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Artist Talks

Marie Lorenz – Tidal Dérive
September 1 to 7, 2015 

Fraser River: Hope to Richmond, September 1 to 3 
Salt Spring Island to Isle-de-Lis/Rum Island, September 5 to 7

Schedule may change depending upon water and weather conditions. Click here for a map and itinerary of the journey. www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/blog/map

The Contemporary Art Gallery welcomes New York-based artist Marie Lorenz back to Vancouver. Join Lorenz on a week-long journey down the Fraser River and around the South Gulf Islands using the tides and currents as a guide.

In 2014, Marie Lorenz participated in a CAG residency at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio which included the construction and launch of a boat created from salvaged wood found around Vancouver and the lower mainland coast line. Driftboat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed tidal dérives in San Francisco and most recently along the Russian River, Guerneville, California. From September 1 to 7, Tidal Dérive will unfold as an ambitious multi-day trip along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands. Along the route Lorenz will invite participants to boat with her.

Studying tidal charts of the area, Lorenz uses tides and currents to direct the journey. This simple act offers the unique and unfamiliar experience of viewing river banks, harbours, industrialized landscapes and cities from the water. The experience and movement of floating, powered by natural forces, allows for keen observations and further exploration. As Lorenz describes:

“I believe that the act of floating has an impact on observation. The viewer maintains an awareness of their balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. My boat projects are an attempt to un-know the metropolis by continually exploring it”
Launching from Hope, BC on September 1 and arriving in Richmond on September 3, the voyage uses tidal currents and historic canoe routes. Participants will join Lorenz on this exploratory journey camping overnight in river-side towns and regional parks, navigating the currents while continuing on from Salt Spring Island on September 5, travelling to Portland Island and Isle-de-Lis, returning September 7.

We are reaching out to canoers and kayakers interested in accompanying artist Marie Lorenz on the week-long journey: Tidal Dérive. To RSVP or for further information contact: learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca or call us directly at 604 681 2700.

We acknowledge the generous support of the U.S. Consulate General Vancouver.

BIO: Marie Lorenz was born in Twentynine Palms, California and grew up traveling with her military family. Lorenz has received grants from Artists Space, the Harpo Foundation and the Alice Kimball English Travel Fellowship. In 2008 she was awarded the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize for the American Academy in Rome. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including High Desert Test Sites in Joshua Tree, CA, to MoMA PS1, in New York City. She has completed solo projects at Jack Hanley Gallery in New York; Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK and Artpace in San Antonio, Texas. Her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi (www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org) is an exploration of the coastline in New York City.
Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City and other cities in North America in boats that she designs and builds; her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted material forms explores the intertidal zone. Read more on her ongoing project ‘The Tide and Current Taxi’, www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org. For more information on artist Marie Lorenz go to www.marielorenz.com.

Public events:
Launch event in Hope, BC Time: 9am Place: ‘Put in’ at Wardle Street and 7th Avenue.

Talks and Tours: Our Working Waterfront/Tidal Dérive Thursday, September 3, 5-7pm, free
Our Working Waterfront Guided Tour with Curator, Oana Capota – 5pm New Westminster Museums & Archives 777 Columbia Street, New Westminster
Tidal Dérive Artist Talk with artist Marie Lorenz – 6pm Samson V Maritime Museum 880 Quayside Drive, New Westminster Join an evening of exploring the Fraser River through two unique public programs: A tour of Our Working Waterfront, 1945-2015 at the New Westminster Museum and Archives led by Curator, Oana Capota (5-6pm) followed by an artist talk and public conversation with artist Marie Lorenz (6-7pm). Lorenz Tidal Dérive is a multi-day float along the Fraser River and Southern Gulf Islands in a boat Lorenz made from driftwood found along Vancouver’s shoreline. Lorenz’ The vessel will be on display.

About the Burrard Marina Field House Residency Program: Burrard Marina Field House Studio: 1655 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver. (Located below the Burrard Bridge, near Vanier Park) The Field House Studio is an artist residency space and community hub organized by the CAG. Since 2013 the CAG has hosted several national and international artists including: Raymond Boisjoly, artist collective- Broken City Lab, Brendan Fernandes, Marie Lorenz, Harrell Fletcher, Sameer Farooq & Mirjam Linschooten, Maddie Leach, Keg de Souza and Walter Scott. Read more about the artist-in-residency projects here: http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/blog-category/field-house-studio/ The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of many private and individual donors toward this program. For more details about the Field House Studio Program, all forthcoming residencies and associated events visit our website at www.contemporaryartgallery.ca and follow the Field House blog at www.burrardmarinafieldhouse.wordpress.com

Tidal Dérive
Itinerary – September 1 – 7, 2015
HOPE, BC: September 1st; Put in @ 9:00am, arrive earlier to prepare
Boat Launch at corner of Wardle St. and 7th Ave. in Hope, BC
Travel: 9:00am – 2:00pm
Stop: Fraser River Ecological Reserve
Camp: Kirby Historic Site (near Harrison Mills)
KIRBY SITE: September 2nd; Launch @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop/Camp: Derby Reach Regional Park
DERBY REACH: September 3rd; Launch @ 9:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Stop: Arrive at New Westminster mid-morning
Continue: to coast final point will be determined by tidal flow
September 4: Commute to Salt Spring Island via Ferry.
SALT SPRING ISLAND: September 5th; Put in at Fulford Harbour @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Shell Beach Campsite, Portland Island
PORTLAND ISLAND: September 6th; Launch @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 12:00pm
Camp: Isle de Lis (Rum Island) (only 3 self-service sites)
ISLE-De-LIS/RUM ISLAND: September 7th; Launch @ 7:00am
Travel: 7:00am – 4:00pm
Return to: Salt Spring Island

Further information on the project:

Over the past two years Marie Lorenz has participated in a sequence of residencies at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House resulting in the development of a new Pacific-based series of projects centred on the launch of a handmade boat constructed from driftwood found along Vancouver’s coast line. The boat has since travelled to Northern California where Lorenz completed “tidal derives” in San Francisco with Southern Exposure and most recently along the Russian River with Look Up Gallery in Guerneville, California.

In September the project will culminate in a multi-day dérive with the boat along the Fraser River (Hope to Richmond) and between the Southern Gulf Islands, Lorenz inviting participants to join her along the route. Studying tidal charts of the area, the artist uses tides and currents to direct and drift the navigation of ocean and rivers. This simple act of journeying along the contemporary ecosystem and industrialized commercial port of Fraser offers a different and unfamiliar experience of space for city residents who travel over these bodies of water daily. The experience of floating, of movement controlled by natural forces, adds a specific dimension to one’s own observation: the viewer made aware of their own balance and form as they absorb the details of their surroundings, creating something new from something familiar. The journey will be live-streamed via (website) for the land-bound audience to follow, providing a mediated representation of the visceral experience of the expedition.

Since 2002, Lorenz has been exploring the waterways of New York City in boats that she designs and builds, her work combining psycho-geographic explorations with highly crafted, material forms that explore the intertidal zone. She envisions a city harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore; reorganizing things that we value and representing things that were thrown away. The tide examines the nature of each object with its own incomprehensible order; Lorenz’s driftwood boat a way to gather and record evidence in collaboration with the tide.

————–

The CAG was delighted to welcome back New York-based artist Marie Lorenz to the Burrard Marina Field House as artist-in-residence during May-June 2014.

For this residency, Lorenz is fabricating a new vessel – a handmade boat – from driftwood found along the coastline of the lower mainland and the City of Vancouver. Lorenz first visited Vancouver in December 2013 to begin research for the residency and she has returned again this month to construct and launch of her exciting site-specific project Driftboat.

Lorenz’ artistic practice explores the intertidal zone of cities. She envisions a harbour as a giant centrifuge, spinning things in the tide and redistributing them around its shore. By building and launching a driftwood boat Lorenz is gathering, recording and collaborating with the natural ebb and flow of the environment. Floating out into False Creek and English Bay in the ‘driftboat’ begins a new kind of dialogue, working to reveal the tidal harbour of Vancouver.

As part of her residency, and in participation with the Vancouver Maritime Museum, on Thursday, May 29, Lorenz was in conversation with Vancouver artists Rebecca Bayer and Josh Hite talking about beachcombing, along with local sailor and writer, R. Bruce Macdonald and treasure hunter, Phil Macska. The following Sunday, June 1, Lorenz, Bayer and Hite complemented their talk by hosting two beachcombing workshops with R. Bruce Macdonald and Phil Macska.

Driftboat was constructed then launched in early June with participatory special events, finally travelling down the west coast, to San Francisco to be presented in the exhibition Off Shore at Southern Exposure later this summer.

For this residency we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.

Marie Lorenz – 2013 visit and 2014 project

In  December 2013, Marie Lorenz visited Vancouver to begin research for a project completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Marie Lorenz: Tidal Dérive


Throughout spring 2015 the CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each continuing research toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2015–2016. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Harrell Fletcher
March 2015

Fletcher will develop research rooted in his recent walking projects toward a new piece for Vancouver. In 2013, at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, he developed a four day walk with a group of museum staff, scientists and members of the public. Over forty miles, from the museum across the Bay to Emeryville and the top of Mt Diablo, each participant presented topics related to the areas they were travelling through. Each day featured several official stops while countless unofficial observations added to the experience, additional members of the public connected with the core group at more than a dozen points along the path. By extending the museum’s curiositybased learning into the surrounding landscape, the project aimed to transform the everyday world into an open classroom, working toward a greater integration of the cultural institution within its surrounding community.

