned and shared with all those involved.

It was a  great summer and I’m sad to see it come to an end! However, I will be back Sunday, September 28th at 3 pm to lead a Guided Visit of Jurgen Partenheimer’s upcoming exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery.  Alors, venir par la galerie le 20 septembre si vous voulez participer à la visite!

Merci Bien, et à bientôt!

Lindsay Lachance

 

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Lindsay Lachance Signing Off!


Last week, I chaired a panel at  The Life and Death of the Arts in Cities after Mega-Events conference co-organized by Simon Fraser University’s Department of English, the University of British Columbia’s Department of Theatre and Film, and the Queen Mary Drama Department, University of London.  The panel was called Art and Activism and I was honoured to have been asked to participate and engage with such an innovative panel and group of conference participants.

The panel consisted of research papers given by Selena Couture, Kirsten Forkert, Heather Sykes and Priya Vadi. The themes of their works focused on questioning the role of Indigenous peoples, lands and culture during the Vancouver, London and Sochi Olympic Games. In their own way, each panelist discussed how the Olympics’ attempts to create a cultural semiotic sign to represent the hosting country- which normally resulted in misappropriating Indigenous knowledges or cultures.  This cartoon image designed for the Vancouver Olympics came up a number of times, click her to see the images: http://billtieleman.blogspot.ca/2009/10/2010-vancouver-winter-olympics-should-i.html

The international conference generated dialogue about the role of the arts in the production of urban mega-events, with a specific comparative focus on both the positive and negative cultural legacies of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games and the London 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games (ACME website). The Arts and Activism panel brought together academics, artists, cultural researchers and urban planners in order to re-consider the impact and relevance that Indigenous peoples and lands hold in such large-scale events.

Thank you to the organizers for inviting me to participate and for the panelists for sharing some innovative and thought provoking works!

– Lindsay Lachance

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The Life and Death of the Arts in Cities after Mega-Events


After an amazing week of talking, sharing, conceptualizing and relationship building- the Indigenous Acts Gathering has come to an end. On Friday, August 8th we hosted the participants at the Contemporary Art Gallery for a chance to share and exchange experiences, and potential “next steps” from their week together. Vancouver-based curators, directors and artists were invited to listen, share and respond to the topics and themes that surfaced over the week.

It was an opportunity for the participants to meet and hear from those involved in Vancouver galleries and urban/artistic planners from around the city and artistic community at large. Dylan Robinson and Candice Hopkins facilitated an engaging and thought provoking closing discussion that allowed for the participates to engage with each other and begin dialogues with the invited guests.

It was an honour to have been able to participate and work through topics that are owed so much attention. I look forward to seeing all of you again, and to continue to learn from your works and teachings!

– Lindsay Lachance

 

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Indigenous Acts: Art and Activism Proposal Sharing


As someone who was born in the early 90’s and grew up as a teenager in the 2000’s, at times I forget what it was like before the age of the computer. While going through the Contemporary Art Gallery’s Auction archives dating back to 1989, it is fascinating to examine all the hand written documents, check lists and auction data transcribed on paper, instead of entered into Excel, Microsoft Word, or Raiser’s Edge.

It is amazing and a privilege to see how much the CAG and the Gala & Auction event has progressed over 25 years. I feel as if I am witnessing and contributing to its overall history and cultural significance – all the artists that have shaped the Vancouver arts scene, who have generously donated work to support a non-profit organization; an institution that strives to give back to the local, national, and international community, both arts and non-arts related.

It is intriguing to think of the initial Gala and Auction at Sophie’s Cosmic Café featuring works of artists who were both emerging and established at that time, and who have continued to significantly contribute to the art world in their own way. There were quite a few names that resurfaced over the 25 year span, as well as iconic names that represent historical transitions in the art world – such as artists of the 60s and 70s, like Mary Kelly and Nam June Paik who both donated work to the CAG’s Auction in 1993.

Nam June Paik was very influential in the art world during the 60s and is arguably considered the founder of video art. Paik and his wife Shigeko Kubota were involved in performance art during the Fluxus/Happening movement in the 60s – a key transition in the art world out of modernism into a postmodern mindset. Mary Kelly’s work is studied for its contribution to the Feminist dialogue that took form in the 70s – her piece, Post-Partum Document (1973-79), challenges the stereotype of pregnancy and what it means to be a mother.

Artists who donated work multiple times that are familiar in the Vancouver context are Landon Mackenzie, Jeff Wall, Ian Wallace, Marian Penner Bancroft, Ken Lum, and others.

The rich history located in the Contemporary Art Gallery’s Auction archives gives a precursor of what will be presented at the Gala & Auction this year, yet another chapter will unfold adding to the constantly evolving dialogue of the art world.

– Olivia de Fleuriot, Development Assistant

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Into the CAG Auction Archives: How It All Began


I’m so honoured to have spent the week attending the Indigenous Acts: Art and Activism Gathering hosted by Dylan Robinson and Candice Hopkins! The Gathering was made up of Round Table Discussions, Sharing Circles, Site Visits, Provocation Discussions and A LOT of delicious meals!

Conversations were held around notions of land, public ceremony, contemporary Indigenous space and how artists are working towards reclaiming traditional space and places. Tania Willard, Raymond Boisjoly, Lorna Brown, Raven Chacon, Mimi Gellman, Duane Linklater, Joar Nango, Peter Morin and Karyn Recollet were some of the participants present for this inspiring and motivating gathering.

All present engaged in critical dialogue to discuss different ways to map space and time, ways to work with protocol and permissions, ways to critically look at borders and the various roles that language plays in these examinations. Re-occurring themes around embodiment, place, space, architecture, sound and identity flowed in and out of the discussions and helped make relations and connects between artists working in different mediums.

