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Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Brendan Fernandes


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Marie Lorenz


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Broken City Lab


Upcoming at the Field House

Upcoming at the Field House

Broken City Lab
Residency

January to April, 2014

Broken City Lab is an artist-led collective that works through collaborative social practice and creative research to understand the ways in which locality is shaped and enacted in the city. Taking the form of events, workshops, installations, and interventions, their projects aim to connect various disciplines and critique, annotate and re-imagine the cities that they encounter, and have unfolded in collaboration with numerous organizations and institutions. They currently operate CIVIC Space in downtown Windsor, Ontario, a  24-month long project exploring the intersection of art and civic life. As part of the Field House Studio Residency members will embark on site-specific research towards a new project that explores and makes visible issues at the intersection of education, public space and civic life. This new project will develop a sequence of programming that circulates in and around the Burrard Marina Field House.

Broken City Lab’s work recently appeared in the ­th International Venice Biennial of Architecture as part of the Grounds for Detroit exhibit and the collective was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Previous projects have included working with the City of Windsor’s Transit Authority to install community-created text-based art in its buses; interactive outdoor projections detailing hundreds of ideas for saving the city; the design and distribution of removable micro-gardens; interactive text-based performance so‹ware; large-scale messages projected across an international border; artists hosted for an interdisciplinary storefront residency project; a ­ƒ foot long message painted on a parking lot visible from planes and satellites; and leading numerous psycho-geographic walks, DIY workshops and community brainstorming sessions in cities all
across Canada.

For this residency, we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative
Communities Award and the generosity of many private and individual donations.  The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Broken City Lab acknowledges support from Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Windsor and Ontario Trillium Foundation.

ARTIST TALK:

Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15 ƒ,  2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will
host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field
House Studio.

Marie Lorenz – visit and upcoming 2014 project

This December 2013, Marie Lorenz will visit Vancouver to begin research for a project to be completed in May 2014 at the Burrard Marina Field House.

Marie Lorenz’s work combines psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms. In her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi, (http://www.tideandcurrenttaxi.org/) Lorenz ferries people on the East and Hudson Rivers surrounding New York City in a boat she has specially made. Lorenz studies tidal charts of the New York Harbor and uses river currents to direct and drift the boat throughout the waterways of the City. The act of floating adds a specific presence to one’s own observation: the viewer maintains an awareness of their own balance and form as they absorb the details in their surroundings. This kind of observation creates something new out of something familiar. For Vancouver Lorenz will begin to develop ideas and discussion toward constructing a new vessel and mapping local waterways in which the community will play an important role as participants.

Previously at the Field House

Canadian artist Raymond Boisjoly was our inaugural resident artist at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. For six months Boisjoly occupied the Field House, using it as a studio and a place for community engagement.

Please see the related blog posts on the right for more news about his residency at the Field House. Click here for the CAG Field House Blog

The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery. This initiative seeks to support artists whose practice moves beyond conventional exhibition making, echoing the founding origins of the gallery where artists were offered support toward the production of new work. Our goal in presenting art outside of the boundaries of our exhibition spaces is to reach out to communities, offering new ways for individuals to encounter and connect with art and artists, expanding audiences as well as strengthening our commitment to nurturing artists through example, context and commissioning.

Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.

Speaker Series: Artists in Public
This summer the CAG launched a new series inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.

Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
Langlois discussed his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Unlearning Weekenders 
Saturday, June 22, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina

This first talk presented collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who were working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, a project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, created in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects. They discussed the series of workshops which invited the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.

Family Days at the Field House Studio

Free drop-in art activities for all ages which responded to the work of Raymond Boisjoly and CAG exhibitions.

Saturday August 24 – A free all ages drop-in art activity: making pin-wheel windmills.
Saturday July 27
- We welcomed art makers of all ages to the Field House, participants learnt the basics of printmaking by making their own styrofoam relief prints.
Saturday June 29 - All ages of visitors dropped by the Field House for a marine mobile workshop, constructing easy-to-make kinetic sculptures which took the marine world as a theme.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly was supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

MORE

Burrard Marina Field House Studio - Raymond Boisjoly


The Contemporary Art Gallery presented the premiere of The Pixelated Revolution a new performance by Lebanese actor, director, and playwright Rabih Mroué. Mroué’s storytelling pits facts against propaganda imbued with a particular sense of humour and a visual sensibility. By means of a semi-documentary style of theatre, his often-controversial work draws attention to issues and events overlooked in the current political climate of the Middle East. Taking the form of a lecture-performance about the usage of mobile phones during the Syrian revolution, The Pixelated Revolution examines the contemporary and recent phenomenon of photographs made during such events of conflict, broadcast and shared via Facebook and other virtual communication tools, as a means to direct and communicate events to the world.

Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and grunt gallery.

MORE

Rabih Mroué - The Pixelated Revolution


Looking for a Missing Employee is a thoughtful and provocative performance puzzle in which Mroué follows the true story of a man who disappears from his low-level post at the Ministry of Finance in Beirut, never to be seen again. Merging storytelling with live sketching, the artist takes us on a perplexing search for the ‘truth’, littered with a sea of documents, clippings, photos and found objects. The material accumulates under multi-camera live feeds as we are exposed to the ways media shapes public perception, rumours, accusations, political conflicts and scandals. What unfolds is a commentary on the phenomenon of disappearance and proof that “between the truth and a lie, there is but a hair.”

Supported by The Roundhouse. Presented in partnership with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival and grunt gallery. This tour is made possible through the collaboration of P.S. 122 (New York), On the Boards (Seattle), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis) and The Andy Warhol Museum (Pittsburgh).

Rabih Mroué, Looking for a Missing Employee
The Roundhouse, January 26–28, 8pm
Post-show discussion led by Vanessa Kwan, January 27

MORE

Rabih Mroué - Looking for a Missing Employee


SFU Philosophers Café: Art Salons

In the spirit of social gatherings that provide forums for discussion, SFU Philosophers’ Café will run two art salons in collaboration with the Contemporary Art Gallery. Each café will start with a guided tour of current exhibitions with Director Nigel Prince, followed by a discussion with Shaun Dacey, Curator, Learning and Public Programs and special guests.