Fletcher has produced a variety of socially engaged collaborative and interdisciplinary projects since the early 1990s. His work has been shown at SFMoMA, de Young Museum, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, Yerba Buena Center, all in San Francisco; Berkeley Art Museum; The Drawing Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, and The Sculpture Center, all in New York; PICA, Portland; The Seattle Art Museum; Signal, Malmö, Sweden; Domain de Kerguehennec, France; Tate Modern, London and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. His work was included in the 2004 Whitney Biennial and was the 2005 recipient of the Alpert Award in Visual Arts. From 2002 to 2009 Fletcher co-produced Learning To Love You More, a participatory website with Miranda July. His 2005 exhibition The American War originated at ArtPace in San Antonio, travelling to Solvent Space, Richmond, VA; White Columns, NYC; The Center For Advanced Visual Studies, MIT, Boston; PICA, Portland and LAXART, Los Angeles among other locations. Fletcher is an Associate Professor of Art and Social Practice at Portland State University, Oregon.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Harrell Fletcher


Throughout spring and summer 2015 the CAG is hosting a series of artists-in-residence, each continuing research toward participatory projects to be realized throughout 2015–2016. The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This program moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work, while reaching out to communities and offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists. Running parallel to the residency program are an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

The interdisciplinary practice of Farooq and Linschooten aims to create community-based models of participation in order to reimagine a material record of the present. They investigate tactics of representation — the ideas and values of organizations, claims about what a cultural group is and ought to be, protocols of approaching an object and images of who the intended viewer is — and use installation, photography, documentary filmmaking, writing and the methods of anthropology to examine various forms of collecting, interpreting and display. The result is work that counterbalances how institutions speak about our lives, producing counter-archives; new additions to collections or buried history made visible. Related to these questions Farooq and Linschooten will begin development towards a Vancouver-specific public project engaging the ways Vancouver frames its multiculturalism via ethnographic museum display.

Farooq and Linschooten have exhibited in various countries including Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey. Recent projects include Faux Guide, Trankat, Morocco; The Museum of Found Objects Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario; The Museum of Found Objects Istanbul, Turkish Ministry of Culture; Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue, Artellewa, Egypt. Most recently the duo completed a residency and exhibition at Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga, Ontario which explores the complex space of social codes, ideological agendas and decisions, both conscious and unconscious, of museum display.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Sameer Farooq and Mirjam Linschooten


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Brendan Fernandes


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Broken City Lab


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
– We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 – All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Raymond Boisjoly


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the premiere of The Pixelated Revolution a new performance by Lebanese actor, director, and playwright Rabih Mroué. Mroué’s storytelling pits facts against propaganda imbued with a particular sense of humour and a visual sensibility. By means of a semi-documentary style of theatre, his often-controversial work draws attention to issues and events overlooked in the current political climate of the Middle East. Taking the form of a lecture-performance about the usage of mobile phones during the Syrian revolution, The Pixelated Revolution examines the contemporary and recent phenomenon of photographs made during such events of conflict, broadcast and shared via Facebook and other virtual communication tools, as a means to direct and communicate events to the world.

Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and grunt gallery.

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Rabih Mroué - The Pixelated Revolution


Looking for a Missing Employee is a thoughtful and provocative performance puzzle in which Mroué follows the true story of a man who disappears from his low-level post at the Ministry of Finance in Beirut, never to be seen again. Merging storytelling with live sketching, the artist takes us on a perplexing search for the ‘truth’, littered with a sea of documents, clippings, photos and found objects. The material accumulates under multi-camera live feeds as we are exposed to the ways media shapes public perception, rumours, accusations, political conflicts and scandals. What unfolds is a commentary on the phenomenon of disappearance and proof that “between the truth and a lie, there is but a hair.”

Supported by The Roundhouse. Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and grunt gallery. This tour is made possible through the collaboration of P.S. 122 (New York), On the Boards (Seattle), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis) and The Andy Warhol Museum (Pittsburgh).

Rabih Mroué, Looking for a Missing Employee
The Roundhouse, January 26–28, 8pm
Post-show discussion led by Vanessa Kwan, January 27

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Rabih Mroué - Looking for a Missing Employee


Screening event presented by Patrick Staff and Robin Simpson
Presented by CAG in partnership with Cineworks.

Friday, February 12, 7pm
Cineworks Annex, 235 Alexander Street, Vancouver

Works screened include: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

‘Missives’, is a new free broadsheet publication and an associated film screening event co-programmed by Staff with Canadian curator and writer Robin Simpson. Continuing the format of Staff’s recent screening-performances Dreams of Travel (2014) and Uniform Smoke (2015), this expanded public programming brings together a number of voices that generate resonances with the politics and interpersonal relationships that constitute the project, rather than describing or fixing the meaning of the work. Grounded within a Canadian context, it seeks to forge a connection among Trans/Queer contexts, production, dialogues and communities.

The broadsheet contains specially commissioned texts by Juliet Jacques, Staff and Simpson and will be distributed city wide as well as in Toronto via defunct Xtra newspaper boxes.

Alongside this, the screening event at Cineworks Annex (February 12 from 7pm), invokes a provisional social space, cinema and theatrical set where a temporary community may gather, through which a selection of film and video works explore first person narratives, interview, account and witness in queer Canadian moving image production, and reflect upon our viewing of it in a contemporary context. Presenting older works framed through their practice the evening engages an intergenerational conversation and includes: Mirha Soleil-Ross’ Gender Troublemakers (1993), Xanthra Mackay’s Rupert Remembers (2000), James Diamond’s The Man from Venus (1999), Mike Hoolboom’s Frank’s Cock (1993) and Gwendolyn and Co.’s Prowling by Night (1990).

The MISSIVES broadsheet and screening event are generously supported by the British Council.

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Screening | Missives


Weekend events at CAG as part of ‘For a New Accessibility’ Nov 20 to 22, 2015

When I Walk
Film Screening & Tele-talk with Director: Jason DaSilva
Saturday, November 21: 7-9pm
Free admission

In 2006, 25-year-old Jason DaSilva was on vacation at the beach with family when, suddenly, he fell down. He couldn’t get back up. His legs had stopped working; his disease could no longer be ignored.  Just a few months earlier doctors had told him that he had multiple sclerosis, which could lead to loss of vision and muscle control, as well as a myriad of other complications. Jason tried exercise to help cope, but the problem only worsened. After his dispiriting fall on the beach, he turned to his Mom, who reminded him that, despite his disease, he was still a fortunate kid who had the opportunity to pursue the things he loved most: art and filmmaking. Jason picked up the camera, turned it on his declining body, and set out on a worldwide journey in search of healing, self-discovery, and love.

An emotional documentary filled with unexpected moments of humor and joy, WHEN I WALK is a life-affirming film driven by a young man’s determination to survive—and to make sense of a devastating disease through the art of cinema.

Read more about the film:

http://wheniwalk.com/about/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1395808/

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Film Screening & Tele-talk with Director: Jason DaSilva - When I Walk


FOR A NEW ACCESSIBILITY panel discussion
Sunday, November 22nd 11-1pm

In conjunction with ‘For a New Accessibility’ (November 20-22, 2015) a convergence of artists and activists meeting around the theme of organizing for accessibility and mutual aid produced in partnership with Gallery Gachet and artist Carmen Papalia.

Amanda Cachia, Carmen Papalia, Cheryl L’Hirondelle and Margaret Dragu: moderated by Cecily Nicholson.

The social condition of disability—in which a group or individual is disempowered by the systems that they are in relation to—is an epidemic that effectively marginalizes entire communities with diverse and complex needs. Locally, this oppression plays out in schools, hospitals, cultural institutions, policing, and through various arms of government, making the effort to claim agency a strategic, high-stakes intervention.

The panel will consider a series of propositions as we think/move towards a new accessibility:
-How do we collectively change a/this system of oppression?
-How can we provoke institutional entities to evolve?
-How does our negotiation of access alter our environment?
-What are the tenets of an open model for access?

BIO’s of participants:

Amanda Cachia is an independent curator from Sydney, Australia and is currently completing her PhD in Art History, Theory & Criticism at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation will focus on the intersection of disability and contemporary art. She held the position Director/Curator of the Dunlop Art Gallery in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada from 2007-2010, and has curated approximately 30 exhibitions over the last ten years in various cities across the USA, England, Australia and Canada. http://www.amandacachia.com/

Margaret Dragu works in video, installation, new media & performance art. Dragu’s performancesspan relational, durational, interventionist & community-based works. Her 45+ year practice encompasses writing, dance, theatre anda body/movement teaching that includes dance, aerobics/yoga and personal training specializing in Clinical Exercise. Margaret is also a one-woman TV Station (VERBFRAUTV). a 2012 Laureate of the Canadian Governor-General’s Award for Visual Art and Media, the recipient of City of Richmond’s Most Innovative Artist Award, Ethel Tibbett’s Woman of the Year Award for The Arts, Richmond Women’s Centre’s Inspirational Woman Award & Mall Peepre Award for Outstanding Fitness Leader. She is an internationally famous cleaning lady.

Cheryl L’Hirondelle is an Alberta-born mixed blood (Cree/Metis/German/Polish) community-engaged multi / interdisciplinary artist and singer/songwriter, who has been presenting and exhibiting her work since the 1980’s. Her creative practice investigates a Cree worldview (nêhiyawin) in contemporary time-space. L’Hirondelle uses song, voice, audio and more to develop endurance-based performances, interventions, site-specific installations, participatory projects while she keeps singing and writing songs where ever and with whomever she can. Currently Toronto-based, Cheryl has performed and exhibited her work widely both in Canada and abroad, and her previous musical efforts and new media work have garnered her critical acclaim and numerous awards.