On August 5th we shared a dinner at the Burrard Civic Marina Field House. Over the course of the evening the participants wrote quotes, ideas and other kinds of messages to be projected onto the Burrard Bridge. It turned out really well, and generated a lot of laughs! After that we participated in making a light tipi with Cheryl L’Hirondelle. She gave us Sage smodging bundles and a flashlight and guided our bodies to create the structure. The wind played a part in this process as well- sometimes making the structure stronger, and other times blowing our smoke away.

I’m excited to have been able to sit, listen, talk, laugh and share food with those present at this gathering and am eager to see what they will work on next! Chi Meegwetch to all of you for sharing your talent and work with us over the past few days!

– Lindsay Lachance

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Indigenous Acts: Art and Public Space Gathering


That’s me with a little bit of a smirk bidding last year at the annual Contemporary Art Gallery auction.

I’m pretty sure that smirk was a paddle-lifting induced buzz. It’s a natural high — nerve wracking, exhilarating, nauseating, and exciting, all at once, especially when there’s something that really speaks to you. Auctions are fun, and hopefully you’ll join us November 8th for our next one.

If you follow the CAG on Twitter or Facebook, you’ll see there’s all kinds of ways – most of them free! – you can come experience the exhilaration of art. Hanging out with art is a gift, and I’m proud to be able to be a service to the CAG and in some small way help ensure this institution can continue to provide that opportunity to everyone.

It’s meant a lot to my life. Contemporary art has so much to tell us about the world, about our experiences, and how we relate to each other. The wonders of the world and the magic of our complicated relationships to each other and to the current moment.

I can see or experience something that gives me that “a ha” feeling. Where the artist is able to evoke something that maybe has crossed my often too busy brain, but that I was unable to express or quantify. An elegant representation of a feeling or a sense that I wasn’t sure I had. I’ve caught myself at times in galleries silently nodding as this thing that was on the tip of my tongue is represented to me, and there’s a kind of feeling of relief that goes with that. It’s magical to me in those moments.

Almost, dare I say, a place where I experience spirituality – my connection to the bigger we.

Sometimes it might take me to a place of sadness. Social anxiety; human suffering; the loss of love; the struggle with sorrow. Sometimes it’s joyous, or funny. Outrageously ridiculous, or ridiculously outrageous….those moments are the best! I’ve even at times been disgusted by pieces of contemporary art where I’ve walked in and turned around moments later.

But it’s all good as the saying goes…it all matters, it all sticks and swirls around inside and makes some sense of the sometimes chaotic world we live in and that lives in us. It is all worth it for the sense it provides that we are not alone in the universe. That the infinite uniqueness of our experiences can be represented and shared and we have places like the CAG where we can gather to experience, discuss, and celebrate them.

It’s pretty great.

Please keep in touch, and I hope to see you soon at a CAG event.

 

Marcella Munro became President of the Board of the Contemporary Art Gallery on June 19, 2014.

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Marcella Munro, Art is a Gift


This past Saturday, the CAG held its monthly Family Day. Participants crafted landscape collages in response to Kelly Richardson’s Legion. A few of the volunteers and I decided to have a little fun and create our own! From the beginning of my piece’s construction, I had a vague idea of what I wanted my collage to look like. Halfway through, however, I realized it had completely changed as I sorted through the materials we had and gained new inspiration.

Experiencing this process myself got me thinking about the art-making process in general. Artists may start with a certain idea about how they want a piece to look, but the finished product is often very different from the initial plan.

On looking through the CAG exhibition archives, an exhibition in 2010 by artist Elizabeth McIntosh, Violet’s Hair, explicitly seems to address the artistic process. Vancouver based, McIntosh is known for her abstract paintings. When one looks closely at many of her canvasses, faint clues to how the paintings have evolved can be seen. As well as a selection of paintings McIntosh also transformed a gallery room into a collage itself. Colours From a Story (2010) overlaid large, colourful pieces of paper in various sizes creating a sculptural representation of her art-making process. This piece addressed how McIntosh approaches painting; various colours overlapping creating new shapes and the painting itself revealing process and change.

This idea can also be applied to how we view art ourselves. Approaching art that we have never before seen, we often do so with uncertainty. One can never know how the experience will be until we are in front of it and letting our imagination run wild. Sometimes it is useful to wait to read about an exhibition until after you go through it for the first time, allowing yourself to creatively contemplate what it means to you at first glance.

We hope that you will visit us at the CAG for the next family day on Saturday, August, 30 (12-3pm) to enjoy the making and the experience of art.

– Kelli Sturkenboom, Communications intern

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From the Archives | Art-Making & Artistic Process


Burrard Marina Field House Artist in Residence, Brendan Fernandes and Vancouver-based choreographer Justine Chambers led a workshop for the Summer intensive program this week that explored collaboration, conceptualization and authorship. Brendan and Justine are very generous instructors and really encouraged the participants to express themselves through an embodied practice and collaboration.

Justine and Brendan led exercises that brought the participants and their interests together through embodied practice. The participants were asked to write a performance choreography score in five minutes that would have a five minute performance time. After writing their pieces, they put them in the middle and everyone chose someone else’s choreography to perform. We saw people working with their bodies, with the spectators bodies, with the room, with chairs, with shoes… with whatever was in sight! Through this work the participants learned how to conceptualize, create and rehearse a full piece. The group will create their own performance at the end of this program so this work was a great start in helping them learn to share, create and perform ideas.

– Lindsay Lachance

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Conceptualizing and Authorship with Brendan Fernandes and Justine Chambers


Recently Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Brendan Fernandes held a life drawing class at the CAG. The gallery was buzzing with over twenty-five artists and the model, Rachel Meyer, a member of Ballet BC. Fernandes worked with Rachel to create a multitude of poses on various sized plinths that highlighted her feet and encouraged participants to focus on this area.