Salon on the exhibition ‘When Sky was Sea’ by Japanese artist Shimabuku
Saturday, December 6, 3pm
free

 

MORE

SFU Philosophers Café: Art Salons - on Shimabuku


Shimabuku
Friday, November 21, 6.30pm

MORE

Artist Talk | Shimabuku


Jürgen Partenheimer
Saturday, September 13, 4pm
Join the artist on a walk through tour of his exhibition.

Jürgen Partenheimer
The Archive – The Raven Diaries
September 12 to November 9, 2014

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first solo exhibition in Canada of work by acclaimed German artist Jürgen Partenheimer. Reflecting the diversity of the artist’s practice, the exhibition comprises works on paper, text, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture, much of it produced in Vancouver in spring 2014 during his recent residency as the Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence, hosted by Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Partenheimer’s work is essentially abstract; his drawings and paintings, caught seemingly on the verge of dissolution, are remarkable for their fragile beauty, whilst sculpture and ceramic work, suggesting some usefulness, remain elusive with respect to any specific function. His artistic proposition is philosophical, encouraging us to challenge the distinction normally made between reality and imagination. Drawing is used as a means to suggest new pictorial space, linking our experience of place through mapping and gesture, through mark-making. His visual language, the particular form of poetic abstraction, creates a system of open, meditative boundaries. As such this conceptual approach, his life-long interest in notions of representation and his thoughtful, meticulous consideration of locality, space and place, suggest a key resonance with artistic practice in the city, asserting continuity between these forms and an experience of daily life.

- See more at: http://www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/exhibitions/jurgen-partenheimer-the-archive-the-raven-diaries/#sthash.q3xbRuZC.dpuf

MORE

Jürgen Partenheimer - Artist talk and walk through


Sameer Farooq
Burrard Marina Field House Studio, 1655 Whyte Avenue
Tuesday, September 9, 7pm
The CAG presents an evening screening of documentaries shot
in China over the past decade by Field House artist-in-residence
Sameer Farooq: I Want to Grow Old (2008) and The Silk Road of
Pop (2013).

MORE

Film Screening - Sameer Farooq: I Want to Grow Old & The Silk Road of Pop


Broken City Lab
Flagged For Review
Burrard Marina Field House Studio
1655 Whyte Avenue
Every Tuesday evening:

March 18 to April 29, 7- 8.30pm

NEXT: Tuesday, April 8, 7-8.30pm

The Trouble is…

Bring your questions, suspicions, and inspirations for art in public spaces to an open conversation on art as troublemaking and troublemaking as art.

Broken City Lab (BCL) are currently artists-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House. Their four month project, Flagged for Review examines the surrounding site and its relation to current perceptions of the city through a series of initiated conversations. Every Tuesday until the end of April, the collective will host public games, temporary installations and conversations concerning social and political issues present in Vancouver. These will culminate in the production of a series of flags to be installed at the Field House and throughout the city during the last two months of their residency.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver.

For this residency we gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia through the BC Creative Communities Award.

MORE

Broken City Lab - Flagged For Review


Brendan Fernandes
Tuesday, June 10, 7pm
Please join us for a talk introducing Fernandes’ residency, he will discuss his recent projects.

MORE

Artist Talk - Brendan Fernandes


Broken City Lab
Saturday, February 15,  2pm Artist talk – 3-5 pm discussion
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655€ƒƒ Whyte Avenue

In partnership with SFU Philosophers Café, Broken City Lab will host an artist talk and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio.

 

MORE

Artist Talk - Broken City Lab


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm
Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri, one of the artists included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

MORE

Artist Talk - Maryam Jafri


Social Practice Pot Luck
Saturday April 26 7-9pm

To mark the end of Broken City Lab’s Field House residency we are hosting a pot luck and intimate conversation regarding social practice with special guest artist and Founder/Director of the Art and Social Practice MFA program at Portland State University, Harrell Fletcher. Fletcher is visiting Vancouver as a part of the ‘Working as an Artist’ workshop series at Purple Thistle and will be giving an artist talk at the Thistle (Friday April 25, 7:30pm) and leading a workshop (Saturday April 26, 1-4pm) with local artist Carmen Papalia. http://purplethistle.ca/

Bring a snack and join in on the conversation. Broken City Lab with Harrell Fletcher will lead an open conversation regarding the current state of social practice.

MORE

Social Practice Pot Luck with Harrell Fletcher


Jürgen Partenheimer
Thursday, May 8, 6pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

In partnership with ECUAD and in conjunction with his residency, Partenheimer will discuss recent projects as part of his forthcoming solo exhibition at the CAG in September 2014.

MORE

Artist Talk | Renga: Dimensions of Abstraction - Jürgen Partenheimer


Please join us to celebrate the launch of our new book shop at the CAG with a special talk and book signing with Jürgen Partenheimer

Saturday April 5, 1.30–2.30pm.

Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
February to May, 2014

In partnership with ECUAD, German artist Jürgen Partenheimer will be living and working in Vancouver for three months, work produced during this residency forming part of his forthcoming solo exhibition at the CAG in September 2014. There will be a series of associated events as part of the residency. Please visit our website for further details.

An accompanying book DAS ARCHIV/THE ARCHIVE published by Distanz Verlag, Germany in partnership with CAG, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; Gemeente Museum Den Haag and Deichtorhellen Hamburg Sammlung Falckenberg is available from the CAG Bookshop and online at the special price $50.

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Publication launch and signing - Jürgen Partenhiemer


Richter 858 - Bill Frisell in conversation with Nigel Prince
Held at The Vancouver Playhouse

Bill Frisell turns brushstrokes into sounds with Richter 858, a live, multi-media event that presents compositions inspired by eight abstract works by celebrated German painter Gerhard Richter, one of the most important visual artists working today.