Carmen Papalia is a Social Practice artist who makes participatory projects on the topic of access as it relates to public space, the Art institution and visual culture. His work has been featured as part of exhibitions and engagements at: The Solomon R. Guggenheim museum, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the L.A Craft and Folk Art Museum, the CUE Art Foundation, the Grand Central Art Center, the Portland Art Museum, the Columbus Museum of Art and the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Contemporary Art Gallery, 555 Nelson Street, Vancouver, contact@contemporaryartgallery.ca
www.contemporaryartgallery.ca

Register here: http://gachet.org/for-a-new-accessibility-registration-page/

Program: http://gachet.org/for-a-new-accessibility-program/

Convergence schedule: http://gachet.org/fana-2015-schedule/

===================
Accessibility information
===================

***Locations***

Gallery Gachet
88 E Cordova

front door: 5 feet width
front door step: 6 inch height
ramp: 34 inch width

washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 10 inch clearance on left side
14 inch clearance in front to sink
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://radicalaccessiblecommunities.wordpress.com/2013/05/26/this-audit-of-gallery-gachet-was-performed-on/

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson St

front door: 33 3/4 inch width x 2 (double doors)
no steps at entrance.
washroom door: 33 3/4 inch width
toilet: 11 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B81n0augDG8kfnB2V19uZlpBX0h2MmtKVzBWQThsZ2NiZjlEVzRUUlpLdTRoTlU3aXo3cFU&usp=sharing&tid=0B81n0augDG8kU2NfRlZSa3pIQ00

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House
573 E Hastings

front door: 34 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 31 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Enterprising Women Making Art
800 E Hastings

front door: 33 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
washroom is all genders

***ASL Interpretation***

ASL Interpretation will be offered by default for the following events:

Opening night: 7pm – 9pm Friday November 20th at Gallery Gachet

Bodies in Deliberate Motion lecture: 1:00 – 3:00 pm Saturday, November 21st at Gallery Gachet

For A New Accessibility Panel Discussion: Sunday November 22nd 11:00 – 1:00 pm at CAG

Reverb: A Queer Reading Series: Sunday November 22nd 2:00 – 5:00 pm at CAG

For booking ASL interpretation at any of the other programs of the convergence please email: contact@gachet.org or come visit us in person.

***Scent-reduced Policy***

In order to create a space where folks with multiple chemical sensitivities can participate at all of our venues, please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products (including essential oils) and smoke far away from the entrances to the spaces. To request a For info on how to support folks with multiple chemical sensitivities, visit: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

***Childcare***

Childcare will be offered throughout the convergence. Please remember to let us know in your registration what your childcare needs are.

Image: Carmen Papalia leads a tour as part of a feedback series talk at the CAG in 2014.

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FOR A NEW ACCESSIBILITY - panel discussion


Reverb – readings
Sunday, November 22, 2-5pm

Readers at this REVERB are: Adèle Barclay, Vi Levitt, Hiromi Goto, Lucas Crawford and Kay Ho

In conjunction with ‘For a New Accessibility’ (November 20-22, 2015) a convergence of artists and activists meeting around the theme of organizing for accessibility and mutual aid produced in partnership with Gallery Gachet and artist Carmen Papalia.

REVERB is an anti-oppressive, quarterly reading series for queer writers on unceded Musqueam, Sḵwxwú7mesh, and Tsleil-Waututh land. All our writers self-identify on a spectrum of queerness that centres trans* and femme experiences. All of our events are held in physically and financially accessible spaces, and with every event, we make at least one change to ensure that REVERB becomes more and more accessible. We promise to do all we can to create a safer space — bring your suggestions! Check your assumptions at the door; REVERB is a body-positive, anti-racist, anti-sexist, and hella queer- and trans-positive event. http://reverbqueerreadingseries.weebly.com/

Accessibility information:

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson Street

front door: 33 3/4 inch width
no steps at entrance.
washroom door: 33 3/4 inch width
toilet: 11 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: Accessibility Audit for CAG
ASL interpretation will be provided.

In order to create a space where folks with multiple chemical sensitivities can participate at all of our venues, please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products (including essential oils) and smoke far away from the entrances to the spaces. To request a For info on how to support folks with multiple chemical sensitivities, visit: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

Childcare will be offered. Please let us know in your FANA registration what your childcare needs are.

LINKS:

http://gachet.org/event/for-a-new-accessibility/

Full Schedule: http://gachet.org/fana-2015-schedule/
===================
Accessibility information
===================

***Locations***

Gallery Gachet
88 E Cordova

front door: 5 feet width
front door step: 6 inch height
ramp: 34 inch width

washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 10 inch clearance on left side
14 inch clearance in front to sink
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://radicalaccessiblecommunities.wordpress.com/2013/05/26/this-audit-of-gallery-gachet-was-performed-on/

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson St

front door: 33 3/4 inch width
no steps at entrance.
washroom door: 33 3/4 inch width
toilet: 11 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Full audit available at this link: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B81n0augDG8kfnB2V19uZlpBX0h2MmtKVzBWQThsZ2NiZjlEVzRUUlpLdTRoTlU3aXo3cFU&usp=sharing&tid=0B81n0augDG8kU2NfRlZSa3pIQ00

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House
573 E Hastings

front door: 34 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 31 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
the washroom has a handrail
washroom is all genders

Enterprising Women Making Art
800 E Hastings

front door: 33 inch width
no steps at entrance
washroom door: 33 inch width
toilet: 12 inch clearance on left side
washroom is all genders

***ASL Interpretation***

ASL Interpretation will be offered by default for the following events:

Opening night: 7pm – 9pm Friday November 20th at Gallery Gachet

Bodies in Deliberate Motion lecture: 1:00 – 3:00 pm Saturday, November 21st at Gallery Gachet

For A New Accessibility Panel Discussion: Sunday November 22nd 11:00 – 1:00 pm at CAG

Reverb: A Queer Reading Series: Sunday November 22nd 2:00 – 5:00 pm at CAG

For booking ASL interpretation at any of the other programs of the convergence please email: contact@gachet.org or come visit us in person.

***Scent-reduced Policy***

In order to create a space where folks with multiple chemical sensitivities can participate at all of our venues, please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products (including essential oils) and smoke far away from the entrances to the spaces. To request a For info on how to support folks with multiple chemical sensitivities, visit: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

***Childcare***

Childcare will be offered throughout the convergence. Please remember to let us know in your registration what your childcare needs are.

MORE

Reverb – readings


Panel Discussion: Sustenance Festival
With Randy Lee Cutler, Holly Schmidt, Gaye Chan, Derya Akay and Keg de Souza
Saturday, October 17, 3pm

In conjunction with the Sustenance Festival: a city-wide festival with local food-focused workshops, exhibitions and talks, CAG has organized a panel examining artistic practices that consider food security, sovereignty and knowledge sharing. www.sustenancefestival.ca

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Panel Discussion: Sustenance Festival


Feedback Series Events: Tad Hozumi
Saturday, June 6, 13 and 27, 4pm

Hozumi is a Vancouver-based artist and hip hop therapist, involved in local street dance culture and currently working on a body of photo, installation, social intervention and performance work that explores the history of struggle coded in to the subversive vocabulary of street style dances. Responding to the pop culture references of Julia Dault’s paintings he will curate a collection of records, on June 6 and 13 he will conduct a series of participatory movement workshops building on his selections. On June 27 Hozumi will give a talk on the practice of crate digging AKA record collecting and play a live set.

Tad Hosumi: vinyl + music blog “Back Ground Music” http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com

Tad Hozumi’s feedback events reflect his experiences as an artist, deejay and movement based therapist he will respond to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition ‘Blame It On the Rain’ by playfully referencing elements found in her work.

Hozumi has resourced his record collection in search for albums such as ‘Sweet Hone’ in the Rock’s Self-Titled; Brian Auger’s ‘Oblivion Express Live Oblivion’; Donny Hathaway’s ‘Extensions of a Man’ and Gino Soccio ‘Outline’. For Hozumi these records resonate with Dault’s work and inform the two movement based participatory events. The first class will be led by disco dancer and yoga teacher, Gary Quon. The second movement class will be based on expressive movements led by Hozumi. He will also host an artist talk and deejay an event to cap off the feedback series.

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE! Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

Feedback Talks:
This series invites cultural and critical producers to present thoughts and ideas rooted in their own interests and practices, and invites audiences to join in the conversations that will explore relevant contemporary issues, theories, ideas and culture.

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Feedback Series Events: Tad Hozumi


Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly hosts a talk and discussion with Nathan Crompton.

Nathan Crompton co-editor of The Mainlander, will speak about the history of the land where Vanier Park and the Burrard Marina Field House are located, previously the Kitsilano Reserve. 2013 marks the 100 year anniversary of the dispossession and displacement of the reserve.

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Field House Talk | Nathan Crompton hosted by Raymond Boisjoly


Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street
Open call: Visual Art Summer Youth Intensive
Arts Umbrella, Contemporary Art Gallery and SFU collaboration
August 8 to 26, 2016

Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street is a three week visual arts intensive speci cally designed for youth between the age of 14 and 19 interested in developing their visual art practice.

It will provide a stimulating and challenging experience for young artists committed to experimentation and pushing the boundaries of their own art making in a supportive studio environment.

Youth will have the opportunity to work with leading artists, curators and educators in Vancouver as they explore and produce a range of contemporary art practices such as the context-speci c installation, large-scale collaborative sculptures and exhibition making. Participants will engage in critiques and discussions about developing ideas, working with materials and viewing works of art.