The drawing tasks varied from 30 seconds to 5 minutes then 20 minutes poses. It was really amazing to see the range of differences in drawing style and form that everyone used to interpret Rachel’s poses. We got great feedback from the participants and we’re hoping to hold more life drawing classes at the CAG in the future.

Check out some of these amazing life drawings above and stay tuned to find out more about Brendan Fernandes residency!

– Lindsay La Chance

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Life Drawing with Brendan Fernandes: Seeing the Dancer’s Foot


As the new Development Assistant for the Contemporary Art Gallery’s 26th Annual Gala & Auction, I am so excited to be a part of the CAG’s team and to connect with the CAG’s surrounding community.

My name is Olivia de Fleuriot de la Coliniere – I usually shorten my last name to de Fleuriot to avoid confusion or bewilderment. I was born in Durban, South Africa and moved to Toronto with my family when I was five years old. I grew up amongst creativity and colour, which encourages me to pursue my passion to create and study fine art. I recently completed my Bachelor of Art degree, majoring in Art + Design, at Trinity Western University and will be continuing this upcoming academic year as an Honours student. I aspire to pursue a career in a gallery setting and educational environment, as well as my own artistic practice.

The team here, at the CAG, has been welcoming and supportive. I work directly with Sue Lavitt, Head of Development and Communication, and also other staff and volunteers at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

It has been an exciting adventure corresponding, researching, and writing about the various artists being presented at the gala fundraiser this year. I can’t wait for you to experience the fantastic night and participate by supporting both the artists and the CAG in their role locally, nationally, and internationally. It is very tempting to blurt out the broad display of talent being presented this year, but I shall keep you in suspense a bit longer!

I am quite happy to say that my experience here at the Contemporary Art Gallery does not end this August. Before my current position, I volunteered and assisted Shaun Dacey, the Curator of Learning and Public Programs, with research and educational practices. From this experience I will be co leading the Family Day events that take place the last Saturday of every month. It would be great to see you at a Family Day event or at the Annual Gala & Auction this fall!

There will be more blogs coming up to give you a taste of this year’s Gala & Auction in retrospective of a 25 year history.

– Olivia de Fleuriot

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Hello from Olivia de Fleuriot!


As I mentioned in my National Aboriginal Day post I headed down to the Trout Lake Community Center to experience and participate in the fun! It was a beautiful sunny Saturday where everyone was enjoying the weather, the food, the company and the performances!

We attended the performance of Songs for Reconciliation,a part of  William Hiłamas Edward Wasden Jr‘s  residency with  The Vancouver Park Board.  Wasden Jr brought Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples together to learn, share and perform Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw cultural stories, songs and dances. The project focused on revisiting cultural histories and knowledges that emphasize the importance of creating and maintaining loving relationships within families and especially towards children. William shares cultural knowledges and histories so that the participants and the audience can reflect on the many cultural elements that have been suppressed due to the residential  school systems.

We heard songs for young boys learning to hunt, songs for infant and toddlers, and one called the duck song. The audience was encouraged to participate and sometimes the dancers would  take you by the hand to get up and dance with them!

Another part of the project allowed for the participants to make their own regalia. Each piece was handmade, generally in black or red and had an animal on the back.

This collaborative residency allowed for Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities to learn, remember, and share in Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw cultural knowledges and stories. As an Anishnaabe person I was honoured to be there, and to have shared in the performance of this work!

Meegwetch (Thank you)  William for initiating this project and for sharing your stories, songs and dances with us!

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William Wasden Jr: City of Vancouver Artist in Residence Performance


Wine & cheese boards — engaging critical & theoretical discussions about contemporary art in Vancouver — where do I sign up?!

Night School is a new intensive program  for anyone interested in broadening their understanding of contemporary art. Facilitated by independent curator Lee Plested, participants engage in seminars, studio visits and special events in order to unpack the concepts and thematics of contemporary practice via the history of CAG exhibitions.

Lee Plested is an engaging and charming lecturer who encourages group discussion from those in attendance. At last Thursday night’s seminar Plested introduced works by Stan DouglasRebecca Belmore, Nan Goldin and Stephen Waddell. He clearly articulates the social, political and historical themes particular to each artist. He then initiates critical discourse forming relationships between each. The round table format is very inviting and allows for insightful critical dialogue.

In addition to studio visits and talks, Night School participants will attend exhibition openings and other arts and culture events across the city! This is an amazing initiative that introduces its students to the multiple ways in which conversations regarding the philosophical, aesthetic, socio-political and creation processes of contemporary art can be articulated and received. The CAG is currently planning a second session of Night School in early 2015. This is something you won’t want to miss so stay tuned for more information regarding registration and programming!

– Lindsay Lachance

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Night School at the CAG: Teaching us to say what we mean & mean what we say


A Vancouver Draw Down report…

On Saturday June 14 I spent the afternoon at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station with CAG Development Assistant, Olivia and CAG volunteer, Alex as a part of Vancouver Draw Down: the annual city-wide event that invites Vancouverites of all ages to take part in various drawing activities.

The CAG’s contribution to the day-long event was Boulevard Station a drawing workshop that saw participants trace over the top of Marian Penner Bancroft’s installation Boulevard  at the Canada Line’s Yaletown-Roundhouse Station.

Boulevard, a work of mirrored and kaleidoscoped Golden Elms and Sequoias trees, was a perfect venue for our tracing activity. All afternoon we traced different areas of Bancroft’s mural with charcoal, conte, pencils, markers or whatever else people wanted to work with! We got some amazing, creative and beautiful images! Even if the same spot was retraced, they still turned out looking unique and captivating. After each trace was finished we added them to a piece of plywood and created our own hybrid kaleidoscope community tree. It was amazing to see all the different styles, colours and lines that make up one abstract tree, see above for pics from the day and of the drawings made.

We had a great time and I can’t wait to be a part of more public program events at the CAG!