Before the Vancouver premiere of the piece, also featuring music from Sign of Life: Music for the 858 Quartet, Frisell was joined by CAG Director Nigel Prince for a conversation about art as inspiration and music as the medium.

Presented in collaboration with Vancouver New Music.

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Artist Talk | Bill Frisell


Richard Fung will present Dal Puri Diaspora (2012), an 80 minute film tracing the development of the dal puri roti, a dish originated in eastern India that traveled with South Asian and Caribbean Diasporas to Canada. There will be a post-screening conversation between Fung, Dr. Sneja Gunew (Professor of English and Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice, UBC) and Michelle Jacques (Chief Curator, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria).

Funded by the UBC President’s Endowment Fund in partnership with the Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre and the CAG.

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Talk | Dal Puri Diaspora


In-conversation: James Welling and Dominic McIver Lopes
Wednesday, November 13, 7pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

Dominic McIver Lopes, Professor in the Department of Philosophy at UBC, and President of the American Society for Aesthetics, joins artist James Welling for a public conversation considering Welling’s practice.

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In-conversation: James Welling and Dominic McIver Lopes


Marie Lorenz
Saturday, December 7, 2pm
The Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenue

Lorenz will present an introduction to her practice outlining the ideas, themes and methodologies which will provide the basis for her project to be developed in Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Marie Lorenz


Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly hosts a talk and discussion with Nathan Crompton.

Nathan Crompton co-editor of The Mainlander, will speak about the history of the land where Vanier Park and the Burrard Marina Field House are located, previously the Kitsilano Reserve. 2013 marks the 100 year anniversary of the dispossession and displacement of the reserve.

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Field House Talk | Nathan Crompton hosted by Raymond Boisjoly


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery and supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.This summer the CAG launches a new talks program inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.Artists in Public Speaker Series:Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm
Field House Studio at Burrard MarinaLanglois will discuss his work as co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore locality, infrastructures and creative practice leading towards civic change. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Windsor. In the fall of 2013, he will join the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design.http://www.brokencitylab.org/projects/
Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenuehttp://eblast.matchboxcreative.com/t/ViewEmail/y/098F9E3307BEFE89/2D08E80B14EDBD63F6A1C87C670A6B9F

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Field House Studio - Artists in Public: Speaker Series | Justin A. Langlois


The Field House Studio is an off-site artist residency space and community hub organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery and supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. Running parallel to the residency program is an ongoing series of public events for all ages.This summer the CAG launches a new talks program inviting creative and cultural producers to share their theories, thoughts, and experiences of developing projects in the public realm.The first talk presents collaborators Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau who are currently working on a public project throughout Vancouver entitled Unlearning Weekender, (A project by Goethe Satellite @ Vancouver, in cooperation with Dance Troupe Practice, Windsor House School, Public Dreams and Revised Projects). They will discuss this series of workshops which invite the public to create rituals as a means of challenging invisible social structures aiming to strengthen community bonds.Artists in Public:
Zoe Kreye and Catherine Grau
Saturday, June 22, 4pm

http://unlearning-weekenders.tumblr.com/

Next up:
Justin A. Langlois
Saturday, August 17, 4pm

Field House Studio at Burrard Marina
1655 Whyte Avenue

http://eblast.matchboxcreative.com/t/ViewEmail/y/098F9E3307BEFE89/2D08E80B14EDBD63F6A1C87C670A6B9F

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Field House Studio - Artist in Public Speaker Series | Zoe Kreye & Catherine Grau


Jürgen Partenheimer
Thursday, May 8, 6pm
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Room 301, 1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island

This special event involves multiple voices approaching notions of abstraction from a variety of poetic, philosophical and theoretical standpoints by Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence Jürgen Partenheimer. Born in Munich in 1947, Partenheimer studied the theory and practice of art in Germany, the USA, Mexico and France. As a representative of a subjective abstraction, he is considered one of the most important contemporary artists of Germany. With theory, poetry and prose as his referential grammar for artistic expression, Partenheimer’s work encompasses painting, drawing, sculpture and text. Marked by a post-minimalist background and a poetic intensity, his art has been referred to as metaphysical realism. He became internationally renowned following his participation in the Paris, Venice and São Paulo Biennials, and in 2000 became the first contemporary German artist to have a retrospective in China at the National Museum of Art in Beijing. His work has been part of major exhibitions including The Museum of Modern Art in New York and San Francisco, the Miró Foundation in Barcelona and the Museum Ludwig in Cologne.

Featuring guest appearances by Nigel Prince, Nicholas Lea, Mayko Nguyen and Aoife MacNamara.

Partenheimer’s work has received many national and international prizes and awards, among others the Art Critics’ Prize of Madrid, Spain; the NEA Grant, National Endowment of the Arts, New York; Canada Council Grant, Montréal and the Federal Cross of Merit of Germany for outstanding international achievement. Partenheimer has taught as Professor, Distinguished Visiting Professor and Visiting artist among others at San Francisco Art Institute; Academy of Fine Arts, Düsseldorf, University of California at Davis; Rijks Academy in Amsterdam; Royal College of Art, Edinburgh; Rhode Island School of Design and WITS School of Arts in Johannesburg.

Partenheimer’s residency at Emily Carr takes place from February – May, 2014 in preparation for an exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery in the fall of 2014. The exhibition in Vancouver forms part of an open cooperation with the Pinakothek der Moderne München (The Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Munich); Falckenberg Collection, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg and the Gemeentemuseum The Hague, exploring site and space-related installation concepts. Parallel to the different exhibitions, all of which will be held in 2014, the participating institutions closely worked on a publication with the artist that aims at commenting on and integrating the various aspects of his work as an additional ‘fifth room’. International authors from a variety of different disciplines, including Anne Carson, Lebogang Mashile, Carla Schulz-Hoffmann, Antje v. Graevenitz, John Burnside, Oswald Egger and Rudi Fuchs, have taken up the invitation to write contributions and become involved in this project. Published by Distanz Publishers, Berlin, 2014.