The program will culminate in a one-day exhibition at CAG.

Application Deadline: Monday, June 6, 2016 for accepting applications. Space is limited, please apply soon. The fee for the intensive is $480.00.

Application forms are available at http://www.artsumbrella.com/vasi

For more information about the program, please contact: Holly Schmidt, Assistant Curator at h.schmidt@ contemporaryartgallery.ca

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Inside Out: Studio, Gallery, Street Open call: Visual Art Summer Youth Intensive


Night School is a program for new collectors and contemporary art enthusiasts, an introductory contemporary art survey that is intentionally accessible, intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Lectures by instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world. A suggested reading list will complement the discussion program. Along with the lectures, the participants will also engage in three studio visits with internationally recognized local artists including: Vikky Alexander, Gareth Moore, Elizabeth McIntosh, and tours of exhibitions by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun – Unceded Territories at the Museum of Anthropology and upcoming exhibition, MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Wednesday March 16, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 1 – The French Salon

Sunday March 20, 3:30-5:00 pm
Studio Visit 1 with Vikky Alexander

Wednesday March 23, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 2 – Matter Is Meaning

March 23 – April 2
Easter Reading Week Break (no session)

Sunday April 3, 3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibition Visit – MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture
Vancouver Art Gallery

Sunday April 10, 3:30-5:00 pm
Studio Visit 2 with Elizabeth McIntosh

Wednesday April 13, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 3 – Absorbing Abstractions

Sunday April 24, 3:30-5:00 pm
Studio Visit 3 with Gareth Moore

Wednesday April 27, 7:30-9:00 pm
Lecture 4 – Surrealism and Other Truths

Friday May 6, 6:00-7:00 pm
Exhibition preview for Jochen Lempert

Sunday May 15, 12:30
Curator’s Tour – Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Museum of Anthropology

Cost: $375, includes a complimentary CAG membership.

Payments can also be made by monthly installments.

Space is limited – 20 seats – filling up fast!

To register contact Kristin Cheung, Development Officer at k.cheung@contemporaryartgallery.ca or call 604 681 2700.

 

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Night School IV


Artist talk by Canadian artist Shannon Bool. Bool discussed her recent installation at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Flight of the Medici Mamluk and her new CAG commission Michelangelo’s Place alongside recent projects.

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Artist Talk | Shannon Bool


In this artist talk, Meric Algün Ringborg discusses her practice, exploring the critical underpinning and key themes of her work.

She exhibited at the CAG in 2013 with the solo exhibition Metatext  is currently featured in La Biennale di Venezia 2015, the 56th International exhibition.

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Artist Talk | Meriç Algün Ringborg


Jürgen Partenheimer
Thursday, May 8, 6pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

This special event involves multiple voices approaching notions of abstraction from a variety of poetic, philosophical and theoretical standpoints by Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence Jürgen Partenheimer. Born in Munich in 1947, Partenheimer studied the theory and practice of art in Germany, the USA, Mexico and France. As a representative of a subjective abstraction, he is considered one of the most important contemporary artists of Germany. With theory, poetry and prose as his referential grammar for artistic expression, Partenheimer’s work encompasses painting, drawing, sculpture and text. Marked by a post-minimalist background and a poetic intensity, his art has been referred to as metaphysical realism. He became internationally renowned following his participation in the Paris, Venice and São Paulo Biennials, and in 2000 became the first contemporary German artist to have a retrospective in China at the National Museum of Art in Beijing. His work has been part of major exhibitions including The Museum of Modern Art in New York and San Francisco, the Miró Foundation in Barcelona and the Museum Ludwig in Cologne.

Featuring guest appearances by Nigel Prince, Nicholas Lea, Mayko Nguyen and Aoife MacNamara.

Partenheimer’s work has received many national and international prizes and awards, among others the Art Critics’ Prize of Madrid, Spain; the NEA Grant, National Endowment of the Arts, New York; Canada Council Grant, Montréal and the Federal Cross of Merit of Germany for outstanding international achievement. Partenheimer has taught as Professor, Distinguished Visiting Professor and Visiting artist among others at San Francisco Art Institute; Academy of Fine Arts, Düsseldorf, University of California at Davis; Rijks Academy in Amsterdam; Royal College of Art, Edinburgh; Rhode Island School of Design and WITS School of Arts in Johannesburg.

Partenheimer’s residency at Emily Carr takes place from February – May, 2014 in preparation for an exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery in the fall of 2014. The exhibition in Vancouver forms part of an open cooperation with the Pinakothek der Moderne München (The Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Munich); Falckenberg Collection, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg and the Gemeentemuseum The Hague, exploring site and space-related installation concepts. Parallel to the different exhibitions, all of which will be held in 2014, the participating institutions closely worked on a publication with the artist that aims at commenting on and integrating the various aspects of his work as an additional ‘fifth room’. International authors from a variety of different disciplines, including Anne Carson, Lebogang Mashile, Carla Schulz-Hoffmann, Antje v. Graevenitz, John Burnside, Oswald Egger and Rudi Fuchs, have taken up the invitation to write contributions and become involved in this project. Published by Distanz Publishers, Berlin, 2014.

Established in 2012, the Audain Distinguished Artist in Residence Program has a mandate to bring nationally and internationally renowned contemporary artists to Vancouver, create curriculum specific to each individual visiting artist, and support the creation of new works. Adopting a flexible model that encourages experimentation, collaboration, dialogue and engagement, the program will benefit artists, the academic community, the Vancouver art community at large, and will greatly contribute to Vancouver’s stature within the international art world. The Program, housed within the Audain School of Visual Arts encompassing the Faculty of Visual Arts + Material Practice, provides support for two artists per year to live and work in Vancouver for a one to three month period, and includes living and travel expenses, support for production costs, exhibitions and honoraria.

Please note that Aoife MacNamara’s reading has been removed due to technical difficulties. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenient.

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Video | Jürgen Partenheimer - Renga: Dimensions of Abstraction


CJSF interns Ana Costa + Anh Dang interview New York visual and video artist Maryam Jafri about her work AVALON (2011), which is Contemporary Art Gallery’s June 2014 exhibition The Act Of Seeing With One’s Own Eyes.

Jafri weaves themes of production, representation and role playing throughout her work.

Aired originally on CJSF’s Spoken Word Surprise July 1st (Tuesday 4pm)

Includes notes from CAG curator and excerpts from the June 26th artist talk.

www.maryamjafri.net/

Talk info + audio: www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/learning/a…yam-jafri/

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CJSF Radio interview with Maryam Jafri


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm

Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri. Her video work Avalon (2011) is included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

In her moving image works, Jafri blurs the distinction between scripted films and unscripted documentaries. In Avalon (2011), Jafri seamlessly weaves together stories from real life workers in an unnamed leather company in an unspecified Asian country, with a script that she wrote herself. The workers in this factory are not told that they are making fetish products to be sold to the masses in the United States, and this selective disclosure can be seen in the disconnect between the production process and the final product itself. Parallels can be made between the secretive nature within the leather factory, the viewer’s unsurety of who is an actor and who is not, as well as to the overall editing process which yields a carefully restrained video work about the complex topics of overseas factories and the world of fetish paraphernalia.

Jafri’s solo exhibitions include: Mouthfeel, Gasworks, London (2014); Backdrop, Bielefelder kustverein, Bielefeld, Germany (2013); Stages, WYSPA Institute of Art, Gdansk (2012); Geographies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde (2012); Headlines and Small Print (with Anderas Fogarasi), Galerie Nova/WHW Zagreb (2012); Global Slum, Beirut, Cairo (2012) and Shanghai Biennial and Taipei Biennial (2012). She has also exhibited in group exhibitions including: Fassbinder Jetzt – Fassbinder and Contemporary Art, Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt (2013); Past is Present (Murals), Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Ten Thousand Wiles, Hundred Thousand Tricks, MuKHA, Antwerp (2013); When Attitudes Became Forms Become Attitudes, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Manifesta 9, Genk (2012). Maryam Jafri lives and works in New York and Copenhagen. She holds a BA in Literature from Brown University, an MA from NYU/Tisch School of The Arts and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

www.maryamjafri.net/avalon.htm

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Artist Talk | Maryam Jafri


As part of our Feedback series acclaimed Toronto-based artist Luis Jacob responded to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition ‘Fröbel Fröbeled’, he also discussed his own practice and his interest in pedagogical ideas contained in the exhibition.

Luis Jacob is an artist based in Toronto, whose diverse practice addresses social interaction and the subjectivity of aesthetic experience.  Realized as painting, video, installation, photography and actions in the public sphere, Jacob’s work invites a collision of meaning systems that destabilize our conventions of viewing and that open up possibilities for engagement and the creation of knowledge.

As an artist, he has achieved an international reputation – particularly since his participation in documenta12, curated by Ruth Noack and Roger Bürgel in 2007.  Several significant solo exhibitions include Kunstverein Hamburg (curated by Meike Behm and Yilmaz Dziewior in 2008) ; Städtisches Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (curated by Suzanne Titz in 2009); Fonderie Darling, Montréal (curated by Marie Fraser in 2010); Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto (curated by David Liss in 2011); and Kunsthalle Lingen (curated by Meike Behm in 2012). Jacob’s work was also featured in group exhibitions at the Taipei Biennial (2012); Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2012); Witte de With Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2012); Generali Foundation, Vienna (2011); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2010); Contemporary Art Museum, Houston (2010); Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Philadelphia (2009); Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst (MuHKA), Antwerp (2008); Barbican Art Gallery, London (2008); and The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto (2008). His work is found in the permanent collection of the Generali Foundation (Vienna, Austria); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa, Canada); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, USA); Städtisches Museum Abteiberg (Mönchengladbach, Germany); Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Canada); Museion‚ Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (Bolzano, Italy); Agnes Etherington Art Centre (Kingston, Canada); Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto, Canada); and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, University of Toronto (Toronto, Canada).