 

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Rounding up Yaletown at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station for Draw Down


On Thursday, December 12th, the Point Grey Secondary grade twelve, Art Careers class visited the Contemporary Art Gallery for a full day workshop. 

They spent the day exploring James Welling’s exhibition The Mind On Fire with a focus on studying curatorial practice and conceptual art practices.  As part of the investigation they undertook an experiential response to Welling’s working methods, by conducting a photo-shoot in which students were asked to explore in-camera abstraction techniques. They spent their lunch hours creating images while exploring downtown Vancouver. 

The students were interested in questioning our assumptions of perception and the photographic image, as well as how the inherent ambiguity affected the reading of an image. The students met afterward to discuss and edit the images and categorize them based on the abstraction technique or subject matter of the photographs.  In effect the students curated an exhibition of photography, taking a cue from Welling in grouping images based on intended effect.

The CAG is excited to present a selection images of their work, see above for a slide show. A big thank you to the whole Point Grey HS  Art Careers class and the artists we are presenting here: Kiel Torres, Catherine Wang, Cosette Bote, Aly Slobadov, Nancy Tseng, Forever Young, Kevin McAllum. They’ve posted more images on their Point Grey Art Blog.

The CAG welcome groups of all ages and levels for free guided visits. We also produce guided visits with art-making responses to the exhibitions on display.

Contact s.dacey@contemporaryartgallery.ca for more information.

– Shaun Dacey, Curator of Learning and Public Programs

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Brains ‘A’ flame: Point Grey High School’s response to James Welling’s “Mind on Fire”


Fresh in town from originally Windsor, via Montreal, Justin Langlois gave a talk at the Burrard Marina Field House about his ideas and his work on Saturday, August 17th. He brought with him a pamphlet of thought-provoking slices of his personal and artistic philosophy, which he flipped through over the duration of the talk as a prompt for further musings and discussion. He’s happy to share it with us in the images above, along with a video he made titled ‘Windsor is Forever’.

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Limits & Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life – by Justin Langlois


On Monday, October 7th we attended a potluck get-together for everyone involved in the City of Vancouver’s Field House Residence Program at Roundhouse Community Centre. There were heaping plates of kale, rice, beans and hummus, mini glasses of wine, and three hours worth of interesting presentations about what each group of artists are doing to make the most of their unique locations.

One of my favourites was the Loco Moto Art Collective, located in the Aberthau Mansion at West Point Grey Community Centre. Spearheaded by Laura Lee Coles but including around 20 others, the group works  broadly in the realm of digital media, eco-aesthetics, and the relationships between humans, technology and nature. They are the newest Field House to have set-up shop, and they’ve already hosted a few events indoors and outdoors. They seem to have lots of wild and wonderful things coming up for the new year. They’ll be launching a new exhibition called No Memes No at Hot Art Wet City at 2206 Main Street on the spookiest day of the year–October 31st.

Another group that piqued my interest was Cloudscape Comics. They’re located at 5955 Ross Street inside the Memorial Park South Field House. The 30 of them approach the production of comics from different backgrounds, which makes their oeuvre very dynamic. There’s something for everyone and they release an anthology of comics every year. They recently posted a call-out for submissions with Sci-Fi/Fantasy comics with queer characters and themes. They offer a free drop-in comic jam every Wednesday starting at 7:30pm at their Field House.

And these are only a few examples of the 50 artists who are enlivening 13 spaces in parks around the city. It was awesome to hear about the ways that other artists are negotiating the best use of their spaces, and it’ll be great to keep an eye on all these projects that are largely community oriented and site specific.

– Jaclyn

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Field House Meet-up Day


Nathan Crompton gave a lecture and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field House on Saturday, September 28th. We asked him a few questions in preparation for the event, and are now bringing you the second half of the session (the first part can be found here). We’re grateful for the insight and perspective that Nathan brings to this crucial and ever-timely subject matter and look forward to further expanding this dialogue with him and the community.

JB: For people who may not understand the complexity of the power relations embedded in gentrification and may therefore see neighbourhood improvement as simply that, how would you explain to them that the “polishing up” comes at a high cost to a basic, and long-compromised human right—especially for the (large) indigenous population of the area?

NC: That’s a difficult question. I might only be able to point to a contradiction. Currently our neoliberal cities are crumbling before our eyes, with the massive de-funding of basic services both in terms of the human and architectural infrastructure. I’m talking about an entire generation of infrastructure left behind by the welfare state, whether it’s Simon Fraser University, Heather Place or Little Mountain – they’re all in shambles as the war on the poor and working class intensifies. Social democracy, with all of its flaws and compromises – particularly its framework of patriarchal white supremacy – has now been replaced by neoliberalism.

Neoliberal urbanism states that improvements to the city can only be supported if they are funded privately, first by private capital and secondly by the retroactive bonuses, tax cuts and fee exemptions created by the municipal colonial state. Since being elected, Vision Vancouver has taken this model to its highest possible level, setting in motion an entire bureaucracy whose sole purpose is to move social funds upwards, particularly (but not exclusively) for the monopoly developers who fund the political apparatus. So the axiom of our generation is revitalization and improvements, yes, but the precondition is that these improvements only for those who can afford it, under the guise of urban revitalization. It is therefore hard today to discuss urban improvements in an abstract way, detached from class and colonialism. Who is benefitting from revitalization, who is losing out? Does it always have to be the propertied class who determine what is the “highest and best use”? Real-estate knows how to follow through on a process of colonization to gain returns on value, but can we respond with a new affirmation of value, independent from capitalist accumulation and the displacement of our communities? Those are some of the questions we’ve been asking.