Established in 2012, the Audain Distinguished Artist in Residence Program has a mandate to bring nationally and internationally renowned contemporary artists to Vancouver, create curriculum specific to each individual visiting artist, and support the creation of new works. Adopting a flexible model that encourages experimentation, collaboration, dialogue and engagement, the program will benefit artists, the academic community, the Vancouver art community at large, and will greatly contribute to Vancouver’s stature within the international art world. The Program, housed within the Audain School of Visual Arts encompassing the Faculty of Visual Arts + Material Practice, provides support for two artists per year to live and work in Vancouver for a one to three month period, and includes living and travel expenses, support for production costs, exhibitions and honoraria.

Please note that Aoife MacNamara’s reading has been removed due to technical difficulties. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenient.

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Video | Jürgen Partenheimer - Renga: Dimensions of Abstraction


CJSF interns Ana Costa + Anh Dang interview New York visual and video artist Maryam Jafri about her work AVALON (2011), which is Contemporary Art Gallery’s June 2014 exhibition The Act Of Seeing With One’s Own Eyes.

Jafri weaves themes of production, representation and role playing throughout her work.

Aired originally on CJSF’s Spoken Word Surprise July 1st (Tuesday 4pm)

Includes notes from CAG curator and excerpts from the June 26th artist talk.

www.maryamjafri.net/

Talk info + audio: www.contemporaryartgallery.ca/learning/a…yam-jafri/

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CJSF Radio interview with Maryam Jafri


Maryam Jafri
Thursday, June 26, 7pm

Please join us for a talk by artist Maryam Jafri. Her video work Avalon (2011) is included in The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes.

In her moving image works, Jafri blurs the distinction between scripted films and unscripted documentaries. In Avalon (2011), Jafri seamlessly weaves together stories from real life workers in an unnamed leather company in an unspecified Asian country, with a script that she wrote herself. The workers in this factory are not told that they are making fetish products to be sold to the masses in the United States, and this selective disclosure can be seen in the disconnect between the production process and the final product itself. Parallels can be made between the secretive nature within the leather factory, the viewer’s unsurety of who is an actor and who is not, as well as to the overall editing process which yields a carefully restrained video work about the complex topics of overseas factories and the world of fetish paraphernalia.

Jafri’s solo exhibitions include: Mouthfeel, Gasworks, London (2014); Backdrop, Bielefelder kustverein, Bielefeld, Germany (2013); Stages, WYSPA Institute of Art, Gdansk (2012); Geographies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde (2012); Headlines and Small Print (with Anderas Fogarasi), Galerie Nova/WHW Zagreb (2012); Global Slum, Beirut, Cairo (2012) and Shanghai Biennial and Taipei Biennial (2012). She has also exhibited in group exhibitions including: Fassbinder Jetzt – Fassbinder and Contemporary Art, Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt (2013); Past is Present (Murals), Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Ten Thousand Wiles, Hundred Thousand Tricks, MuKHA, Antwerp (2013); When Attitudes Became Forms Become Attitudes, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2013); Manifesta 9, Genk (2012). Maryam Jafri lives and works in New York and Copenhagen. She holds a BA in Literature from Brown University, an MA from NYU/Tisch School of The Arts and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

www.maryamjafri.net/avalon.htm

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Artist Talk | Maryam Jafri


Night School is a series of informal lectures and studio visits that are intentionally accessible, yet intelligent and engaging. Through a curriculum built from the history of exhibitions at the CAG, participants will learn about common themes in recent contemporary visual arts and ways in which they are interpreted and discussed. Guest instructor Lee Plested will introduce work by important artists from Vancouver and around the world during four lectures and a suggested reading list complementing the discussion program.

Night School participants will also be involved in studio visits with three, internationally recognized, Vancouver-based artists. Steven Shearer, Geoffrey Farmer and Liz Magor have all held important exhibitions at the CAG and their projects will be introduced during the previous lecture. These field trips will be paired with cocktail events.

Night School offers direct access to and dialogue with artists and curators in the city. Alongside its curriculum, a passport of local events, openings and lectures will provide an expanded perspective on the Vancouver art scene plus opportunities to build a greater appreciation of art production and presentation in the city.

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Night School


As part of our Feedback series acclaimed Toronto-based artist Luis Jacob responded to Aurélien Froment’s exhibition ‘Fröbel Fröbeled’, he also discussed his own practice and his interest in pedagogical ideas contained in the exhibition.

Luis Jacob is an artist based in Toronto, whose diverse practice addresses social interaction and the subjectivity of aesthetic experience.  Realized as painting, video, installation, photography and actions in the public sphere, Jacob’s work invites a collision of meaning systems that destabilize our conventions of viewing and that open up possibilities for engagement and the creation of knowledge.

As an artist, he has achieved an international reputation – particularly since his participation in documenta12, curated by Ruth Noack and Roger Bürgel in 2007.  Several significant solo exhibitions include Kunstverein Hamburg (curated by Meike Behm and Yilmaz Dziewior in 2008) ; Städtisches Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (curated by Suzanne Titz in 2009); Fonderie Darling, Montréal (curated by Marie Fraser in 2010); Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto (curated by David Liss in 2011); and Kunsthalle Lingen (curated by Meike Behm in 2012). Jacob’s work was also featured in group exhibitions at the Taipei Biennial (2012); Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2012); Witte de With Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2012); Generali Foundation, Vienna (2011); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2010); Contemporary Art Museum, Houston (2010); Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Philadelphia (2009); Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst (MuHKA), Antwerp (2008); Barbican Art Gallery, London (2008); and The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto (2008). His work is found in the permanent collection of the Generali Foundation (Vienna, Austria); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa, Canada); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, USA); Städtisches Museum Abteiberg (Mönchengladbach, Germany); Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Canada); Museion‚ Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (Bolzano, Italy); Agnes Etherington Art Centre (Kingston, Canada); Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto, Canada); and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, University of Toronto (Toronto, Canada).

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Luis Jacob


Congratulations to British Columbia born artist Erin Shirreff on WINNING! the AIMIA | AGO Photography prize.