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Luis Jacob


Kelowna born Shirreff presented a talk on her exhibition Pictures and discussed her interest in differing encounters between representations of image and object. Erin Shirreff’s solo exhibition, Pictures,  at the Contemporary Art Gallery was the first presentation dedicated exclusively to the artist’s film and video work.

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Artist Talk | Erin Shirreff


Brendan Fernandes
Tuesday, June 10, 7pm

Brendan Fernandes is a Canadian artist of Kenyan and Indian descent based between Toronto and New York City.
In this artist talk introducing Fernandes’ residency, he discussed his recent projects. This summer the CAG hosts a two month residency with Brendan Fernandes. At the core of the artist’s practice lies an investigation into the concept of authenticity, an ideological construct as a shaper of cultural experience.

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Artist Talk | Brendan Fernandes


Romanian artist Ciprian Muresan discusses his work. Presented in collaboration with Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Ciprian Muresan


Boisjoly is an Aboriginal artist of Haida and Québécois descent based in Vancouver, BC. His practice engages the representation of Aboriginality through vernacular materials, photography and especially text-based work combining contemporary craft, pop references and street art with various cultural signifiers of traditional Northwest Coast imagery. His talk considered the varied intersections of history, technology, and cultural practice as the central concern of his current work marking the beginning of his residency at the Burrard Marina Field House. Presented in collaboration with Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist talk | Raymond Boisjoly


Los Angeles based artist Matthew Monahan gives a formal lecture on his work exploring the major themes in his practice. This talk coincided with Monahan’s first solo exhibition in Canada and highlights Monahan’s interest in the interplay between two and three dimensions, between drawing and materiality, infused with personal mythology and a self reflective look at the conventions of museum display.

Presented in partnership with Graduate Studies at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Matthew Monahan


Artist Matthew Monahan is interviewed by Curator and Educator Heidi Reitmaier about his work and his exhibition ‘Matthew Monahan’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, April 27 to July 1, 2012. Video by Adrian Buitenhuis

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Video | Matthew Monahan


In this talk, artist Josephine Meckseper discussed her practice exploring the relationship between politics and consumerism. This event was presented in partnership with SFU Woodward’s Cultural Programs. The talk was held at Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Third floor, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Josephine Meckseper


This video interview with Irish artist Sarah Browne was created by Jessica Foley to coincide with the exhibition ‘How To Use Fool’s Gold’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, July 13 to September 2, 2012.

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Video | Sarah Browne


Artist Sarah Browne discusses her work with CAG Director Nigel Prince, at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Sarah Browne


Artist Nicolas Sassoon talks on his work and his exhibition WAVES at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Nicolas Sassoon


Endless Endless:
Robert Orchardson and Corin Sworn in-conversation with Richard Henriquez and Leslie Van Duzer

An in-conversation event between artists Orchardson and Sworn with architect Richard Henriquez and Leslie Van Duzer, Director and Professor, School of Architecture and Landscape
Architecture, UBC. Discussion will centre on topics of redundancy, memory and shifts in value and meaning over time.

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Endless Endless: Robert Orchardson and Corin Sworn in-conversation with Richard Henriquez and Leslie Van Duzer


An in conversation event moderated by Jenifer Papararo. Following brief presentations by the artists, discussions centred around the artists’ practices, works on display and focused on issues of process, use of performance and the reversal of subject/author roles.

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Artist Talk | Ruti Sela, Maayan Amir & Sharon Hayes


American artist Sharon Hayes discusses her exhibition In The Near Future at the CAG, April 8 – June 5, 2011.

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Video | Sharon Hayes


Artist and writer Frances Stark discusses her feature length animation film ‘My Best Thing’, shown at the Contemporary Art Gallery from Feb 3 to April 15, 2012.

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Video | Frances Stark


Danish Artist Jeppe Hein discusses his work and his CAG exhibition Please Please Please in an artist talk held at Emily Carr University of Art + Design on Friday January 30, 2009. The talk is introduced by Christina Ritchie then Executive Director of the CAG and curator of the exhibition Please Please Please.

links: www.jeppehein.net

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Artist Talk | Jeppe Hein


Coast Salish artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun talks about his practice at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun


Federico Herrero discusses his CAG exhibition “Vibrantes”, September 9, 2011 to January 15, 2012.
Video production by Adrian Buitenhuis.

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Video | Federico Herrero


Eli Bornowsky Interviews Elizabeth McIntosh (Part 1 of 2)

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Video | Eli Bornowsky & Elizabeth McIntosh (Part 1)


Eli Bornowsky interviews Elizabeth McIntosh on the occasion of the exhibition – Eli Bornowsky: Walking, Square, Cylinder, Plane – November 26 – January 22, 2011
© Contemporary Art Gallery, The Western Front and The Artists, 2011.

 

 

 

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Video | Elizabeth McIntosh & Eli Bornowsky (Part 2)


Dexter Sinister discuss the exhibition An Invitation to An Infiltration, 2010. An ideal context for an examination of the competitive nature of group exhibitions was during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Organized by guest curator Eric Fredericksen, An Invitation to An Infiltration was a group exhibition of local and international artists ranging from emerging to established.

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Video | Dexter Sinister


Holly Ward discusses her work in the group exhibition An Invitation to An Infiltration, 2010. An ideal context for an examination of the competitive nature of group exhibitions was during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Organized by guest curator Eric Fredericksen, An Invitation to An Infiltration was a group exhibition of local and international artists ranging from emerging to established.

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Video | Holly Ward


The Vancouver Art/Book Fair is currently on from October 17th to 18th, presented by Project Space at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The two-day event is free and open to the public, and offers a chance to browse and purchase printed matter (as well as digital, experimental and performative forms of publication) from local, national and international artists. It also features performances, programs and other unique artist projects. Leading up to this weekend, Project Space also organized Artists’ Books Week, an ‘open-source’ style series of events. As part of this, the CAG hosted an artist talk by Vancouver-based artist Ho Tam, who discussed his recent publications, including his hotam and Poser series.

Ho Tam is interested in experimenting with the printed format. He uses this medium to explore issues relevant to him in an effectively humorous way, using the model of the mass-distributed magazine to mimic popular print culture.  His first artist book, The Yellow Pages, confronts stereotypes often associated with Chinese culture. The Poser series are collections of photographs which showcase a specific group of people in a certain place, for example, images of men at the Canadian National Exhibition with their carnival game winnings—stuffed animals. His hotam series features self-titled issues that play with pun and humour, somehow always relating to the artist and his own lived experience. Issue 2, Other People’s Business, includes his abundant collection of business cards. Issue 5, Hot Asian Men, showcases the artist`s various photographs, clippings, and movie posters of just that.

Ho Tam’s publications: The Yellow Pages and hotam #1 are available for purchase on our website and in the CAG bookshop. Visit the book fair this weekend and enjoy more artist made publications!

More open-source events like this can be found on the VA/BF website, along with more information about the book fair itself.
Visit www.hotampress.com for more on Ho Tam’s publications.

– Kelli

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Ho Tam on hotam: Artists’ Books Week – Vancouver Art/Book Fair 2015


The CAG has invited artist, deejay and movement based therapist Tad Hozumi to create a series of feedback events and workshops in response to Julia Dault’s paintings in her exhibition Blame It On the Rain.

His upcoming series of music and movement workshops and events will playfully reference elements found in her work.

Here Hozumi writes, the first in a series of blog reports, about his work and about preparing for the events and workshops:

Last weekend I installed a listening station for a selection of funk and disco vinyl records in the CAG bookshop (see above image). This listening station is part of my feedback response to the current exhibition: Julia Dault’s Blame It On the Rain. My initial task was to curate a selection of records that responded to Dault’s works and that served as the inspiration for a series of workshops. The curatorial method I undertook was really simple: Rhythms x Patterns x Geometry x Materials. Dault’s eye is similar to that of a crate-digger, she is constantly scanning the visible ‘debris’ in our environment for moments of resonance.

Crate-digging, if I can give the most romantic definition, is the practice of scouring through dusty bins of long forgotten music to unearth rare or special records. There are a lot of great crate-diggers out there, including Japan’s DJ Muro or Vancouver’s own Sipreano, who recently released Native North America Vol. 1 – Aboriginal Folk, Rock, And Country 1966–1985, a project that I am sure will go down as something of historical importance in our time.

Not all crate-diggers have an active public life, deejay or compile music. If I had to guess most are actually very private, sharing their collections with a few people who are willing to bear them in order to get a sneak peak at an unknown gem. There is one thing I am pretty sure of, digging while mysterious, certainly is not glamorous.

As a crate-digger, I’m just a baby. It’s exciting, because almost everything I come across is new to me. Perusing bins at a thrift shop will almost always turn up some new discoveries. I used to think I had a pretty good handle on music. I was wrong. I think the current statistic is that over 80% of recorded music on vinyl is unavailable digitally. So crate-digging can expand the musical world you live in quite a bit.

The record in the above picture (click on the arrow for the slideshow) is Outline – Gino Soccio. A really top notch Montreal disco record. It was actually one of  first five records I randomly bought in a thrift store. Man, I was happy when I first heard the slick beat on Dancer. Somehow I felt like this omniscient being who could magically discover dope records. Being able to visually locate the sensibility of an album without any audio information is a big part of crate-digging.