JB: The pro-development side seems to argue that gentrification is justified by the fact that the residents in the DTES of today are not in a position to pay the requisite costs to live in a neighbourhood whose real estate potential is exorbitant. What they fail to realize is that the neighbourhood functions as a community and refuge for people who have largely been displaced and dispossessed previously—in some cases several times, by the same system that is trying to again remove them. How can we conceive of a way to bridge this gap between seeing a neighbourhood as dollar signs and seeing a neighbourhood as inhabited by a vulnerable population with a strong existing community?

NC: The events of Reconciliation are coming to a close here in Vancouver. Yesterday Vancouver City Council also apologized to the Japanese community for its motion in 1942 supporting the expulsion and internment of Japanese Canadians during the war. Now is a good time to ask, reflectively, if we want to continue repeating the mistakes of the past. Grace Eiko Thomson told city council that apologies and reconciliation mean nothing in the context of accelerating displacement and dispossession.

“For me, an apology is not enough unless it is followed up. Not for us, it’s too late for us. Most of us are gone. Most of us who experienced the internment are gone. It is so important we remember that what happened to us can happen to others. That is why I raise the Downtown Eastside because that is where we used to live. That is where we were displaced from. And the original people were the Coast Salish first nations who were originally displaced.

She continued: “For me, I really feel we have to be vigilant about other people who are still living in this area at the moment who are still socially and economically being excluded, particularly with this big talk about gentrification. The developers are moving in, the price of land is going up. So what does this mean for the people that are living there? Does that mean they are going to be displaced again? I hope not. This is the most important thing to me right now, that this doesn’t happen to another group of people. This is a unique community with a unique history and there are still people living here who may be displaced depending on how the city decided to act on this area…”

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Nathan Crompton Interview (Part 2 of 2)


I think we should all be restless in where we are — not towards accumulation, but towards an urgency in wanting to better understand the world around us.”
— Justin Langlois

Justin Langlois has recently moved to Vancouver from Windsor, Ontario. He’ll be joining the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design this Fall, and the CAG invited him to speak about his practice at the Burrard Marina Fieldhouse on Saturday, August 17th. He is co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an “artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore and unfold curiosities around locality, infrastructures, and creative practice leading towards civic change,” and he had lots to share about his background, but more so, his present and future.

He has developed his own brand of social rehabilitation in post-Fordist Windsor—a place which he believes is useful to think about in terms of potential opportunities, rather than as plagued by crisis. For Langlois, his entry into art was not one rooted in a studio practice, but instead in artistic efforts that mobilize several artists and ideas—like organizing rock shows, or producing a 200-copy newspaper. It seems inevitable that his small-town upbringing can be cited as an enabler for his enlightened sense of engagement and facilitation.

He touched on some key areas of the organization’s operational pedagogy and flipped through a small pamphlet (click here to view the pamphlet), sharing each page one-by-one. Each page expressed a carefully crafted opinion or idea that followed suit with its title, Limits and Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life—a title originating from Langlois’ belief that it is easier to begin acting and creating within a defined area, instead of trying to wrangle with infinity. He talked about the necessity to re-think the words and terms that we have come to establish meanings for which are insufficient; things like social change, engagement, public participation, and education. He encouraged the audience to consider each point to act as an entry from which a larger conversation could develop, and people responded at the end with thoughtful and sincere rebuttals. It’s only a matter of time ‘til we see what kinds of projects Langlois brings to life in Vancouver.

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Artists in Public | Justin Langlois Talk


Another sunny Saturday brought lots of folks ’round for our 3rd and final Family Day of this summer season. Ros offered a step-by-step demo of how to create functional pinwheels of all shapes and sizes. There were lots of different papers, from patterned origami to neon construction, and some sparkly pipe cleaners to add that final zing. Thanks to everyone who came out for our Family Day series this summer and we hope to see you all soon.

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Family Day – Pinwheel Making at the Field House


Collaborators, Catherine Grau and Zoe Kreye met while attending the MFA program in Public Art and New Artistic Strategies at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany. It was here that the conceptual basis for their artistic practice was born. Along with a group of about 15 others’ recently spent an afternoon with them at the Burrard Marina Field House. While sitting on the Field House lawn overlooking a view of hundreds of boats, they gave a full overview of their most recent project, Unlearning Weekenders.

Over the duration of the talk, we were introduced to the notion of ‘unlearning’. Grau and Kreye shared texts and theories that influenced them in the development of their project and their own approach to ‘unlearning’. Through their ideas they sought to reassess, deconstruct, look within, or question the things considered to be ‘given’ in our culture.

They spoke of the desire to imagine and make gestures toward decolonizing and deinstitutionalizing today’s monochromatic educational and economic systems. They discussed the ways our current systems fail to address individuals, our hominal wants and needs; how they divide us from our bodies and how they prevent us from knowing ourselves in a way unobstructed by the dogmas that tell us how to be. Zoe illustrated this by mentioning that in every level of our education and work (middle school, high school, post-secondary, professionalism) we involve our bodies increasingly less.

Responding to these ideas, Grau and Kreye’s research led them to forms of physical movement and dance in an ‘attempt to replenish themselves’ from the rigor of both creating and giving.

Throughout the talk the artists shared their experiences, including, developing a 12-hour procession through the city with various local community groups and individuals. Numerous activities occurred through this procession, including: a stick-listening event at Third beach; a backwards walking procession underneath Canada Place; walking across Burrard Bridge all tied to each other and burying themselves in the sand while listening to one participant reading Some Thoughts on the Common Toad by George Orwell.

A good portion of the audience were participants in the weekend procession (hence the Weekenders part of the title). Their presence enriched the discussion with meaningful reflections, questions and contemplations. The artists were receptive and enthusiastic about the insights, and seemed to be mentally banking them for future consideration as they move forward.

I left full of appreciation, excitement and hope about the process of inquiry and making earnest attempts to cultivate a kind of purity of the self. Throughout the talk, I realized their work could not be separate from who they are, their research and the way it feeds into their art, is about shedding the cultural sludge that becomes attached to us. This was epitomized by their relaxed attitude to the occasional sound of planes overhead. They simply paused and waited for it to pass.