Scroll below, to listen to her artist talk, delivered earlier this year during her exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Kelowna born Shirreff presented a talk on her exhibition Pictures and discussed her interest in differing encounters between representations of image and object. Erin Shirreff’s solo exhibition, Pictures,  at the Contemporary Art Gallery was the first presentation dedicated exclusively to the artist’s film and video work.

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Artist Talk | Erin Shirreff - Winner of the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize 2013


Y-CAG

New Y-CAG starts in November – still time to sign up!

Program Runs – Two Wednesdays each month from November, 2013 – May, 2014
Cost – $350

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Information Sheet

Y-CAG 2013/2014 Application Form

Y-CAG offers youth interested in contemporary art, visual culture and exhibition-making the opportunity to work closely with leading artists, curators, gallery staff and educators. Co-hosted by the Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Y-CAG will offer a behind-the-scenes look into both institutions, through gallery and facility visits.

Students will engage in discussions focusing on contemporary cultural issues; participate in the production of publications, events and presentations; and gain experience producing, installing and documenting artwork. Work produced in the program will culminate in a student-initiated ‘exhibition in print’.

  • Meet bi-weekly and build relationships with other creative teens, Contemporary Art Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design staff, and visiting museum professionals and artists;
  • Identify interests and questions and use these to explore art through a variety of means, from looking, researching, and discussing to art making;
  • Place contemporary art within the context of what is going on in the larger world; and
  • Work with a variety of people and teen peers to create a public art exhibition or event.

Cost

The cost of the program is $350 for the entire six months and includes refreshments at each session.

Schedule

Teens will meet twice a month from 4:00 – 7:00 PM two Wednesdays of every month for afterschool meetings facilitated by educators and art professionals. Meetings will alternate between the CAG and Emily Carr.

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Y-CAG Program with ECUAD


Brendan Fernandes
Tuesday, June 10, 7pm

Brendan Fernandes is a Canadian artist of Kenyan and Indian descent based between Toronto and New York City.
In this artist talk introducing Fernandes’ residency, he discussed his recent projects. This summer the CAG hosts a two month residency with Brendan Fernandes. At the core of the artist’s practice lies an investigation into the concept of authenticity, an ideological construct as a shaper of cultural experience.

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Artist Talk | Brendan Fernandes


Romanian artist Ciprian Muresan discusses his work. Presented in collaboration with Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Ciprian Muresan


Boisjoly is an Aboriginal artist of Haida and Québécois descent based in Vancouver, BC. His practice engages the representation of Aboriginality through vernacular materials, photography and especially text-based work combining contemporary craft, pop references and street art with various cultural signifiers of traditional Northwest Coast imagery. His talk considered the varied intersections of history, technology, and cultural practice as the central concern of his current work marking the beginning of his residency at the Burrard Marina Field House. Presented in collaboration with Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist talk | Raymond Boisjoly


Los Angeles based artist Matthew Monahan gives a formal lecture on his work exploring the major themes in his practice. This talk coincided with Monahan’s first solo exhibition in Canada and highlights Monahan’s interest in the interplay between two and three dimensions, between drawing and materiality, infused with personal mythology and a self reflective look at the conventions of museum display.

Presented in partnership with Graduate Studies at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Matthew Monahan


Artist Matthew Monahan is interviewed by Curator and Educator Heidi Reitmaier about his work and his exhibition ‘Matthew Monahan’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, April 27 to July 1, 2012. Video by Adrian Buitenhuis

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Video | Matthew Monahan


In this talk, artist Josephine Meckseper discussed her practice exploring the relationship between politics and consumerism. This event was presented in partnership with SFU Woodward’s Cultural Programs. The talk was held at Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Third floor, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Josephine Meckseper


This video interview with Irish artist Sarah Browne was created by Jessica Foley to coincide with the exhibition ‘How To Use Fool’s Gold’ at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, July 13 to September 2, 2012.

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Video | Sarah Browne


Artist Sarah Browne discusses her work with CAG Director Nigel Prince, at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Sarah Browne


Artist Nicolas Sassoon talks on his work and his exhibition WAVES at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Canada Line, Vancouver.

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Artist Talk | Nicolas Sassoon


Artist and writer Frances Stark discusses her feature length animation film ‘My Best Thing’, shown at the Contemporary Art Gallery from Feb 3 to April 15, 2012.

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Video | Frances Stark


American artist Sharon Hayes discusses her exhibition In The Near Future at the CAG, April 8 – June 5, 2011.

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Video | Sharon Hayes


An in conversation event moderated by Jenifer Papararo. Following brief presentations by the artists, discussions centred around the artists’ practices, works on display and focused on issues of process, use of performance and the reversal of subject/author roles.

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Artist Talk | Ruti Sela, Maayan Amir & Sharon Hayes


Danish Artist Jeppe Hein discusses his work and his CAG exhibition Please Please Please in an artist talk held at Emily Carr University of Art + Design on Friday January 30, 2009. The talk is introduced by Christina Ritchie then Executive Director of the CAG and curator of the exhibition Please Please Please.

links: www.jeppehein.net

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Artist Talk | Jeppe Hein


Coast Salish artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun talks about his practice at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Artist Talk | Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun


Federico Herrero discusses his CAG exhibition “Vibrantes”, September 9, 2011 to January 15, 2012.
Video production by Adrian Buitenhuis.

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Video | Federico Herrero


Eli Bornowsky Interviews Elizabeth McIntosh (Part 1 of 2)

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Video | Eli Bornowsky & Elizabeth McIntosh (Part 1)


Eli Bornowsky interviews Elizabeth McIntosh on the occasion of the exhibition – Eli Bornowsky: Walking, Square, Cylinder, Plane - November 26 – January 22, 2011
© Contemporary Art Gallery, The Western Front and The Artists, 2011.

 

 

 

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Video | Elizabeth McIntosh & Eli Bornowsky (Part 2)


Dexter Sinister discuss the exhibition An Invitation to An Infiltration, 2010. An ideal context for an examination of the competitive nature of group exhibitions was during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Organized by guest curator Eric Fredericksen, An Invitation to An Infiltration was a group exhibition of local and international artists ranging from emerging to established.

