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Behind the Scenes

Y-CAG

New Y-CAG starts in November – still time to sign up!

Program Runs – Two Wednesdays each month from November, 2013 – May, 2014
Cost – $350

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Information Sheet

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Application Form

Y-CAG offers youth interested in contemporary art, visual culture and exhibition-making the opportunity to work closely with leading artists, curators, gallery staff and educators. Co-hosted by the Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Y-CAG will offer a behind-the-scenes look into both institutions, through gallery and facility visits.

Students will engage in discussions focusing on contemporary cultural issues; participate in the production of publications, events and presentations; and gain experience producing, installing and documenting artwork. Work produced in the program will culminate in a student-initiated ‘exhibition in print’.

  • Meet bi-weekly and build relationships with other creative teens, Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design staff, and visiting museum professionals and artists;
  • Identify interests and questions and use these to explore art through a variety of means, from looking, researching, and discussing to art making;
  • Place contemporary art within the context of what is going on in the larger world; and
  • Work with a variety of people and teen peers to create a public art exhibition or event.

Cost

The cost of the program is $350 for the entire six months and includes refreshments at each session.

Schedule

Teens will meet twice a month from 4:00 – 7:00 PM two Wednesdays of every month for afterschool meetings facilitated by educators and art professionals. Meetings will alternate between the CAG and Emily Carr.

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Y-CAG Program with ECUAD


That’s me with a little bit of a smirk bidding last year at the annual Contemporary Art Gallery auction.

I’m pretty sure that smirk was a paddle-lifting induced buzz. It’s a natural high — nerve wracking, exhilarating, nauseating, and exciting, all at once, especially when there’s something that really speaks to you. Auctions are fun, and hopefully you’ll join us November 8th for our next one.

If you follow the CAG on Twitter or Facebook, you’ll see there’s all kinds of ways – most of them free! – you can come experience the exhilaration of art. Hanging out with art is a gift, and I’m proud to be able to be a service to the CAG and in some small way help ensure this institution can continue to provide that opportunity to everyone.

It’s meant a lot to my life. Contemporary art has so much to tell us about the world, about our experiences, and how we relate to each other. The wonders of the world and the magic of our complicated relationships to each other and to the current moment.

I can see or experience something that gives me that “a ha” feeling. Where the artist is able to evoke something that maybe has crossed my often too busy brain, but that I was unable to express or quantify. An elegant representation of a feeling or a sense that I wasn’t sure I had. I’ve caught myself at times in galleries silently nodding as this thing that was on the tip of my tongue is represented to me, and there’s a kind of feeling of relief that goes with that. It’s magical to me in those moments.

Almost, dare I say, a place where I experience spirituality – my connection to the bigger we.

Sometimes it might take me to a place of sadness. Social anxiety; human suffering; the loss of love; the struggle with sorrow. Sometimes it’s joyous, or funny. Outrageously ridiculous, or ridiculously outrageous….those moments are the best! I’ve even at times been disgusted by pieces of contemporary art where I’ve walked in and turned around moments later.

But it’s all good as the saying goes…it all matters, it all sticks and swirls around inside and makes some sense of the sometimes chaotic world we live in and that lives in us. It is all worth it for the sense it provides that we are not alone in the universe. That the infinite uniqueness of our experiences can be represented and shared and we have places like the CAG where we can gather to experience, discuss, and celebrate them.

It’s pretty great.

Please keep in touch, and I hope to see you soon at a CAG event.

 

Marcella Munro became President of the Board of the Contemporary Art Gallery on June 19, 2014.

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Marcella Munro, Art is a Gift


“What if where you are right now is all you need to be?”

This was a question Christopher House repeatedly asked us during his “Dancing in the Now” workshop. The CAG’s Youth Summer Intensive participants and mentors were  lucky enough to participate in a very thought-provoking, educational, and exciting two hour workshop with Toronto based choreographer, Christopher House.  As a part of the 2014 Dancing on the Edge programming, Christopher House performed a piece co-choreographed by Deborah Hay entitled The Body in Question. His final performance was Friday, July 11th 2014- check the Dancing on the Edge website for more schedule and programming information.

The Contemporary Art Gallery launched their Summer Youth Intensive, a ten week course for emerging artists interested in cross-disciplinary movement-based performance last week.  Led by four established artists, the 11 participants are considering the intersections between dance, choreography and visual art, culminating in the creation and production of a new work.  A part of this intensive allows for the participants to attend workshops, artists talks and studio visits, and Christopher House’s workshop was one of them!

House’s workshop encouraged the participants to dance in the “now”, to really focus on the embodied present and not to second guess our actions. In encouraging us to move in the “ways that we see the space around us”, House taught us about giving our bodies agency, timing and to consider the differences between space and place.

After the workshop, House stayed to speak with our group where he answered our questions about his work and regarding our individual practices. He shared methodological and creation process tips that will be useful for the Summer Intensive group as they move into developing their own works!

This group is ambitious, talented and inspiring- I can’t wait to follow their process during this summer intensive!

- Lindsay Lachance

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Keeping ‘one eye in’ and ‘one eye out’ at Christopher House’s Dance Workshop


Brendan Fernandes, the CAG’s summer artist in residence has begun the creation process for his new work! I had the pleasure to visit Brendan during one of his rehearsals earlier this week. Fernandes talked about how he will incorporate themes of labour, the duration of time, notions of self-hood and identity into the creation of this piece.

He is challenging the notion of muscle memory and exploring ideas around the foot as a fetishized object. I’m excited to see how Fernandes will integrate notions of stillness and repetition into his piece. We will be following Fernandes’ creation and rehearsal process over the next few weeks, and stay tuned to find out details regarding his open in-progress performance.

- Lindsay Lachance

 

 

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Brendan Fernandes and ‘The Foot Stretcher’


As the new Development Assistant for the Contemporary Art Gallery’s 26th Annual Gala & Auction, I am so excited to be a part of the CAG’s team and to connect with the CAG’s surrounding community.