For more information on the project, check out their website.

This artist talk was the first of many that will take place at the Field House. We’ll be hosting Family Days on Saturday July 27 and August 24, 1-4 pm. If you want to make sure not to miss anything, keep an eye on our Twitter, Facebook, and get on the mailing list (scroll to the bottom right on the page) to receive our updates.

– Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver.

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Field House Update: Unlearning Weekenders Artist Talk – Catherine Grau & Zoe Kreye


Today, the CAG (and people across Canada) celebrate Nunavut Day, a day that commemorates the NLCA (the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement). The NLCA is the largest comprehensive claim settlement in Canada, and it marked the first time that the Canadian map has changed since 1949 (with the incorporation of Newfoundland and Labrador).

Nunavut Day is a day to celebrate arctic traditions and the northern way of life. As our current exhibition features Inuit artist Itee Pootoogook, we invite anyone interested in celebrating Nunavut Day in Vancouver to join us and experience his work.

While you might seek out Wikipediato learn more about Nunavut today, the listing doesn’t say much about their fine arts scene. There has been an accelerated change in artistic expression in the past 50 years as many modern Inuit artists react to the present and the wider, more accessible world. Today’s northern nunavut artist is not as isolated, and the work produced is more contemporary, but no less representative.

If you are unable to make it today to the gallery, be sure to visit us on our forthcoming English, French, and Spanish tours of the current CAG exhibitions.

As I was researching more about Nunavut Day, I learned that while the official languages of Nunavut are English and French, 8% of the population speaks neither English, French, nor Inuktitut (the primary language of Nunavut). Unfortunately, my language skills are limited to English and French, so to those remaining 8%, I say: Nunavut Quviahugvik (Happy Times Nunavut in Inuinnagtun!)

***

Aujourd’hui, le CAG (et les personnes à travers le Canada) célèbrent la journée Nunavut qui commémore l’ARTN (Accord sur les revendications territoriales du Nunavut). L’Accord est le plus important règlement de revendications territoriales au Canada, et il a marqué la première fois que le plan canadien a changé depuis 1949 (avec l’incorporation de Terre-Neuve et Labrador).

La journée du Nunavut est une journée pour célébrer les traditions arctiques et la vie nordique. Comme notre exposition actuelle présente l’artiste inuit Itee Pootoogook, nous vous invitons à célébrer la journée du Nunavut à Vancouver avec nous et à découvrir son travail.

Alors que vous pourriez rechercher Wikipedia pour en savoir plus au sujet du Nunavut aujourd’hui, l’article ne dit pas beaucoup à propos de leur beaux-arts. Il y a eu un changement accéléré dans les expressions artistiques dans les 50 dernières années et nombreux artistes inuits modernes réagissent à l’actualité et à le monde plus accessible. Ces artistes d’aujourd’hui n’est pas aussi isolé, et le travail qu’ils produisent est plus contemporain, mais non moins introspective.

Si vous n’arrivez pas à venir aujourd’hui à la galerie, n’hésitez pas à nous rendre visite à nos visites guidées à venir en anglais, français, et espagnol de les expositions au CAG.

Comme je faisais des recherches au sujet de la journée du Nunavut, j’ai appris que même si ses langues officielles sont l’anglais et le français, 8% de la population ne parle ni anglais, ni français, ni l’inuktitut (la langue principale parlé au Nunavut). Malheureusement, mes compétences linguistiques sont limitées à l’anglais et le français (rouillée), donc à ceux qui tombent au 8%, je dis: Nunavut Quviahugvik (temps heureux Nunavut!)

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Happy Nunavut Day | Joyeuse journée du Nunavut


Hello one and all,

I’m Jaclyn Bruneau, the CAG Field House intern currently working with Raymond Boisjoly during his summer artist-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. I’ll be keeping people in the loop about his activities, and with Field House events by reporting in this blog. Look for posts with the ‘Field House Studio’ blog category and keep your dials tuned in.

A few Saturdays ago, Raymond and I spent the afternoon at False Creek Community Centre where he led a workshop as part of the Vancouver Draw Down, that very cool single-day drawing festival that invites Vancouverites to access various types of drawing workshops for free, held in over 23 locations city wide. The workshop was titled Re-Inventing Drawing and began invitingly with tables scattered with pipe cleaners, masking tape, paper cups, tree branches, string, scissors, pieces of paper big and small, and a ton of markers all of which were used together or separately to create fantastically experimental gestural marks on paper.

Our first two visitors were a pair of twins named Alex and Liam, who seemed to have made use of all the materials. They taped felts all around the parameter of the paper cup; strung together branches, attaching a pen on each end and then twirling the contraption above paper; and stuck felts through holes in foamy paper. Their mom seemed blown away at all the things they came up with. Some others made contraptions with the branches that allowed two people to each take hold of a part of the branch, and proceed to see if they could collaboratively render an image they thought up together beforehand. Raymond even drew my attention to a mystery visitor who got carried away with their new tools on the hardwood floor (oops!). Above are some photos from the workshop.

During the afternoon’s workshop the space was flooded with natural light and we left the doors wide open, so people walking the path outside could peek in and join. We met daughters and dads, kids in strollers, couples, best friends, and even a few grandparents. It was amazing how little instruction everyone needed. They seemed full of ideas, and were very eager–especially those itching to fill their Draw Down passports with stamps. I floated around taking photos and getting people started. Raymond seemed to know exactly what to say in the way of inspiration for those stuck for an idea.

– Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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News from the Field House & fun with Draw Down!


New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées

Did you know that there is a free guided visit at the CAG almost every week during an exhibition? | Savez-vous qu’il y a une visite guidée chez la galerie d’art contemporain presque chaque semaine au cours d’une exhibition? (lisez ce poste en français).