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Video | Dexter Sinister


Holly Ward discusses her work in the group exhibition An Invitation to An Infiltration, 2010. An ideal context for an examination of the competitive nature of group exhibitions was during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Organized by guest curator Eric Fredericksen, An Invitation to An Infiltration was a group exhibition of local and international artists ranging from emerging to established.

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Video | Holly Ward


As our contribution to Vancouver Design Week, the CAG worked with James Langdon, recipient of the 2012 Inform Award for Conceptual Design, presented by the Museum of Contemporary Art Leipzig, Germany. Langdon presented a short course and workshop in reading objects, environments and messages. Stimulated by the curious genre of design fiction, the programme asserts storytelling as the primary function of design. Langdon conducted a three day workshop on September 16–18 exploring narrative approaches to design, a series of connected exercises subjecting a collection of found materials to various manual and conceptual processes.

CAG volunteer Sara Khan writes about her experiences taking part in the three day workshop:

 

As an artist who enjoys telling stories through two dimensional media, the School for Design fiction workshop caught my attention; I was curious about what fiction through design could entail. On our first day we were asked to bring in three objects, organic or designed. People brought along things ranging from eggshells and apples to metal birds, buttons, bottles, and moth traps.

Before we started working on the activity set for the day James Langdon had us watch a short film. It replayed the same event but with slight variations with each iteration. A human figure used different objects in unconventional ways, from dumping food on a laptop to sitting on a book instead of reading it. At a glance the human figure came across a sort of a machine that had malfunctioned. Mulling over the film afterward made me wonder about why objects around us are operated the way they are and have a specific function or name, how come we almost use them like robots not really questioning their history, form or task.

Once we started talking about the objects we’d brought along and the workshop progressed; I realised more and more that in the everyday structure and organization of things and lives, we had forgotten to ponder the existence of what surrounds us. It reminded me of Sartre’s Antoine in “Nausea” and how he wonders about the bark of a tree and why it is considered to be black.

As we arranged and rearranged the items with each other, we saw how meaning was added to or subtracted from them. One of the last exercises led some of us to completely deconstruct the objects we were working with; which resulted in a lot of them either being completely stripped off their meaning or not changing at all, which was interesting to see.

By the end of the workshop though, I think, perhaps we were reading too much into everything, as humans often do; put anything before us and we’ll make up a story. At this point we watched a documentary about the Piltdown man. The film reminded me of the story of the Emperor’s New Clothes.

It is amazing how if you put forth a thought with enough conviction and confidence most people will believe it as the truth. It makes me wonder what falsehoods lurk in our histories.

So, as we wonder in awe at the totality of this existence, it is important to question the things we experience.

- Sara Khan

Check out a selection of books by James Langdon in the CAG book shop, on a specially dedicated shelf.

School for design fiction workbook

More Books by James Langdon.

James Langdon
A School for Design Fiction – workshop
16-18 September 2014, 6pm-9pm

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Sara Khan – The School for Design Fiction – A workshop with James Langdon


Last week I attended my first artist talk as the CAG’s Learning and Public Program assistant. New York and Toronto- based artist Brendan Fernandes is currently in Vancouver for a two month residency at the CAG Burrard Marina Field House Studio.

While in residence Fernandes will be developing a new solo dance piece, co-mentoring a summer intensive youth dance program, and leading a life drawing class that focuses on the dancer’s foot. On Tuesday, June 10th Fernandes gave an artist talk at the CAG where he led us through the creation, rehearsal, and performance processes of his recent works; The Working Move (2012), Encomium (2011), and Night Shift (2011).

(Find out more about Fernandes’ past and upcoming works on his website at www.brendanfernandes.ca)

Brendan’s talk was as charming and insightful as his work, which engages with various disciplines including visual arts, dance, performance and theatre. He explained how his work focuses on corporal and embodied lived experiences—which raises questions about “liveness versus stillness”, “space and audience” and “single action versus relational action”. The focus on the body challenges us to re-examine the aesthetics of his works—how do we react as spectators when the body becomes the object, the subject, the artifact and the archive? Fernandes’ works question how we conceive the space, time and performative codes of bodies moving in gallery and museum spaces. I’m stoked to follow Fernandes’ process this summer and find out how the new projects are shaping up!

- Lindsay Lachance

Click here for: Information regarding his Youth Intensive Dance Workshop

Listen to the artist talk here:

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Brendan Fernandes Talks the Talk and Talks About the Dancer’s Walk


Fresh in town from originally Windsor, via Montreal, Justin Langlois gave a talk at the Burrard Marina Field House about his ideas and his work on Saturday, August 17th. He brought with him a pamphlet of thought-provoking slices of his personal and artistic philosophy, which he flipped through over the duration of the talk as a prompt for further musings and discussion. He’s happy to share it with us in the images above, along with a video he made titled ‘Windsor is Forever’.

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Limits & Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life – by Justin Langlois


Nathan Crompton gave a lecture and discussion at the Burrard Marina Field House on Saturday, September 28th. We asked him a few questions in preparation for the event, and are now bringing you the second half of the session (the first part can be found here). We’re grateful for the insight and perspective that Nathan brings to this crucial and ever-timely subject matter and look forward to further expanding this dialogue with him and the community.

JB: For people who may not understand the complexity of the power relations embedded in gentrification and may therefore see neighbourhood improvement as simply that, how would you explain to them that the “polishing up” comes at a high cost to a basic, and long-compromised human right—especially for the (large) indigenous population of the area?

NC: That’s a difficult question. I might only be able to point to a contradiction. Currently our neoliberal cities are crumbling before our eyes, with the massive de-funding of basic services both in terms of the human and architectural infrastructure. I’m talking about an entire generation of infrastructure left behind by the welfare state, whether it’s Simon Fraser University, Heather Place or Little Mountain – they’re all in shambles as the war on the poor and working class intensifies. Social democracy, with all of its flaws and compromises – particularly its framework of patriarchal white supremacy – has now been replaced by neoliberalism.