My name is Olivia de Fleuriot de la Coliniere – I usually shorten my last name to de Fleuriot to avoid confusion or bewilderment. I was born in Durban, South Africa and moved to Toronto with my family when I was five years old. I grew up amongst creativity and colour, which encourages me to pursue my passion to create and study fine art. I recently completed my Bachelor of Art degree, majoring in Art + Design, at Trinity Western University and will be continuing this upcoming academic year as an Honours student. I aspire to pursue a career in a gallery setting and educational environment, as well as my own artistic practice.

The team here, at the CAG, has been welcoming and supportive. I work directly with Sue Lavitt, Head of Development and Communication, and also other staff and volunteers at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

It has been an exciting adventure corresponding, researching, and writing about the various artists being presented at the gala fundraiser this year. I can’t wait for you to experience the fantastic night and participate by supporting both the artists and the CAG in their role locally, nationally, and internationally. It is very tempting to blurt out the broad display of talent being presented this year, but I shall keep you in suspense a bit longer!

I am quite happy to say that my experience here at the Contemporary Art Gallery does not end this August. Before my current position, I volunteered and assisted Shaun Dacey, the Curator of Learning and Public Programs, with research and educational practices. From this experience I will be co leading the Family Day events that take place the last Saturday of every month. It would be great to see you at a Family Day event or at the Annual Gala & Auction this fall!

There will be more blogs coming up to give you a taste of this year’s Gala & Auction in retrospective of a 25 year history.

- Olivia de Fleuriot

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Hello from Olivia de Fleuriot!


This post written by Kelli Sturkenboom is the first in a series titled ‘From the Archives’ which will highlight and explore moments in CAG history related to current programming and events. Look for new posts every Thursday.

I was looking through publications from past CAG exhibitions and stumbled upon a catalogue for Tendencies: New Art From Mexico City, an exhibition displayed here in 1996. Guest curated by Rubén Gallo and Terence Gower, this exhibition featured eight artists from Mexico and touched on notions of the difficulty of explicitly defining “Mexican culture” and “Mexican identity.” The artists were; Rodrigo Aldana, Marco Arce, Aurora Boreal, Eduardo Cervantes, Silvia Gruner, Yishai Jusidman, Daniela Rossell and Saúl Villa. Gallo discussed how, rather than being an exhibition of “Mexican art,” this collection challenges us to think about the limitations of categorizing these works as such.

Currently, the CAG is presenting an installation by Mexican artist Stefan Brüggemann; Headlines and Last Lines in the Movies and the CAG Shop has copies of his limited edition bookwork of the same name.  Although Brüggemann’s first language is Spanish, the installation features a collection of news story headlines and quotes from movies spray-painted in English on the gallery’s boarded-up façade. The headlines are collected from both local and global sources; some even referencing Vancouver.

What I like most about this work is the fact that it creates conversation. I’ve seen many people posting on social media questioning whether it is “for real” or vandalism, identifying their favourite phrases, and guessing what sources some of the lines come from. Like Tendencies, it also addresses the idea of the artist’s identity and whether Headlines and Last Lines in the Movies, with references to Canadian news stories and Hollywood films, can be described as “Mexican art.”

Join the conversation–come visit us at 555 Nelson Street before September 7 to see Brüggemann’s installation and check out Tendencies: New Art From Mexico City and Headlines and Last Lines in the Movies in the CAG bookshop!

Visit the CAG then tweet or post your pics of the mural to @CAGVancouver  #headlinesandlastlines

- Kelli Sturkenboom

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From the Archives | Tendencies: New Art From Mexico City


My name is Kelli Sturkenboom and this summer I will be working as the Communications Intern at the Contemporary Art Gallery. I have just completed my third year of study towards a B.A.Hons. in Art History with a minor in Management at McGill University in Montreal. For the past nine months I have been on exchange at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, and having returned only two weeks ago, I’m still adjusting to this completely different pace of life (and time zone).

I am really looking forward to gaining hands-on experience at the gallery this summer. I have always been interested in working in a space like this, but until now I have only been given the opportunity to experience similar institutions as a visitor. I am excited to be involved in the production of the gallery’s functions for its enthusiastic guests, as well as contribute to spreading information and creating buzz about the awesome exhibitions, programs and events that the Contemporary Art Gallery puts on for those who may be unfamiliar with it. So far, I have been working on research related to social and online media and how use of certain platforms can benefit the gallery.

Stay tuned to the CAG Blog for updates about my projects throughout the summer.

PS: I can’t wait for the upcoming exhibition at the CAG; Legion by Kelly Richardson which opens on Thursday July 10, 7-10pm. Join me for the opening!

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Hello from Kelli!


My name is Lindsay Lachance, this Summer’s Learning and Public Programs Assistant and I am excited to be working with Shaun Dacey, Curator of Learning and Public Programs and other staff and volunteers at the CAG. I’ve just completed the first year of my PhD in Theatre and First Nations Studies at the University of British Columbia. I will be contributing to the CAG blog via interviews with artists, reviews, and news on upcoming learning events and residencies. I am really looking forward to participating and helping with the education and community programs that the gallery is organizing this summer, and to engaging with Brendan Fernandes, CAG  Burrard Marina Field House Summer artist-in-residence. Please stay tuned for my updates!

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Hello from Lindsay Lachance!


Brooklyn based artist and Burrard Marina Field House Studio artist-in-residence, Marie Lorenz has arrived back in Vancouver and has got to work right away on building her handmade driftwood boat.

Check out the images above of her progress so far.

The first image is the first step in the process, it is of the frame that the boat will be built on and is a marker or guide for the whole shape of the boat. Lorenz pre-made this frame and shipped it from New York in order to assemble it here. This is the same boat frame that was used to build the boat she rowed at the Frieze Art Fair in NYC in early May (see pictures here and above). The piece of driftwood, that is seen in the photos on top of the frame, will become the bow of the boat – this is first piece of the actual boat – she will be using found driftwood from beaches in the lower mainland to make the rest, stay tuned for more updates on the building process and launch.