After I bought Soccio’s album, when I was about 1,000 records deep in to my collection, I realized that the album was pretty common. A great album for sure, but not necessarily a spectacular or rare find that I thought I had made. I now have three copies of Outline and a 7” of Dancer. Still, I have a lot of emotions attached to Soccio’s first release.

Any ways, you can listen here to Dancer. A real classic. Thumping.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3y2C8jqG8Q

Other albums selected for this project are:

Extensions of a Man
– Donny Hathaway
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9Uydcm0CgQ

Encounters Of Every Kind – Meco
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kvFGFbA6LI

Sweet honey: in the rock (Self-Titled)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pQW95XPmCY

A Fifth of Beethoven – Walter Murphy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y67xr124DC4

Live Oblivion – Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGa8SCTKXsA

I hope you will come by the CAG and enjoy listening to the above records in person

This is my music + vinyl blog.
http://bgmdiscotheque.tumblr.com/

– Tad Hozumi

__________

Join Tad Hozumi at these upcoming feedback events: 

Yoga Boogie
Saturday, June 6th, 4pm
Yoga Boogie, a unique hybrid practice developed by Quon combines his passion for dance and yoga. Using songs curated from Hozumi’s collection, Quon will lead a dynamic session that will begin on the mat and get you up and grooving! Be prepared to BOOGIE!
Gary Quon is a yoga practitioner who specializes in Kundalini style and a well-recognized disco dancer (waacking). Quon’s practice often incorporates elements of rhythm and dance along with the kriyas resulting in an uplifting and energetic practice.

*This session will be available for the first 15 people – Please register to save your spot at learning@contemporaryartgallery.ca
*Please bring your own yoga mat.

Body Jazz
Sat, June 13th, 4pm
This movement-based session is about becoming mindful of how music and visual stimuli resonate within our bodies, by letting impulses that we discover from the music and Dault’s artworks move us around the gallery space.
*This session will be available for the first 15 people

Artist Talk and DJ Session
June 27th,  4pm
Music Back Ground (talk) and Back Ground Music (party). Hozumi will speak about fan videos of Mariah Carey, deejaying indie dance parties in the 2000s, making video game music, finding himself in hip hop and (re)discovering crate-digging. After the talk he will play a deejayed set of some unique records from his collection of jazz, soft pop/rock, disco, funk and more, weaving around the albums that were selected for the feedback series.

 

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‘Crate-digging for Julia Dault’ by Tad Hozumi


This is the second installment in a series of three parts of a Q&A that Patrick O’Neill conducted with Jeremy Shaw. Part 1 can be found here.

Patrick O’Neill: The soundtrack seems to occupy a pivotal role in both films in this exhibition. To what extent has your artistic practice been informed by your experiences with Circlesquare and vice versa?

Jeremy Shaw: As far as my skill sets go, [sound design] has been a massive influence.  I spent countless hours/days/months working on Circlesquare music – experimenting with production, writing and recording, learning programs, samplers, instruments, etc.  All of this is all very useful in technical ways with how I am working now.  I used to really try and keep these two practices separate, but since disbanding Circlesquare I’ve felt a real freedom to use music in a much more present way in my art works. I brainstorm in both a visual and musical way – rarely do I think of one without the other.

PO: You seem to be quite conscious of the power of technology to inscribe or convey belief structures to the viewers or users of those technologies. Is this idea simply of personal interest, or is it something you try to explicitly acknowledge in your works?

JS: It’s a device I use as a way to lure a viewer into something via an assumed awareness.  Their personal understanding of/relationship to the technology puts them somewhat at my disposal to subvert that familiarity; to propose something new via this comfort.  It is definitely acknowledged in the works – for example, in Variation FQ, the first 3 minutes are mono sound and the antiquated 16mm image authentically mimics a 1960’s aesthetic.  If one was not to know of contemporary voguing, they could believe this was an archival work.  But at 3 minutes in when Leiomy takes her hair out, the audio switches dramatically to surround sound and an MP3 quality digital sound is introduced while she shakes her head in a way that would be difficult to believe was shot anytime before the late 1980’s.  So here the projector and media and music all come into question as no longer endorsing the initial set-up.  I like the idea of collapsing time this way.

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UBC Intern Patrick O’Neill in conversation with Jeremy Shaw | Part 2 of 3


The CAG is excited to welcome back Burrard Marina Field House Studio resident Keg de Souza this evening with a screening of her film, If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood… The film, which De Souza created during her artist residency with Kunci Cultural Studies Centre in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, explores the gentrification of a neighbourhood located alongside Yogyakarta’s main river, Kali Code. In the 1970s, the Kampung Ratmakan (neighbourhood) was built by squatters on a graveyard – a characteristic that continues to affect the community living there today. Ghosts are often seen by local residents and the community relies on a local ghost expert to move the ghosts out of their houses. In 2013 the mayor announced plans to develop the area and now the residents, like the ghosts, are beginning to be displaced. In addition to the film, De Souza worked alongside the residents of Kampung Ratmakan to create an inflatable ghost house (pictured above). The interior of the ghost house features embroidered ghost stories created from drawings made by some of the local children during a ghost story workshop.

We hope to see you there!

Screening:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Wednesday, March 18th, 7pm
Burrard Marina Field House

Film credits:
If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…
Keg de Souza
2014
Duration: 31:45
Single channel HD video, sound, mirrors
Indonesian and Javanese with English subtitles

Interviewees: Pak Kuncung, Ikbal, Pak Antok, Mas Anton, Pak Remi, Budeh Kom, Mbah Endang, Ibu Toko, Ersa, Pak Agus, Sania, Mak Yem.
Translator/ community liaison: Invani Lela Herliana
Sound recordist: Lucas Abela
Original music: Pawang Hantu by Senyawa
Post sound: Timothy Dwyer
Subtitling: Invani Lela Herliana, Rully Shabara

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Keg de Souza – If There’s Something Strange In Your Neighbourhood…


As our contribution to Vancouver Design Week, the CAG worked with James Langdon, recipient of the 2012 Inform Award for Conceptual Design, presented by the Museum of Contemporary Art Leipzig, Germany. Langdon presented a short course and workshop in reading objects, environments and messages. Stimulated by the curious genre of design fiction, the programme asserts storytelling as the primary function of design. Langdon conducted a three day workshop on September 16–18 exploring narrative approaches to design, a series of connected exercises subjecting a collection of found materials to various manual and conceptual processes.

CAG volunteer Sara Khan writes about her experiences taking part in the three day workshop:

 

As an artist who enjoys telling stories through two dimensional media, the School for Design fiction workshop caught my attention; I was curious about what fiction through design could entail. On our first day we were asked to bring in three objects, organic or designed. People brought along things ranging from eggshells and apples to metal birds, buttons, bottles, and moth traps.

Before we started working on the activity set for the day James Langdon had us watch a short film. It replayed the same event but with slight variations with each iteration. A human figure used different objects in unconventional ways, from dumping food on a laptop to sitting on a book instead of reading it. At a glance the human figure came across a sort of a machine that had malfunctioned. Mulling over the film afterward made me wonder about why objects around us are operated the way they are and have a specific function or name, how come we almost use them like robots not really questioning their history, form or task.

Once we started talking about the objects we’d brought along and the workshop progressed; I realised more and more that in the everyday structure and organization of things and lives, we had forgotten to ponder the existence of what surrounds us. It reminded me of Sartre’s Antoine in “Nausea” and how he wonders about the bark of a tree and why it is considered to be black.

As we arranged and rearranged the items with each other, we saw how meaning was added to or subtracted from them. One of the last exercises led some of us to completely deconstruct the objects we were working with; which resulted in a lot of them either being completely stripped off their meaning or not changing at all, which was interesting to see.

By the end of the workshop though, I think, perhaps we were reading too much into everything, as humans often do; put anything before us and we’ll make up a story. At this point we watched a documentary about the Piltdown man. The film reminded me of the story of the Emperor’s New Clothes.

It is amazing how if you put forth a thought with enough conviction and confidence most people will believe it as the truth. It makes me wonder what falsehoods lurk in our histories.

So, as we wonder in awe at the totality of this existence, it is important to question the things we experience.

– Sara Khan

Check out a selection of books by James Langdon in the CAG book shop, on a specially dedicated shelf.

School for design fiction workbook

More Books by James Langdon.

James Langdon
A School for Design Fiction – workshop
16-18 September 2014, 6pm-9pm

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Sara Khan – The School for Design Fiction – A workshop with James Langdon


Last week I attended my first artist talk as the CAG’s Learning and Public Program assistant. New York and Toronto- based artist Brendan Fernandes is currently in Vancouver for a two month residency at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio.

While in residence Fernandes will be developing a new solo dance piece, co-mentoring a summer intensive youth dance program, and leading a life drawing class that focuses on the dancer’s foot. On Tuesday, June 10th Fernandes gave an artist talk at the CAG where he led us through the creation, rehearsal, and performance processes of his recent works; The Working Move (2012), Encomium (2011), and Night Shift (2011).

(Find out more about Fernandes’ past and upcoming works on his website at www.brendanfernandes.ca)

Brendan’s talk was as charming and insightful as his work, which engages with various disciplines including visual arts, dance, performance and theatre. He explained how his work focuses on corporal and embodied lived experiences—which raises questions about “liveness versus stillness”, “space and audience” and “single action versus relational action”. The focus on the body challenges us to re-examine the aesthetics of his works—how do we react as spectators when the body becomes the object, the subject, the artifact and the archive? Fernandes’ works question how we conceive the space, time and performative codes of bodies moving in gallery and museum spaces. I’m stoked to follow Fernandes’ process this summer and find out how the new projects are shaping up!