Neoliberal urbanism states that improvements to the city can only be supported if they are funded privately, first by private capital and secondly by the retroactive bonuses, tax cuts and fee exemptions created by the municipal colonial state. Since being elected, Vision Vancouver has taken this model to its highest possible level, setting in motion an entire bureaucracy whose sole purpose is to move social funds upwards, particularly (but not exclusively) for the monopoly developers who fund the political apparatus. So the axiom of our generation is revitalization and improvements, yes, but the precondition is that these improvements only for those who can afford it, under the guise of urban revitalization. It is therefore hard today to discuss urban improvements in an abstract way, detached from class and colonialism. Who is benefitting from revitalization, who is losing out? Does it always have to be the propertied class who determine what is the “highest and best use”? Real-estate knows how to follow through on a process of colonization to gain returns on value, but can we respond with a new affirmation of value, independent from capitalist accumulation and the displacement of our communities? Those are some of the questions we’ve been asking.

JB: The pro-development side seems to argue that gentrification is justified by the fact that the residents in the DTES of today are not in a position to pay the requisite costs to live in a neighbourhood whose real estate potential is exorbitant. What they fail to realize is that the neighbourhood functions as a community and refuge for people who have largely been displaced and dispossessed previously—in some cases several times, by the same system that is trying to again remove them. How can we conceive of a way to bridge this gap between seeing a neighbourhood as dollar signs and seeing a neighbourhood as inhabited by a vulnerable population with a strong existing community?

NC: The events of Reconciliation are coming to a close here in Vancouver. Yesterday Vancouver City Council also apologized to the Japanese community for its motion in 1942 supporting the expulsion and internment of Japanese Canadians during the war. Now is a good time to ask, reflectively, if we want to continue repeating the mistakes of the past. Grace Eiko Thomson told city council that apologies and reconciliation mean nothing in the context of accelerating displacement and dispossession.

“For me, an apology is not enough unless it is followed up. Not for us, it’s too late for us. Most of us are gone. Most of us who experienced the internment are gone. It is so important we remember that what happened to us can happen to others. That is why I raise the Downtown Eastside because that is where we used to live. That is where we were displaced from. And the original people were the Coast Salish first nations who were originally displaced.

She continued: “For me, I really feel we have to be vigilant about other people who are still living in this area at the moment who are still socially and economically being excluded, particularly with this big talk about gentrification. The developers are moving in, the price of land is going up. So what does this mean for the people that are living there? Does that mean they are going to be displaced again? I hope not. This is the most important thing to me right now, that this doesn’t happen to another group of people. This is a unique community with a unique history and there are still people living here who may be displaced depending on how the city decided to act on this area…”

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Nathan Crompton Interview (Part 2 of 2)


Nathan Crompton hosted by Raymond Boisjoly
Burrard Marina Field House
Saturday September 28, 4 pm

This year marks 100 years since the dispossession of the Kitsilano Reserve, a year the city of Vancouver has also declared  the Year of Reconciliation.

Local writers Nathan Crompton and Maria Wallstam wrote an article in The Mainlander called City of perpetual displacement: 100 years since the destruction of the Kitsilano Reserve in July of this year. It explores the relationship between the rampant gentrification of the DTES & Grandview-Woodlands, and the colonial settlers’ unjust treatment of indigenous populations in the early 20th century. The article piqued the interest of our current Burrard Marina Field House artist in residence, Raymond Boisjoly, who identified that the Kitsilano Reserve discussed in the article is located in the exact same spot as the Burrard Marina Field House (1655 Whyte Avenue) where he’s been working for nearly six months. Throughout his residency at the Field House Boisjoly has been interested in the history of the land the Marina sits on. Crompton’s research and response to the dispossession of the Kits reserve aligns it with the current rash of forced evictions of low income residents in the DTES. A link can be drawn between Boisjoly and Crompton through their evocation of histories as a way to engage urgent current dialogues in the community.

For more detailed maps and history of the Kitsilano Indian Reserve lands go to UBC’s Indigenous foundations online mapping tool http://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/home/land-rights/mapping-tool-kitsilano-reserve.html.

- More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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Nathan Crompton talk at the Burrard Marina Field House


I think we should all be restless in where we are — not towards accumulation, but towards an urgency in wanting to better understand the world around us.”
– Justin Langlois

Justin Langlois has recently moved to Vancouver from Windsor, Ontario. He’ll be joining the Faculty of Culture + Community at Emily Carr University of Art & Design this Fall, and the CAG invited him to speak about his practice at the Burrard Marina Fieldhouse on Saturday, August 17th. He is co-founder and research director of Broken City Lab, an “artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore and unfold curiosities around locality, infrastructures, and creative practice leading towards civic change,” and he had lots to share about his background, but more so, his present and future.

He has developed his own brand of social rehabilitation in post-Fordist Windsor—a place which he believes is useful to think about in terms of potential opportunities, rather than as plagued by crisis. For Langlois, his entry into art was not one rooted in a studio practice, but instead in artistic efforts that mobilize several artists and ideas—like organizing rock shows, or producing a 200-copy newspaper. It seems inevitable that his small-town upbringing can be cited as an enabler for his enlightened sense of engagement and facilitation.

He touched on some key areas of the organization’s operational pedagogy and flipped through a small pamphlet (click here to view the pamphlet), sharing each page one-by-one. Each page expressed a carefully crafted opinion or idea that followed suit with its title, Limits and Possibilities: A Pamphlet on Gestures of Art, Education & Civic Life—a title originating from Langlois’ belief that it is easier to begin acting and creating within a defined area, instead of trying to wrangle with infinity. He talked about the necessity to re-think the words and terms that we have come to establish meanings for which are insufficient; things like social change, engagement, public participation, and education. He encouraged the audience to consider each point to act as an entry from which a larger conversation could develop, and people responded at the end with thoughtful and sincere rebuttals. It’s only a matter of time ‘til we see what kinds of projects Langlois brings to life in Vancouver.