For more information on the residency program and Marie Lorenz’s residency click here.

For details on related events click here.

Click here for some  press on the Frieze Art Fair boat rides with Marie Lorenz.

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Boat building with Marie Lorenz


We are pleased to welcome back Brooklyn based artist Marie Lorenz at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio for a residency and project titled ‘Driftboat’. Marie will be here until early June building a new vessel as part of her ongoing project www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org. Look for updates on this blog of Marie at the Field House Studio, getting to work building her boat from driftwood sourced from the lower mainland. Read more about her residency and the Burrard Marina Field House here.

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Marie Lorenz just arrived back in Vancouver!


Hi everyone, my name is Sojin. I’m a recent Visual Arts graduate from Emily Carr University of Art + Design (ECUAD). During my studies at ECUAD I began to develop my interest in curatorial practice. I’m particularly interested in the idea of space both in its physical and metaphysical (re)presentation. Creating unity out of fractured pieces and coming up with a narrative of my own is what I enjoy the most about curating. Besides my curatorial interest, I also paint and sculpt! For the past two years, I’ve worked with Vancouver’s experimental galleries and artist run centres to study how galleries function. For this year I’ll be working at the Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG) as Program Assistant, assisting the CAG team with the highly anticipated public programs and further learning about galleries in depth.

My first week of work was action-packed. For the first couple of days, I studied the two current exhibitions—Aurélien Froment Fröbel Fröbeled and Tim Etchells Who Knows. I had an opportunity to glimpse at how the exhibitions are organized from scratch by being involved in the process, you will be surprised to know the amount of time and effort it takes to actualize an exhibition. In the last few days of the week I helped staff and volunteers with the packing of Mungo Thomson and Erin Shirreff publications for them to be shipped to the Los Angeles Art Book Fair, which the CAG is participating in.

There always is a bitter emptiness when art works are taken down from gallery walls. The spatial emptiness was particularly evident in the de-install of James Welling’s show since the exhibition itself was quite bodily in its presentation. As you can see from the pictures above, Welling’s works were packed up into crates, leaving only the skeletal structure of the walls that once embodied the energetic volume and rhythm of the corpus. The memory lingered on me for a while.

In no time at all the new crates arrived, walls were painted white, but more importantly, the artist Aurélien Froment arrived. During the conversation I had with Nigel Prince, the Director of the CAG, I was able to imagine the new exhibitions viscerally. For Fröbel Fröbeled, the gallery is divided into two different spaces, one for adults and the other for children; Fröbel’s Gifts will also be displayed on plinths for public interaction. Fröbel, a founder of kindergarten and an inventor of the Play Gifts, will be introduced with photographs. When you come see the show, it is important to understand that these Gifts are not just cylinders, spheres, square blocks and strings, but are creative tools to (re)imagine oneself in relation to the Universe or to something much more expansive. Meanwhile, the building’s façade features a new neon commission by British artist Tim Etchells. The façade is set up with twenty-two phrases of single line block neon letters stating ‘I KNOW, ‘YOU KNOW’, ‘WE KNOW’, ‘THEY KNOW’. The short sinister statements along with vibrant neon colours makes it seem like you are standing in front of someone who is looking deep inside you. Full of character and attitude, Etchell’s neon works bring out an eerie but comical atmosphere to the neighborhood. The display sparks with theatricality in the text with the very act of reading and further investigates the idea of surveillance with humor and wit. The works of both Aurélien Froment and Tim Etchells suggest new ways of understanding identity formation through various interactive approaches.

For this partnership with PuSh International Performing Art Festival, Etchell’s Sight Is The Sense That Dying People Tend to Lose First and The Quiet Volume was also available for public viewing.

I am thrilled to work on these multi-faceted exhibitions, exciting off-site programs and performances. I am sure that the dialogue they create with the public will disseminate well beyond the walls of the gallery.

I look forward to meeting you all!

Sojin

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First week on the job!


British artist Mike Nelson continues his scouring of Vancouver and lower mainland beaches for flotsom and jetsam in preparation for his ambitious solo exhibition at the CAG which opens on Friday September 13. Photographs by Phil Dion.

The exhibition includes two brand new commissions, a sculptural work produced in partnership with Toronto’s Power Plant and a new photographic work made in association with the Banff Centre, Walter Phillips Gallery.

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Beach combing with Mike


This is Part III of an interview with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly and CAG Field House intern Jaclyn Bruneau. Preceding Part III was a Part I and II. Check ‘em out.

Afternoons with Raymond – PART III

JB: Can you talk a little bit about how your own heritage relates to your work? I know you’ve talked about challenging these more classical, traditional ways of representing indigenous cultures.

RB: Well it does come to inform my work, but not in any simple way. I have made works that sort of trade on traditional imagery. I’m always sort of concerned with making sure that the work doesn’t come to be mistaken for the thing it represents. I’m interested in my capacity as an indigenous artist to be able to make work about indigenous issues that doesn’t simply reduce that to me making work about indigenous issues because I am myself indigenous.
I would like to think that I am also making work about these things because they’re important to everyone. They concern certain circumstances that we’re all in the midst of that come to impact us in uneven ways. So it becomes something that I definitely want to make accessible in a way that is about it coming to have this capacity to communicate something of that experience but in a strange, unfamiliar, unforeseen way.

So my heritage comes to influence that and it’s kind of about seeing a certain possibility in that, in terms of making contemporary art that doesn’t have to come close to aboriginal cultural practices as it is known, but could potentially work towards creating some sort of intuitive change to things or a subtle way of actually just letting material come to do something in and of itself. It’s a complex process in that—in a lot of works, my heritage isn’t necessarily readable in it and I’m interested in that discrepancy, where it becomes sort of, like, a furtive presence. It ultimately requires a certain activity to understand that relationship.