The CAG team has worked very hard to ensure that guided tours are scheduled regularly throughout the course of our exhibitions, and that dedication has given recently given birth to a new series of tours starting this month: multi-language guided visits. For the first time ever, our guided visits are now offered in Mandarin and Spanish!

I have been proud to present our guided visits in French for the past 3 exhibitions, taking over from artist Patricia Huijnen following her return to Switzerland last year. It’s been a real pleasure for me, as I love the French language and often lament that I do not have the chance to speak it as much as I would like. I also love talking about art, and the opportunity to do so at the Contemporary Art Gallery is both challenging and satisfying. Contemporary art can be difficult to understand at first glance, and bringing context, new ideas, and new ways of thinking to visitors has been, for me, an incredibly rewarding privilege.

When I was in school, it was always a struggle to fully appreciated fine-arts field trips when the exhibitions weren’t being presented in the language in which we were being instructed. My teachers would be diligently providing us with French vocabulary and tools with which to engage with the art, but when it was time to visit a gallery, museum or event, it was often jarring to listen to tours in English. There was something really special about the tours that were offered in French.

When Shaun Dacey, our new Curator of Learning and Public Programs, joined the CAG team in April, I wrote to him to tell him about how much I loved working in French at the CAG. Imagine my delight, when he not only echoed my enthusiasm, but informed me that he was already working to add additional language tours to the schedule.

Tommy Ting hosts CAG guided tours in MandarinI attended the Mandarin tour, hosted by artist Tommy Ting, on Saturday the 18th, and was delighted to see the engagement in our visitor’s faces while they discussed and engaged with the work in their own language. While I was unable to make the following week’s tour, hosted by photographer Avelina Crespo, I have been told it was well attended and equally well received. Both Tommy and Avelina have agreed to join us again later this summer to again present Mandarin and Spanish language tours at our upcoming exhibition.

I am truly proud to be part of the team providing multi-language tours at the CAG. I invite you to join me on June 1st at 3PM for my guided visit, in French, of the Nancy Holt/Erin Shirreff exhibition currently on display at the CAG.

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a Vancouver illustrator, and proud volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

♦ ♦ ♦

L’équipe à la galerie a beaucoup travaillé pour s’assurer que les visites guidées sont programmées régulièrement tout au long de nos expositions, et ce dévouement a donné récemment naissance à une nouvelle série de visites ce mois-ci: des visites guidées multilingues! Pour la première fois, nos visites guidées sont maintenant offerts en mandarin et en espagnol!

Je suis fière d’avoir organisée nos visites guidées en français pour les dernières 3 expositions, succédant à l’artiste Patricia Huijnen après son retour en Suisse l’année dernière. Cela a été un réel plaisir pour moi, comme je suis amoureuse de la langue française et se plaignent souvent que je n’ai pas la chance de parler (ou d’écrire) en français autant que je le voudrais. J’aime aussi parler de l’art, et l’opportunité de le faire à la galerie d’art contemporain est à la fois stimulante et satisfaisante. L’art contemporain peut être difficile à comprendre au premier vu, et apportant le contexte, des nouvelles idées, et de nouvelles façons de penser à nos visiteurs est, pour moi, un privilège extrêmement enrichissante.

Kay Slater mène une visite guidée en français du travail de Nathan Coley.

Mon français est devenu assez rouiller après avoir pas eu la chance de l’utiliser quotidiennement, mais j’espère que mon passion pour l’art et pour la langue le compense.

Tommy Ting leads a guided tour in Mandarin at the CAG. 18 Mai, 2013Quand j’étais à l’école, c’était toujours difficile d’apprécier des excursions beaux-arts lorsque les expositions n’ont pas été présentées dans la langue dans laquelle nous étions instruits. Nos enseignants seraient diligents en nous fournir le vocabulaire et des outils pour s’engager avec l’art, mais quand il était temps de visiter une galerie, une musée ou un événement, il était souvent choquant à entendre des visites guidées en anglais. Il y avait quelque chose de vraiment spécial dans les visites qui ont été offerts en français; c’était peut-être simplement parce qu’ils étaient si rares, mais peut-être c’était également comment facile c’était à comprendre et à apprécier ces œuvres.

Quand Shaun Dacey, notre nouveau curateur de l’apprentissage et des programmes publiques, a rejoint l’équipe CAG en Avril, je lui ai écrit pour lui dire combien j’adore travailler en français au CAG. Imaginez ma joie, quand il a non seulement fait écho à mon enthousiasme, mais m’a informé qu’il travaillait déjà à ajouter d’autres visites en plusieurs langues à l’horaire.

J’ai participé à la première visite guidée en mandarine, organisée par l’artiste Tommy Ting, et j’ai été ravi de voir l’engagement dans les visages de nos visiteurs pendant qu’ils ont eu la chance de discuter et de s’engager avec le travail dans leur propre langue. Tandis que je n’ai pas pu participer à la visite guidée en espagnol la semaine suivante, organisée par le photographe Avelina Crespo, on m’a dit qu’il a été bien fréquenté et tout aussi bien accueilli. Tommy et Avelina ont accepté de nous rejoindre cet été pour présenter à nouveau des visites en mandarin et en espagnol à propos de notre prochaine exposition.

Je suis vraiment fière de faire partie de l’équipe offrant des visites multilingues à la CAG. Je vous invite à me rejoindre le 1er Juin à 15 heures pour ma visite guidée, en français, de l’exposition Nancy Holt / Erin Shirreff présentement exposée au CAG.

 

Kay Slater (@ kdot) est une illustratrice de Vancouver, et bénévole à la Galerie d’Art Contemporain. Venez la rendre visite tous les dimanches de midi à 15 heures.