– Lindsay Lachance

Click here for: Information regarding his Youth Intensive Dance Workshop

Listen to the artist talk here:

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Brendan Fernandes Talks the Talk and Talks About the Dancer’s Walk


Fresh in town from originally Windsor, via Montreal, Justin Langlois gave a talk at the Burrard Marina Field House about his ideas and his work on Saturday, August 17th. He brought with him a pamphlet of thought-provoking slices of his personal and artistic philosophy, which he flipped through over the duration of the talk as a prompt for further musings and discussion. He’s happy to share it with us in the images above, along with a video he made titled ‘Windsor is Forever’.

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Limits & Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life – by Justin Langlois


Nathan Crompton gave a lecture and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field House on Saturday, September 28th. We asked him a few questions in preparation for the event, and are now bringing you the second half of the session (the first part can be found here). We’re grateful for the insight and perspective that Nathan brings to this crucial and ever-timely subject matter and look forward to further expanding this dialogue with him and the community.

JB: For people who may not understand the complexity of the power relations embedded in gentrification and may therefore see neighbourhood improvement as simply that, how would you explain to them that the “polishing up” comes at a high cost to a basic, and long-compromised human right—especially for the (large) indigenous population of the area?

NC: That’s a difficult question. I might only be able to point to a contradiction. Currently our neoliberal cities are crumbling before our eyes, with the massive de-funding of basic services both in terms of the human and architectural infrastructure. I’m talking about an entire generation of infrastructure left behind by the welfare state, whether it’s Simon Fraser University, Heather Place or Little Mountain – they’re all in shambles as the war on the poor and working class intensifies. Social democracy, with all of its flaws and compromises – particularly its framework of patriarchal white supremacy – has now been replaced by neoliberalism.

Neoliberal urbanism states that improvements to the city can only be supported if they are funded privately, first by private capital and secondly by the retroactive bonuses, tax cuts and fee exemptions created by the municipal colonial state. Since being elected, Vision Vancouver has taken this model to its highest possible level, setting in motion an entire bureaucracy whose sole purpose is to move social funds upwards, particularly (but not exclusively) for the monopoly developers who fund the political apparatus. So the axiom of our generation is revitalization and improvements, yes, but the precondition is that these improvements only for those who can afford it, under the guise of urban revitalization. It is therefore hard today to discuss urban improvements in an abstract way, detached from class and colonialism. Who is benefitting from revitalization, who is losing out? Does it always have to be the propertied class who determine what is the “highest and best use”? Real-estate knows how to follow through on a process of colonization to gain returns on value, but can we respond with a new affirmation of value, independent from capitalist accumulation and the displacement of our communities? Those are some of the questions we’ve been asking.

JB: The pro-development side seems to argue that gentrification is justified by the fact that the residents in the DTES of today are not in a position to pay the requisite costs to live in a neighbourhood whose real estate potential is exorbitant. What they fail to realize is that the neighbourhood functions as a community and refuge for people who have largely been displaced and dispossessed previously—in some cases several times, by the same system that is trying to again remove them. How can we conceive of a way to bridge this gap between seeing a neighbourhood as dollar signs and seeing a neighbourhood as inhabited by a vulnerable population with a strong existing community?

NC: The events of Reconciliation are coming to a close here in Vancouver. Yesterday Vancouver City Council also apologized to the Japanese community for its motion in 1942 supporting the expulsion and internment of Japanese Canadians during the war. Now is a good time to ask, reflectively, if we want to continue repeating the mistakes of the past. Grace Eiko Thomson told city council that apologies and reconciliation mean nothing in the context of accelerating displacement and dispossession.

“For me, an apology is not enough unless it is followed up. Not for us, it’s too late for us. Most of us are gone. Most of us who experienced the internment are gone. It is so important we remember that what happened to us can happen to others. That is why I raise the Downtown Eastside because that is where we used to live. That is where we were displaced from. And the original people were the Coast Salish first nations who were originally displaced.

She continued: “For me, I really feel we have to be vigilant about other people who are still living in this area at the moment who are still socially and economically being excluded, particularly with this big talk about gentrification. The developers are moving in, the price of land is going up. So what does this mean for the people that are living there? Does that mean they are going to be displaced again? I hope not. This is the most important thing to me right now, that this doesn’t happen to another group of people. This is a unique community with a unique history and there are still people living here who may be displaced depending on how the city decided to act on this area…”

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Nathan Crompton Interview (Part 2 of 2)


Nathan Crompton hosted by Raymond Boisjoly
Burrard Marina Field House
Saturday September 28, 4 pm

This year marks 100 years since the dispossession of the Kitsilano Reserve, a year the city of Vancouver has also declared  the Year of Reconciliation.

Local writers Nathan Crompton and Maria Wallstam wrote an article in The Mainlander called City of perpetual displacement: 100 years since the destruction of the Kitsilano Reserve in July of this year. It explores the relationship between the rampant gentrification of the DTES & Grandview-Woodlands, and the colonial settlers’ unjust treatment of indigenous populations in the early 20th century. The article piqued the interest of our current Burrard Marina Field House artist in residence, Raymond Boisjoly, who identified that the Kitsilano Reserve discussed in the article is located in the exact same spot as the Burrard Marina Field House (1655 Whyte Avenue) where he’s been working for nearly six months. Throughout his residency at the Field House Boisjoly has been interested in the history of the land the Marina sits on. Crompton’s research and response to the dispossession of the Kits reserve aligns it with the current rash of forced evictions of low income residents in the DTES. A link can be drawn between Boisjoly and Crompton through their evocation of histories as a way to engage urgent current dialogues in the community.

For more detailed maps and history of the Kitsilano Indian Reserve lands go to UBC’s Indigenous foundations online mapping tool http://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/home/land-rights/mapping-tool-kitsilano-reserve.html.

– More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Nathan Crompton talk at the Burrard Marina Field House


I think we should all be restless in where we are — not towards accumulation, but towards an urgency in wanting to better understand the world around us.”
— Justin Langlois

Justin Langlois has recently moved to Vancouver from Windsor, Ontario. He’ll be joining the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design this Fall, and the CAG invited him to speak about his practice at the Burrard Marina Fieldhouse on Saturday, August 17th. He is co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an “artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore and unfold curiosities around locality, infrastructures, and creative practice leading towards civic change,” and he had lots to share about his background, but more so, his present and future.

He has developed his own brand of social rehabilitation in post-Fordist Windsor—a place which he believes is useful to think about in terms of potential opportunities, rather than as plagued by crisis. For Langlois, his entry into art was not one rooted in a studio practice, but instead in artistic efforts that mobilize several artists and ideas—like organizing rock shows, or producing a 200-copy newspaper. It seems inevitable that his small-town upbringing can be cited as an enabler for his enlightened sense of engagement and facilitation.

He touched on some key areas of the organization’s operational pedagogy and flipped through a small pamphlet (click here to view the pamphlet), sharing each page one-by-one. Each page expressed a carefully crafted opinion or idea that followed suit with its title, Limits and Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life—a title originating from Langlois’ belief that it is easier to begin acting and creating within a defined area, instead of trying to wrangle with infinity. He talked about the necessity to re-think the words and terms that we have come to establish meanings for which are insufficient; things like social change, engagement, public participation, and education. He encouraged the audience to consider each point to act as an entry from which a larger conversation could develop, and people responded at the end with thoughtful and sincere rebuttals. It’s only a matter of time ‘til we see what kinds of projects Langlois brings to life in Vancouver.

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Artists in Public | Justin Langlois Talk


This is Part III of an interview with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly and CAG Field House intern Jaclyn Bruneau. Preceding Part III was a Part I and II. Check ’em out.

Afternoons with Raymond – PART III

JB: Can you talk a little bit about how your own heritage relates to your work? I know you’ve talked about challenging these more classical, traditional ways of representing indigenous cultures.

RB: Well it does come to inform my work, but not in any simple way. I have made works that sort of trade on traditional imagery. I’m always sort of concerned with making sure that the work doesn’t come to be mistaken for the thing it represents. I’m interested in my capacity as an indigenous artist to be able to make work about indigenous issues that doesn’t simply reduce that to me making work about indigenous issues because I am myself indigenous.
I would like to think that I am also making work about these things because they’re important to everyone. They concern certain circumstances that we’re all in the midst of that come to impact us in uneven ways. So it becomes something that I definitely want to make accessible in a way that is about it coming to have this capacity to communicate something of that experience but in a strange, unfamiliar, unforeseen way.

So my heritage comes to influence that and it’s kind of about seeing a certain possibility in that, in terms of making contemporary art that doesn’t have to come close to aboriginal cultural practices as it is known, but could potentially work towards creating some sort of intuitive change to things or a subtle way of actually just letting material come to do something in and of itself. It’s a complex process in that—in a lot of works, my heritage isn’t necessarily readable in it and I’m interested in that discrepancy, where it becomes sort of, like, a furtive presence. It ultimately requires a certain activity to understand that relationship.

JB: What other cultures have affected you and influenced your work?

RB: A lot of things I’ve been interested in have been about the analyses of subcultures. I look to music a lot. I look at a lot of things that primarily address ideas of cultural transformation as represented through popular music, like the strange idea that both funk and heavy metal are derived from rhythm and blues in a way that each musical form was subtly transformed in a certain transitional process to communicate to a particular audience at a given time and place, but somehow leads to these very divergent forms.