JB: What other cultures have affected you and influenced your work?

RB: A lot of things I’ve been interested in have been about the analyses of subcultures. I look to music a lot. I look at a lot of things that primarily address ideas of cultural transformation as represented through popular music, like the strange idea that both funk and heavy metal are derived from rhythm and blues in a way that each musical form was subtly transformed in a certain transitional process to communicate to a particular audience at a given time and place, but somehow leads to these very divergent forms.

So I’m really interested in that thing where it scarcely becomes that thing that it’s going to be. At least, looking at funk and heavy metal—not specifically cultures, but subcultural forms—becomes an interesting analogy between, at least for me—in terms of trying to understand that process—simply conceiving of an artistic practice isn’t about knowing what it is but realizing that my work can come to transform my understanding of things I have done previously.

JB: What does digital culture have to do with all of this? I’m thinking about the LightJet prints that were on display in March and April which you created by dragging your iPhone around a flatbed scanner as it played musical performances from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Is there a particular comment you’re making by converging these multiple electronic processes of new and old?

RB: So they’re prints made by laser exposing the piece of paper. It’s processed like any photograph, so I guess that melding becomes a strange thing of finding some other sort of way to show the manner in which photography can index time. In a lot of cases, strangely, many of the scans that I made scanned right to left rather than left to right, so it creates these weird tensions that might not be visible. But I like that strange thing in which these different technologies come to function—that they can be used in these ways that they weren’t necessarily intended to be used for; to create some image of these different types of image-making. The ipod on the scanner leaves this layer in between the two of them—the dust and scratches on the glass, so it’s this strange thing of there being a depicted sort of material and an actual material, somehow.

I’m hearing all these stories about children’s intuitive use of touch screen technology that comes to affect the way that they expect printed magazines to function. It leads me to think of that strange thing where our encounter with visual material just creates this different relationship we have to it that is about interacting with it; seeing a certain capacity with it to touch it to make it work.

I think that process of using the ipods and the scanners means to—well, that easily manipulable aspect of it to hold an ipod in my hand—it’s sort of about stressing that physical manifestation of it. That it persists as an object that can be used in these weird ways. So it’s just a present capacity of an ipod and a scanner to produce an image in a very ad hoc way.

JB: Tell us about some of the books on your shelves.

RB: [Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language], I’m looking at it because I’m teaching a course that is ostensibly about text-based art. The book is this really amazing thing—there are chapters in it that deal with the use of geological metaphors and biological metaphors in our understanding of language… so the idea that a language could be said to die as being a biological metaphor. Looking at shifts, thinking of the way in which language shifts where two languages can come to encounter one another and have subtle effects on one another is often discussed in terms of geology. So it’s a really amazing in the sense that it finds all this incredibly rich imagery in the way people sort of discuss language; and what people expect of it.

JB: How does it read?

RB: It’s quite academic, but really kind of a fascinating thing in the sense that it’s episodic. I know a lot of these started as individual articles—like, H & Co. was first published in Cabinet. So it reads very easily in the sense that it’s not very demanding and fairly short and accessible. So it’s a really incredible book that I’ve been returning to for quite a while and that I’m excited to finally be able to share with students.

JB: Where are you at with the course?

RB: I’m teaching it at Emily Carr and there’s a lot of planning to do for it this month [August].

JB: What else have you got in that pile?

RB: [chuckles] What else?

JB: Show me one more.

RB: Well, there’s this incredible Jimmie Durham catalog—A Matter of Life and Death and Singing. [Begins flipping through the book and does not stop until his response concludes]. This is part of a career-long retrospective. It’s this incredible document that is exciting in the sense that it seems tied to a lot of these other things, like a collection of his poetry and critical writings that are also coming out, but he’s just someone that I really admire and it’s nice to see this kind of extended document concerning his career.

JB: Thank you so much for your time.

RB: No problem.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part III


British artist Mike Nelson arrived in Vancouver last Friday to begin work on his upcoming exhibition at the CAG for which he will present two new works.

With just over a month to the opening Mike is getting right to the task of collecting beach debris off local and regional shores, to build what will be his first solo exhibition in Canada. On Monday he started combing the beaches along the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal and Iona Beach in Richmond.

Here are a few images from his first day’s search and findings!

Posted by Michaela Rife. Photos by Derek Brunnen.

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Mike Nelson begins work on his upcoming exhibition at the CAG


Mike Nelson’s fourth day of beachcombing proves fruitful. Here are a couple of behind-the-scenes photos with a sneak peek at some of his findings!

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Mike Nelson at the mouth of the Fraser River


My name is Brenna and I am a GAG Volunteer in the Abraham Rogatnick Library. It took me a while to discover the library and the great resources it holds. I’ve been volunteering in the library for about 7 months now and I think it is a great way to spend my time. Below, you will find a few of the reasons why I love being a library volunteer.

1. I get the chance to research contemporary art. This is one of the main reasons I love the library. We are constantly receiving and entering new materials, which means I get to look through them as I enter the information on the Database. We are also searching and updating the material already existing in the library and I will often come across items that I want to take a look at. Basically it is a gold mine of information on Contemporary Art.

2. It is peaceful. I love coming in after a hectic week and sitting down, cracking open a book and working away. There are of course other people to talk to, but for the most part it is a meditative task that helps me unwind and relax.

3. It helps me stay informed. The library has current periodicals and catalogues of current shows ready to be looked at right on the main table. It’s great to take a flip through these and see what’s going on.

4. The great people I’ve met. It’s great to connect with other volunteers and staff. The great atmosphere at the gallery is because of these people.

5. It’s rewarding to be a part of something that benefits the community. The materials in this Library are amazing and anyone can come in and take a look at them for free.

So there you have it, that’s why you will find me spending Sunday afternoons in the Library at the CAG. Come by and say hi sometime and check out the great resources the library has to offer. You can search the library database or book an appointment to use the library by using the CAG website.