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New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées


Last Saturday was Vancouver Draw Down. The event took place in multiple locations all over town and it was great day. I hope you had a chance to get out and participate in some of the stations set up around the city. I managed to take in 6 of the 18 locations and one of my stops was naturally the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Artist and Educator, Landon Mackenzie, transformed the gallery’s street front, foyer & hallways into a “Map Room.” Based on her work, Landon invited everyone to explore the “many potentials of drawing and mapping as an act and state of being.”

The place was packed when I arrived. Every table was covered with works in progress as visitors created collages from pieces of topographical print-outs.

When visitors were done they were invited to sketch the Monahan pieces in the BC Binning Gallery, examining form and mark making.

This was the 3rd year for Vancouver Draw Down and I can’t wait for the next. The event celebrated drawing and invited everyone to participate by simply making a mark. As the Vancouver Draw Down site says “If you can write your name, you can draw!”

I saw another great quote posted by Opus Art Supplies encouraging people to dispell their preconceptions: “If you hear a voice within you say – you cannot paint, then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced.” van Gogh

The same goes with drawing!

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

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Vancouver Draw Down: the Map Room.


The days are getting shorter, the nights are getting colder, the meals heartier, and the urge to stay in bed more persistent. Luckily there’s a great reason to get dolled up and hit the town! The CAG Annual Gala Dinner and Art Auction is less than a week away, and what better way to spend an otherwise dull November Saturday than supporting the Contemporary Art Gallery and the artists they exhibit!

The date is November 5th, and the festivities begin at 6:30pm at the new Hotel Georgia.
Tickets are still available, $250 ($225 for members), $2250 for a table of ten.

You can check out the great artworks here.

Happy bidding!

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So close you can almost touch it!


Our 22nd Annual Auction on Saturday was a tremendous success, and a fun night. Thank you to all the participating artists, our hardworking volunteers and to our sponsors that helped make it all happen.

For those of you that weren’t able to attend the auction in person, here is a sample of a performance that Paul Daykin treated us to live.

Video: Matt Smith

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Auction sketching


The excitement is building at the CAG this afternoon as something special has just landed on our desks…

As some of you maybe aware Vancouver artist Elizabeth Zvonar has been commissioned to create the special gift for this year’s auction and the first batch has just arrived.

Here’s a sneak peak, but of course we can’t show you everything!  To see what’s inside you will have to wait till the night, so if you haven’t bought or reserved your tickets, now is the time!

Invest your inner ‘feelings’ at the 22ndAnnual Art Auction and Gala Dinner,

Sat Nov 6 at The Vancouver Club.

find out more here

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A Call To Auction


$375.00

Published:
pages

youngpatronscrop.111807

Night School IV

March 16 - May 15, 2016
10 sessions

$375
(payment can also be made monthly)

Includes a complimentary CAG membership
Space is limited with only 20 seats available for this semester.

Night School is a program for new collectors and contemporary art enthusiasts, an introductory contemporary art survey that is intentionally accessible, intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Lectures by instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world. A suggested reading list will complement the discussion program. Along with the lectures, the participants will also engage in three studio visits with internationally recognized local artists including: Vikky Alexander, Gareth Moore, Elizabeth McIntosh, and tours of exhibitions by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun - Unceded Territories at the Museum of Anthropology and upcoming exhibition, MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Wednesday March 16

Lecture 1 - The French Salon

Sunday March 20 

Studio Visit 1 with Vikky Alexander

Wednesday March 23

Lecture 2 - Matter Is Meaning

March 23 - April 2

Easter Reading Week Break (no session)

Sunday April 3

Exhibition Visit - MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture @ VAG

Sunday April 10

Studio Visit 2 with Elizabeth McIntosh

Wednesday April 13

Lecture 3 - Absorbing Abstractions

Sunday April 24

Studio Visit 3 with Gareth Moore

Wednesday April 27

Lecture 4 - Surrealism and Other Truths

Friday May 6

Exhibition preview for Jochen Lempert

Sunday May 15

Exhibition Tour - Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun @ MOA

 

Cost: $375, includes a complimentary CAG membership.

Space is limited - 20 seats

To register contact Kristin Cheung, Development Officer

at k.cheung@contemporaryartgallery.ca or call 604 681 2700.

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Night School IV


$15.00

Published: 11/2010
52 pages

Published on the occasion of the exhibition Kim Beom - Objects Being Taught They Are Nothing But Tools, Nov 14, 2010 to March 6, 2011 at the Cleveland Art Museum, USA. Includes an essay by Paola Morsiani.

"With an expressive vocabulary that relies on deadpan humor, absurdist enunciation, poetry and childlike imagery, the art of Kim Beom investigates our perception of the world by bringing reality and imagination closer together. Kim Beom: Objects Being Taught They Are Nothing But Tools, continues a tradition at The Cleveland Museum of Art of organizing small-scale monographic exhibitions on the art of living artists whose work has come to maturity. This book is a monograph of that exhibition."

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Kim Beom - Objects Being Taught They Are Nothing But Tools


$200.00

Published: 07/2015
1 pages

Mungo Thomson
Negative Space (STScI-PRC2012-26f), 2015
Archival inkjet print
Edition of 20, signed.

The print is available mounted or unmounted, if shipping is requested we will contact you to specify whether you prefer it mailed mounted or unmounted.

This limited edition print was produced to coincide with the exhibition Mungo Thomson: Time, People, Money, Crickets at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver July 10 to August 30, 2015.

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Mungo Thomson - Negative Space (STScI-PRC2012-26f)


$40.00

Published:
pages

Published by JRP|Ringier
Text by Mungo Thomson, Michael Webster.

Crickets is a collaboration between Californian artist Mungo Thomson (born 1969) and composer Michael Webster (born 1966), for which field recordings of crickets from around the world were transcribed into a musical score, including parts for violin, flute, clarinet and percussion. This publication documents their project.

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Mungo Thomson - Crickets


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