So I’m really interested in that thing where it scarcely becomes that thing that it’s going to be. At least, looking at funk and heavy metal—not specifically cultures, but subcultural forms—becomes an interesting analogy between, at least for me—in terms of trying to understand that process—simply conceiving of an artistic practice isn’t about knowing what it is but realizing that my work can come to transform my understanding of things I have done previously.

JB: What does digital culture have to do with all of this? I’m thinking about the LightJet prints that were on display in March and April which you created by dragging your iPhone around a flatbed scanner as it played musical performances from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Is there a particular comment you’re making by converging these multiple electronic processes of new and old?

RB: So they’re prints made by laser exposing the piece of paper. It’s processed like any photograph, so I guess that melding becomes a strange thing of finding some other sort of way to show the manner in which photography can index time. In a lot of cases, strangely, many of the scans that I made scanned right to left rather than left to right, so it creates these weird tensions that might not be visible. But I like that strange thing in which these different technologies come to function—that they can be used in these ways that they weren’t necessarily intended to be used for; to create some image of these different types of image-making. The ipod on the scanner leaves this layer in between the two of them—the dust and scratches on the glass, so it’s this strange thing of there being a depicted sort of material and an actual material, somehow.

I’m hearing all these stories about children’s intuitive use of touch screen technology that comes to affect the way that they expect printed magazines to function. It leads me to think of that strange thing where our encounter with visual material just creates this different relationship we have to it that is about interacting with it; seeing a certain capacity with it to touch it to make it work.

I think that process of using the ipods and the scanners means to—well, that easily manipulable aspect of it to hold an ipod in my hand—it’s sort of about stressing that physical manifestation of it. That it persists as an object that can be used in these weird ways. So it’s just a present capacity of an ipod and a scanner to produce an image in a very ad hoc way.

JB: Tell us about some of the books on your shelves.

RB: [Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language], I’m looking at it because I’m teaching a course that is ostensibly about text-based art. The book is this really amazing thing—there are chapters in it that deal with the use of geological metaphors and biological metaphors in our understanding of language… so the idea that a language could be said to die as being a biological metaphor. Looking at shifts, thinking of the way in which language shifts where two languages can come to encounter one another and have subtle effects on one another is often discussed in terms of geology. So it’s a really amazing in the sense that it finds all this incredibly rich imagery in the way people sort of discuss language; and what people expect of it.

JB: How does it read?

RB: It’s quite academic, but really kind of a fascinating thing in the sense that it’s episodic. I know a lot of these started as individual articles—like, H & Co. was first published in Cabinet. So it reads very easily in the sense that it’s not very demanding and fairly short and accessible. So it’s a really incredible book that I’ve been returning to for quite a while and that I’m excited to finally be able to share with students.

JB: Where are you at with the course?

RB: I’m teaching it at Emily Carr and there’s a lot of planning to do for it this month [August].

JB: What else have you got in that pile?

RB: [chuckles] What else?

JB: Show me one more.

RB: Well, there’s this incredible Jimmie Durham catalog—A Matter of Life and Death and Singing. [Begins flipping through the book and does not stop until his response concludes]. This is part of a career-long retrospective. It’s this incredible document that is exciting in the sense that it seems tied to a lot of these other things, like a collection of his poetry and critical writings that are also coming out, but he’s just someone that I really admire and it’s nice to see this kind of extended document concerning his career.

JB: Thank you so much for your time.

RB: No problem.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part III


Hello one and all,

I’m Jaclyn Bruneau, the CAG Field House intern currently working with Raymond Boisjoly during his summer artist-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. I’ll be keeping people in the loop about his activities, and with Field House events by reporting in this blog. Look for posts with the ‘Field House Studio’ blog category and keep your dials tuned in.

A few Saturdays ago, Raymond and I spent the afternoon at False Creek Community Centre where he led a workshop as part of the Vancouver Draw Down, that very cool single-day drawing festival that invites Vancouverites to access various types of drawing workshops for free, held in over 23 locations city wide. The workshop was titled Re-Inventing Drawing and began invitingly with tables scattered with pipe cleaners, masking tape, paper cups, tree branches, string, scissors, pieces of paper big and small, and a ton of markers all of which were used together or separately to create fantastically experimental gestural marks on paper.

Our first two visitors were a pair of twins named Alex and Liam, who seemed to have made use of all the materials. They taped felts all around the parameter of the paper cup; strung together branches, attaching a pen on each end and then twirling the contraption above paper; and stuck felts through holes in foamy paper. Their mom seemed blown away at all the things they came up with. Some others made contraptions with the branches that allowed two people to each take hold of a part of the branch, and proceed to see if they could collaboratively render an image they thought up together beforehand. Raymond even drew my attention to a mystery visitor who got carried away with their new tools on the hardwood floor (oops!). Above are some photos from the workshop.

During the afternoon’s workshop the space was flooded with natural light and we left the doors wide open, so people walking the path outside could peek in and join. We met daughters and dads, kids in strollers, couples, best friends, and even a few grandparents. It was amazing how little instruction everyone needed. They seemed full of ideas, and were very eager–especially those itching to fill their Draw Down passports with stamps. I floated around taking photos and getting people started. Raymond seemed to know exactly what to say in the way of inspiration for those stuck for an idea.

– Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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News from the Field House & fun with Draw Down!


Last Friday night the CAG hosted a public conversation between art historian and critic Jan Verwoert and local artist Elizabeth McIntosh. McIntosh is currently exhibiting a solo show entitled Violet’s Hair at the gallery. The event drew in a huge crowd, filling the gallery to full capacity, and engaged the audience in a dialogue about contemporary practices of painting.

A big thank you to both Jan and Elizabeth for their participation!

Here are some of the pictures from the evening.

 

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Jan Verwoert and Elizabeth McIntosh Public Conversation


Kyla Mallet gave a slide presentation entitled ‘How to See and Read the Aura: Finding the Invisible’ this past Wednesday at EVERY LETTER IN THE ALPHABET. There was a good turnout and the question period led to some great discussions.

Here are some photos from the evening.

 

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Slide Presentation By Kyla Mallett


$12.00

Published:
134 pages

This catalogue is published on the occasion of the exhibition of Kevin Schmidt within the International Studio Programme at Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin.

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How to Make a Large Format Photograph of the Horizon from the Edge of Space


$375.00

Published:
pages

youngpatronscrop.111807

Night School IV

March 16 - May 15, 2016
10 sessions

$375
(payment can also be made monthly)

Includes a complimentary CAG membership
Space is limited with only 20 seats available for this semester.

Night School is a program for new collectors and contemporary art enthusiasts, an introductory contemporary art survey that is intentionally accessible, intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Lectures by instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world. A suggested reading list will complement the discussion program. Along with the lectures, the participants will also engage in three studio visits with internationally recognized local artists including: Vikky Alexander, Gareth Moore, Elizabeth McIntosh, and tours of exhibitions by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun - Unceded Territories at the Museum of Anthropology and upcoming exhibition, MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Wednesday March 16

Lecture 1 - The French Salon

Sunday March 20 

Studio Visit 1 with Vikky Alexander

Wednesday March 23

Lecture 2 - Matter Is Meaning

March 23 - April 2

Easter Reading Week Break (no session)

Sunday April 3

Exhibition Visit - MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture @ VAG

Sunday April 10

Studio Visit 2 with Elizabeth McIntosh

Wednesday April 13

Lecture 3 - Absorbing Abstractions

Sunday April 24

Studio Visit 3 with Gareth Moore

Wednesday April 27

Lecture 4 - Surrealism and Other Truths

Friday May 6

Exhibition preview for Jochen Lempert

Sunday May 15

Exhibition Tour - Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun @ MOA

 

Cost: $375, includes a complimentary CAG membership.

Space is limited - 20 seats

To register contact Kristin Cheung, Development Officer

at k.cheung@contemporaryartgallery.ca or call 604 681 2700.

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Night School IV


$35.00

Published:
64 pages

"In hotam #1 (A Brief History of Me), I want to give the reader an introduction of my life up to now. My old photographs and the historic events together form a timeline. Although no year or date is specified, the reader can tell the time if they understand that each page represents one year of my life. Having turned 50 years old, I try to look back at my somewhat privileged life while reflect on my position in the world."

Edition of 250.

Artists' Book Week: Ho Tam
Tuesday, October 13, 7pm
hotampress.com

In conjunction with the 2015 Vancouver Art/Book Fair’s Artists’ Book Week, the CAG presents local artist Ho Tam discussing recent publications including his hotam and Poser projects.

This event is presented by the Contemporary Art Gallery as part of the Vancouver Art/Book Fair's open-source event series Artists' Book Week.

www.2015.vancouverartbookfair.com

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hotam #1: A Brief History of Me


$15.00

Published:
62 pages

The Yellow Pages (1993) was Ho Tam's first artist’s book. It explored the stereotypes and cliches on Chinese and Asian cultures in the North American context. The book was also adapted into a 8 minute video piece premiered at the Union Station in Toronto. In 1998, Gallery 101 (Ottawa) helped the artist to make this second run of The Yellow Pages with offset printing. All the pages are reproduced from the original work. In addition, there is an afterword written by Ho Tam. Offset printed and perfect bound. Second edition of 500.

Artists' Book Week: Ho Tam
Tuesday, October 13, 7pm
hotampress.com

In conjunction with the 2015 Vancouver Art/Book Fair’s Artists’ Book Week, the CAG presents local artist Ho Tam discussing recent publications including his hotam and Poser projects.

This event is presented by the Contemporary Art Gallery as part of the Vancouver Art/Book Fair's open-source event series Artists' Book Week.

www.2015.vancouverartbookfair.com

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The Yellow Pages


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