- Brenna

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Reasons why I love being a library volunteer


A behind the scenes look at the installation of Itee Pootoogook’s Sky at Night,  a Cape Dorset sunset comes to Yaletown.

The offsite project at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line is presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program — IntransitBC.

 

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Look what’s happening at Yaletown-Roundhouse Station…


New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées

Did you know that there is a free guided visit at the CAG almost every week during an exhibition? | Savez-vous qu’il y a une visite guidée chez la galerie d’art contemporain presque chaque semaine au cours d’une exhibition? (lisez ce poste en français).

The CAG team has worked very hard to ensure that guided tours are scheduled regularly throughout the course of our exhibitions, and that dedication has given recently given birth to a new series of tours starting this month: multi-language guided visits. For the first time ever, our guided visits are now offered in Mandarin and Spanish!

I have been proud to present our guided visits in French for the past 3 exhibitions, taking over from artist Patricia Huijnen following her return to Switzerland last year. It’s been a real pleasure for me, as I love the French language and often lament that I do not have the chance to speak it as much as I would like. I also love talking about art, and the opportunity to do so at the Contemporary Art Gallery is both challenging and satisfying. Contemporary art can be difficult to understand at first glance, and bringing context, new ideas, and new ways of thinking to visitors has been, for me, an incredibly rewarding privilege.

When I was in school, it was always a struggle to fully appreciated fine-arts field trips when the exhibitions weren’t being presented in the language in which we were being instructed. My teachers would be diligently providing us with French vocabulary and tools with which to engage with the art, but when it was time to visit a gallery, museum or event, it was often jarring to listen to tours in English. There was something really special about the tours that were offered in French.

When Shaun Dacey, our new Curator of Learning and Public Programs, joined the CAG team in April, I wrote to him to tell him about how much I loved working in French at the CAG. Imagine my delight, when he not only echoed my enthusiasm, but informed me that he was already working to add additional language tours to the schedule.

Tommy Ting hosts CAG guided tours in MandarinI attended the Mandarin tour, hosted by artist Tommy Ting, on Saturday the 18th, and was delighted to see the engagement in our visitor’s faces while they discussed and engaged with the work in their own language. While I was unable to make the following week’s tour, hosted by photographer Avelina Crespo, I have been told it was well attended and equally well received. Both Tommy and Avelina have agreed to join us again later this summer to again present Mandarin and Spanish language tours at our upcoming exhibition.

I am truly proud to be part of the team providing multi-language tours at the CAG. I invite you to join me on June 1st at 3PM for my guided visit, in French, of the Nancy Holt/Erin Shirreff exhibition currently on display at the CAG.

Kay Slater (@kdot) is a Vancouver illustrator, and proud volunteer at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Come visit her on shift every Sunday from Noon-3PM.

♦ ♦ ♦

L’équipe à la galerie a beaucoup travaillé pour s’assurer que les visites guidées sont programmées régulièrement tout au long de nos expositions, et ce dévouement a donné récemment naissance à une nouvelle série de visites ce mois-ci: des visites guidées multilingues! Pour la première fois, nos visites guidées sont maintenant offerts en mandarin et en espagnol!

Je suis fière d’avoir organisée nos visites guidées en français pour les dernières 3 expositions, succédant à l’artiste Patricia Huijnen après son retour en Suisse l’année dernière. Cela a été un réel plaisir pour moi, comme je suis amoureuse de la langue française et se plaignent souvent que je n’ai pas la chance de parler (ou d’écrire) en français autant que je le voudrais. J’aime aussi parler de l’art, et l’opportunité de le faire à la galerie d’art contemporain est à la fois stimulante et satisfaisante. L’art contemporain peut être difficile à comprendre au premier vu, et apportant le contexte, des nouvelles idées, et de nouvelles façons de penser à nos visiteurs est, pour moi, un privilège extrêmement enrichissante.

Kay Slater mène une visite guidée en français du travail de Nathan Coley.

Mon français est devenu assez rouiller après avoir pas eu la chance de l’utiliser quotidiennement, mais j’espère que mon passion pour l’art et pour la langue le compense.

Tommy Ting leads a guided tour in Mandarin at the CAG. 18 Mai, 2013Quand j’étais à l’école, c’était toujours difficile d’apprécier des excursions beaux-arts lorsque les expositions n’ont pas été présentées dans la langue dans laquelle nous étions instruits. Nos enseignants seraient diligents en nous fournir le vocabulaire et des outils pour s’engager avec l’art, mais quand il était temps de visiter une galerie, une musée ou un événement, il était souvent choquant à entendre des visites guidées en anglais. Il y avait quelque chose de vraiment spécial dans les visites qui ont été offerts en français; c’était peut-être simplement parce qu’ils étaient si rares, mais peut-être c’était également comment facile c’était à comprendre et à apprécier ces œuvres.

Quand Shaun Dacey, notre nouveau curateur de l’apprentissage et des programmes publiques, a rejoint l’équipe CAG en Avril, je lui ai écrit pour lui dire combien j’adore travailler en français au CAG. Imaginez ma joie, quand il a non seulement fait écho à mon enthousiasme, mais m’a informé qu’il travaillait déjà à ajouter d’autres visites en plusieurs langues à l’horaire.

J’ai participé à la première visite guidée en mandarine, organisée par l’artiste Tommy Ting, et j’ai été ravi de voir l’engagement dans les visages de nos visiteurs pendant qu’ils ont eu la chance de discuter et de s’engager avec le travail dans leur propre langue. Tandis que je n’ai pas pu participer à la visite guidée en espagnol la semaine suivante, organisée par le photographe Avelina Crespo, on m’a dit qu’il a été bien fréquenté et tout aussi bien accueilli. Tommy et Avelina ont accepté de nous rejoindre cet été pour présenter à nouveau des visites en mandarin et en espagnol à propos de notre prochaine exposition.

Je suis vraiment fière de faire partie de l’équipe offrant des visites multilingues à la CAG. Je vous invite à me rejoindre le 1er Juin à 15 heures pour ma visite guidée, en français, de l’exposition Nancy Holt / Erin Shirreff présentement exposée au CAG.

 

Kay Slater (@ kdot) est une illustratrice de Vancouver, et bénévole à la Galerie d’Art Contemporain. Venez la rendre visite tous les dimanches de midi à 15 heures.

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New guided visits | Nouvelles visites guidées


We are all set up and excited for tonight’s opening of the New York Art Book Fair at PS1 MoMA, come by our booth Q49 on the second floor. We are presenting CAG publications from 30 years of publishing, among them Christopher Williams, Robert Orchardson, Sarah Browne, Roy Arden, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Ken Lum, Shannon Oksanen, Frances Stark and many more. We are also featuring limited edition prints by Robert Orchardson and Thomas Bewick. We will also have some rare signed copies of several of our publications as well!

See you at the fair, yours Jill and Soledad.

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CAG at the New York Art Book Fair, Opens Tonight!


Since mid-July, WAVES by Nicolas Sassoon has been on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Skytrain Station. This is the second commission the CAG has produced for this public space. The first was Scott Massey’s poetic blue sky.

Currently Nicolas Sassoon’s graphic mural is installed on the north window of the Station. For this work, Nicolas created a multi-layer Moire pattern to intentional cause an optical effect that gives an impression of movement – so commuters can see WAVES “moving” as they are passing by to catch their train.

The installation seems to evolve during the day with the change of light. WAVES is highlighted in the morning from the inside of the station, because of the rising sun, and from the outside in the late afternoon. The wind also accentuates the pattern by making the layer vibrate gently and when a train passes through the turbulence adds a dramatic tension.

Every day I commute through this station myself, and as I go down the stairs, I can sense the effect’s of the mural.  It catches my field of vision and when I look closer, I notice the coloured screen of WAVES, which not only draws my attention to my own movement but also the trees and the light outside through its pixels.

Nicolas Sassoon’s Off-site project WAVES will remain on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line until January 20, 2013.

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Moving WAVES


On Wednesday July 11 between 1:30 and 4:30 am Nicolas Sassoon with four extension ladders and some expert help installed the first layer of WAVES  at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Canada Line Station.

It was a difficult task  getting to the North windows above the stairs. We tried the morning before with a boom, but couldn’t get the massive machine through the door.

Thanks to Contrada Enterprises LTD for helping us solve the problem. In less than 24 hours they pulled together a great crew who fearlessly climbed the 40 foot extension ladders and clamped on the frame in less than three hours.

The mural was finished the next afternoon by Proper Design who perfectly applied the second layer to the outside windows.

Many thanks to both. The piece looks great. It is on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line until January 20, 2013. We hope you get to see it numerous times.

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Open Your Eyes and Watch Your Step at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station


“Hello & welcome to the Contemporary Art Gallery!”

Have you been by in the last few months? There are 3 great exhibits showing right now, and you should make time to come visit! When you’re by & chatting with the friendly front desk volunteer, you might spy a few Artist Edition prints behind them. Don’t forget to look behind you as well, because there is another print hanging to the left of the BC Binning Gallery entrance. Let me tell you about these pieces that we have displayed in the entrance foyer. For even more information, visit the publication page at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca

Thomas Bewick, Limited Edition Print, Apr 2009
Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK, Edition of 75.
$150, unframed

A limited edition printed on a hand press by Iain Bain from the original wood-blocks. Of the 3 subjects, the Bulldog was engraved for the 1790 edition of the Quadrupeds; the Lesser Redpole, and the tail-piece of the man relieving himself beside a fragment of ruined wall were made for the first 1797 volume of the British Birds. What is amazing about Thomas Bewick’s work is both the delicate and intricate marks he was able to make with the tools of the time, and the witty narrative that Bewick injected into his work. To quote the exhibition notes:

Intended as illustrations of ‘some truth or point of some moral’ they provide an invaluable insight into social history while also demonstrating the artist’s imagination and wit. As such these narrative works will provide an interesting counterpoint to the work of many internationally established artists in Vancouver, engaging in image making which critically examines and reflects on the city and conditions which surround them.

Robert Orchardson, Study for Endless Façade ,Limited Edition Giclée print, Nov 17, 2011
Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver / Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK, Edition of 50.
$150, unframed

This limited edition print, 13″ x 18.5″, was produced to coincide with the exhibition Robert Orchardson Endless façade which ran from November 2011 until January 2012. The show transformed half of the gallery into another world as visitors walked through a giant triangular entrance way into a science-fiction-like set featuring Robert’s work. I quite liked the following quote from the exhibit notes:

He also sees this sense of possibility inherent in stage sets, where a narrative exists between the material character of the set itself, and the ‘other’ identity it adopts within the context of a play.

His installation partially revisited stage sets designed by Isamu Noguchi in 1955 for a Royal Shakespeare Company production of King Lear.

Rodney Graham Jacob Grimm’s Study in Berlin/Wilhelm Grimm’s Study in Berlin (1960), Etchings, 1992
Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, 2 prints unframed.
$2,000 (pair), unframed

Perhaps you’re stopping by the gallery after having spent some time checking out Rodney Graham’s new exhibition over at the Vancouver Art Gallery? Remember, the CAG is only 5 blocks away from the VAG so you can continue your gallery-viewing excursion all afternoon!

We are showcasing a set of etchings by Graham that was published by the Contemporary Art Gallery in 1992, and was conceived in relation to Five Interior Proposals for the Grimm Brother’s Studies in Berlin (1992), the project Graham exhibited at Documenta in Kassel, Germany. The images are variations on the studies occupied by the Brothers Grimm in the 1860s in Berlin, based on period watercolours.

Scott Massey, Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake) – Limited Edition Print, Feb 2012
Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, Archival inkjet print, edition of 15, unframed.
$150, unframed

There is still time to see Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake) at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station (Canada-Line), co-presented Contemporary Art Gallery and Translink for the Canada Line Public Art Program.To coincide with the exhibition, Massey has produced a limited edition, Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake) (2012), an archival inkjet print, edition of 15, 20 x 20 inches.

In Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake), Massey combined 170+ photographs of the night sky on the same strip of film. I like that I can walk down to Davie street and not only see the night sky in the middle of the city, but I also get to see it during the day time. For more information about this exhibition, please see: http://www.thecanadaline.com/

Interested in buying one of these editions? Come down to the Contemporary Art Gallery Tuesday – Sunday, Noon-6PM and speak to someone at the front desk, or email info@contemporaryartgallery.ca.

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Artist editions for sale!


If you were walking down Nelson Street in the evening between February 3rd and May 16th, you hopefully spied the work Aurorae by Scott Massey in the CAG street front window spaces. During the day, the window spaces appeared to be coated in some kind of nondescript blue paint and visitors would come into the gallery either unaware that there was something on display or perplexed as to what it represented. When on my volunteer shift at the gallery, I would welcome visitors to make a date to come back to the gallery after dark so that they could enjoy the light-show piece, but as the gallery was closed most evenings after 6 pm, I never really saw if anyone came back to satisfy their curiosity.

I was  lucky enough to have a friend live in the building across the street and we made a special tea & art viewing date together, specifically so that we could spend an evening with Aurorae.

But even if you didn’t have a friend living across the street from the gallery, or if you didn’t find the time after dark to see Massey’s light display piece in the window spaces, you’re able to see it here thanks to his time lapse video below.

As the night sky lightens on Massey’s celestial light-show phenomenon, the light takes on a more earthly halogen with Josephine Meckseper’s discussion on consumer culture and the world of advertising. The exhibition American Leg by Josephine Meckseper opens on Thursday, May 24th (7-10 PM). Currently based in New York, this will be Meckseper’s first exhibition in Canada.  Additionally Josephine Meckseper will talk on her work on Wednesday May 23 at 7 pm at SFU Woodwards, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, this talk is free and all are welcome.

Scott Massey’s Off-site project Via Lactea (above Glacier Lake) will remain on view at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line until July 1st. This piece, also dealing with the night sky, can be seen in the day time (or night time).

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Window Spaces Fade to Black


Matthew Monahan is interviewed for Life on Mars the Carnegie International in 2008. Matthew Monahan’s first Canadian solo exhibition opens at the Contemporary Art Gallery on Thursday April 26 and continues until July 1, 2012.

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Matthew Monahan opens tonight at the CAG


Beginning May 25 through September 2 2012, Josephine Meckseper will create eight new works for the window vitrines on the CAG’s exterior. Currently based in New York, this will be Meckseper’s first exhibition in Canada. Utilizing these spaces as a site that mimics a commercial display, her work invites a critique of the aesthetic  and political connotations of the objects presented within. The juxtapositions of materials and objects in her installations compose a kind of narrative that challenge the world of advertising and consumer culture.

Below is an interview with Josephine Meckseper and Flavin Judd from Bomb Magazine speaking about her work and practice.

http://bombsite.com/issues/999/articles/3233

Karina Irvine – Curatorial Intern

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Next on at the CAG: Josephine Meckseper


Flesh and Blood, Shary Boyle’s solo exhibition closed yesterday. It was a busy weekend with nearly 100 visitors. Today Phil Dion is fastidiously packing it up and preparing to ship the works back to Toronto. The gallery will be closed for the next two weeks. We will reopen on the  September 8, from 6-9pm with three new exhibitions To create is to relate by Corita Kent, Tale-pieces by Thomas Bewick, and Vibrantes by Federico Herrero, regular gallery hours are Wednesday to Sunday, 12-6 pm. Hope to see you soon!

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flesh and blood packed in crates


Installation – behind the scenes – images from the exhibition by Kirsten Pieroth,  I don’t know if Thomas Edison invented the excuse in 2004.

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BRICKS BRICKS BRICKS


The Contemporary Art Gallery is pleased to welcome returning staff member,  Lisa Fedorak!

Lisa joins us now from her post as the Executive Director of  Malaspina Printmakers to take up the post of  Program Administrator.  Lisa states that; “She is thrilled to be back  and she is looking forward to all the exciting programming in the months to come”. Speaking of which, don’t forget to check out the current Shary Boyle exhibition and Ron Tran off-site before they both close on Sunday August 21st.

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Welcome Back, Lisa!


On Saturday July 9th, Ron Tran gave a personal walking tour of his latest project, A Way to Go, which is itself a guided tour. Tran lead the attendees and a pony through alleys, which he named based on his earlier experience. The artist interspersed personal antidotes to elaborate on the prerecorded audio and images of the augmented reality tour.

At “stops” along the way Tran spoke about his interest in using the form of a guided walk to structure and depict his own experience of the city. Its formal characteristics spurred him to traverse places he wouldn’t normally consider, build narrative associations between specific locations, establish relationships with people he encountered and employ new technologies to guide an audience on an unexpected route through Vancouver’s downtown core.

Tran led a pony on his walking tour. This performative gesture was deliberately comic, adding a fantastical element that no doubt caused some double takes and created a degree of surprise. However, the animal also functioned romantically, as a poetic device to conjure a past time, becoming the antithesis of the GPS technology utilized as a guiding tool for this project.

A Way to Go, is the first in a series of projects using interactive technologies which take programming outside of the gallery allowing audiences to experience contemporary art within the wider context of the city. Working with Autobox Media and Hannah Hughes, the Contemporary Art Gallery has designed a program that uses Layar Reality Browser to guide audiences on a journey where they can explore and interact with artwork they encounter along the way. These projects will work on iphone and android smartphone’s. Devices are available at the gallery for visitors wishing to borrow one.

 

For more inforamtion please go to our website:  http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/#home

 

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Walking Tour with Ron Tran: Postscript


Hello dear CAG Blog readers,

My name is Kevin Day. I am one of the new curatorial interns who just joined the Contemporary Art Gallery this month. Today I had the privilege of taking Ron Tran’s A Way to Go, an off-site project involving a guided tour of the artist’s earlier experience of walking through the downtown area. The following are some thoughts I had while taking the tour.

As I came to Emery Barnes Park and listened to the interview with the caretaker of the fountain, there was an uncanny doubling as I was confronted with the feeling that the caretaker was right there talking beside me, yet concurrently, with the realization that he is at that very moment, elsewhere, operating the fountain’s machinery.

At numerous times, I made mental notes to myself that what the artist saw and experienced contrasted with what I was experiencing, such as the realization that the section between Richards and Seymour at Drake was closed off today for construction, relieving myself of the dread and danger of crossing the street that was most likely faced by Tran. Other difference included the fact that “Screaming Alley,” for me, exuded not so much screaming as its most evident trait but a strong waft of fresh laundry, and how in that same alley I did not find five dollars like Tran did but instead a red suitcase.

At Davie and Red Scarf Alley where the artist directed us towards the Found Balloon, I followed Tran’s exact point of view and movements as I watched the video of the balloon traversing the streets.

A constant sentiment that occurred to me throughout the walk was how the two distinct times/experiences (between the artist’s idiosyncratic journey and my own) forcefully merge together, simultaneously and paradoxically, even as their distinction is made evident.

The tour came to an end with an accompanying song, highlighting the common contemporary condition of not just looking at one’s phone all the time (as made evident and necessary throughout the tour), but listening to music everywhere as well, giving the semblance of having a perpetual personal soundtrack.

Here is an audio sample of A Way to Go.

9_Abandoned_Jap_auto_cen.wav

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Screaming Alley smelled like fresh laundry: an entry on Tran’s A Way to Go


Dear CAG Blog readers,

Hello.

My name is Lara Szabo Greisman and I have the pleasure of joining the CAG this summer to help coordinate the catalogue for the annual Art Auction taking place November 5th at the Rosewood Hotel Georgia.
Currently, I am studying at Stockholm University’s International Master’s Program in Curating Art with Management and Law. (Yes, that’s actually the title. We call it “the curating program” or, between ourselves we sometimes call it “school”). Before that I was at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario during which I was a primary collective member of The Artel Arts Accommodation and Venue (another long title) which is an artist-run center whose program includes exhibitions, screenings, workshops, magazine launches and concerts. During my time in Kingston, I was a member of the artist collective Works Cited which put together inter and multi-media performances on subjects such as the tragedy of linear time, the frustration of unscrambling an egg and the colour blue.
As part of my summer contract at the CAG, I am researching local and international artists and their works as well as writing the catalogue texts that will (hopefully) give you a lovely intro into the impressive range of pieces included in the auction this year. So far I have been compiling information on a wide variety of interesting works by artists such as Pablo Bronstein, Hadley + Maxwell, Peter Gazendam, Elizabeth McIntosh and Marcel Dzama, to name just a few.
While I am here, I will also be helping with exhibitions. Speaking of which…have you seen the Shary Boyle show, Flesh and Blood yet? The light and sculpture installation Virus is fascinating as it changes before your eyes from a pure white, mythological type figure to an animated creature in a fantastical neon landscape. Other highlights will be working with Ron Tran’s piece A Way to Go, which leads you on a journey through the alleys, pointing out gems and gestures in places you would never look.

 

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New to the Contemporary Art Gallery


Our two new exhibitions, In the Near Future by Sharon Hayes and Beyond Guilt – The Trilogy by Ruti Sela & Maayan Amir are opening tomorrow evening, Thursday April 7, 6-9 pm. All of the CAG staff have been working hard in preparation. Ruti and Maayan arrived from Tel Aviv yesterday and Sharon flew in from New York City very early this morning. They were all at the gallery today to help with the installation and to talk to our volunteers and interpretive guides. Please come to the opening reception to meet the artists and view these two great works. The CAG will also present  In-Conversation with Sharon Hayes, Ruti Sela and Maayan Amir moderated by CAG Curator Jenifer Papararo on Friday, April 8, 6 pm.

Here are some photos of the exhibitions in process. See you tomorrow.

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Sneak Peek: New Exhibitions Opening Tomorrow


Roy Arden’s solo exhibition at the CAG is now closed. It was extremely well attended, with 2,479 visitors. On March 19th we celebrated the launch of Arden’s artist publication, UNDERTHESUN, which was available at the gallery free of charge and distributed to various locations around the city. We still have some of the publications left and they will be available at the CAG for the price of $10 once we reopen next week. We also released a special edition of 15 black and white archival pigment prints by Roy Arden. They were a great deal and sold out in a flash!

 

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UNDERTHESUN Goes Down


Roy Arden and the CAG staff have been hard at work getting ready for the opening of Roy’s exhibition UNDERTHESUN tomorrow evening from 6-9pm. Here are some photos of the installation process.

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Behind the Scenes: Installation of UNDERTHESUN


A new persistent presence is being felt all around the CAG, it has moved in and left its thin ghostlike trace over most surfaces, DUST, Dust and more dust.

Yntil finally, from hard work and new activity, by the opening of the next exhibition it shall all be gone.

The CAG is currently installing the exhibition Following A Line: Pablo Bronstein, Peter Gazendam, Susanne Kriemann, Kyla Mallett, Alex Morrison, Frances Stark and Paul Sietsema.

Please join us for the opening next Thursday Sept 9, 6 – 9 pm.

Links about dust:

http://bit.ly/bEMj8w

http://www.gearfuse.com/slipper-genie-cleans-your-mess-looks-comfy/

http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/35/dillon.php

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D is for….


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