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Artists in Public | Justin Langlois Talk


This is Part III of an interview with Burrard Marina Field House artist-in-residence Raymond Boisjoly and CAG Field House intern Jaclyn Bruneau. Preceding Part III was a Part I and II. Check ‘em out.

Afternoons with Raymond – PART III

JB: Can you talk a little bit about how your own heritage relates to your work? I know you’ve talked about challenging these more classical, traditional ways of representing indigenous cultures.

RB: Well it does come to inform my work, but not in any simple way. I have made works that sort of trade on traditional imagery. I’m always sort of concerned with making sure that the work doesn’t come to be mistaken for the thing it represents. I’m interested in my capacity as an indigenous artist to be able to make work about indigenous issues that doesn’t simply reduce that to me making work about indigenous issues because I am myself indigenous.
I would like to think that I am also making work about these things because they’re important to everyone. They concern certain circumstances that we’re all in the midst of that come to impact us in uneven ways. So it becomes something that I definitely want to make accessible in a way that is about it coming to have this capacity to communicate something of that experience but in a strange, unfamiliar, unforeseen way.

So my heritage comes to influence that and it’s kind of about seeing a certain possibility in that, in terms of making contemporary art that doesn’t have to come close to aboriginal cultural practices as it is known, but could potentially work towards creating some sort of intuitive change to things or a subtle way of actually just letting material come to do something in and of itself. It’s a complex process in that—in a lot of works, my heritage isn’t necessarily readable in it and I’m interested in that discrepancy, where it becomes sort of, like, a furtive presence. It ultimately requires a certain activity to understand that relationship.

JB: What other cultures have affected you and influenced your work?

RB: A lot of things I’ve been interested in have been about the analyses of subcultures. I look to music a lot. I look at a lot of things that primarily address ideas of cultural transformation as represented through popular music, like the strange idea that both funk and heavy metal are derived from rhythm and blues in a way that each musical form was subtly transformed in a certain transitional process to communicate to a particular audience at a given time and place, but somehow leads to these very divergent forms.

So I’m really interested in that thing where it scarcely becomes that thing that it’s going to be. At least, looking at funk and heavy metal—not specifically cultures, but subcultural forms—becomes an interesting analogy between, at least for me—in terms of trying to understand that process—simply conceiving of an artistic practice isn’t about knowing what it is but realizing that my work can come to transform my understanding of things I have done previously.

JB: What does digital culture have to do with all of this? I’m thinking about the LightJet prints that were on display in March and April which you created by dragging your iPhone around a flatbed scanner as it played musical performances from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Is there a particular comment you’re making by converging these multiple electronic processes of new and old?

RB: So they’re prints made by laser exposing the piece of paper. It’s processed like any photograph, so I guess that melding becomes a strange thing of finding some other sort of way to show the manner in which photography can index time. In a lot of cases, strangely, many of the scans that I made scanned right to left rather than left to right, so it creates these weird tensions that might not be visible. But I like that strange thing in which these different technologies come to function—that they can be used in these ways that they weren’t necessarily intended to be used for; to create some image of these different types of image-making. The ipod on the scanner leaves this layer in between the two of them—the dust and scratches on the glass, so it’s this strange thing of there being a depicted sort of material and an actual material, somehow.

I’m hearing all these stories about children’s intuitive use of touch screen technology that comes to affect the way that they expect printed magazines to function. It leads me to think of that strange thing where our encounter with visual material just creates this different relationship we have to it that is about interacting with it; seeing a certain capacity with it to touch it to make it work.

I think that process of using the ipods and the scanners means to—well, that easily manipulable aspect of it to hold an ipod in my hand—it’s sort of about stressing that physical manifestation of it. That it persists as an object that can be used in these weird ways. So it’s just a present capacity of an ipod and a scanner to produce an image in a very ad hoc way.

JB: Tell us about some of the books on your shelves.

RB: [Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language], I’m looking at it because I’m teaching a course that is ostensibly about text-based art. The book is this really amazing thing—there are chapters in it that deal with the use of geological metaphors and biological metaphors in our understanding of language… so the idea that a language could be said to die as being a biological metaphor. Looking at shifts, thinking of the way in which language shifts where two languages can come to encounter one another and have subtle effects on one another is often discussed in terms of geology. So it’s a really amazing in the sense that it finds all this incredibly rich imagery in the way people sort of discuss language; and what people expect of it.

JB: How does it read?

RB: It’s quite academic, but really kind of a fascinating thing in the sense that it’s episodic. I know a lot of these started as individual articles—like, H & Co. was first published in Cabinet. So it reads very easily in the sense that it’s not very demanding and fairly short and accessible. So it’s a really incredible book that I’ve been returning to for quite a while and that I’m excited to finally be able to share with students.

JB: Where are you at with the course?

RB: I’m teaching it at Emily Carr and there’s a lot of planning to do for it this month [August].

JB: What else have you got in that pile?

RB: [chuckles] What else?

JB: Show me one more.

RB: Well, there’s this incredible Jimmie Durham catalog—A Matter of Life and Death and Singing. [Begins flipping through the book and does not stop until his response concludes]. This is part of a career-long retrospective. It’s this incredible document that is exciting in the sense that it seems tied to a lot of these other things, like a collection of his poetry and critical writings that are also coming out, but he’s just someone that I really admire and it’s nice to see this kind of extended document concerning his career.

JB: Thank you so much for your time.

RB: No problem.

Raymond Boisjoly is currently the artist-in-residence at the CAG Field House at Burrard Marina. The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

More of Jaclyn’s writing can be found here, and her tweets over here.

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Afternoons with Raymond – Part III


Hello one and all,

I’m Jaclyn Bruneau, the CAG Field House intern currently working with Raymond Boisjoly during his summer artist-in-residence at the Burrard Marina Field House Studio. I’ll be keeping people in the loop about his activities, and with Field House events by reporting in this blog. Look for posts with the ‘Field House Studio’ blog category and keep your dials tuned in.

A few Saturdays ago, Raymond and I spent the afternoon at False Creek Community Centre where he led a workshop as part of the Vancouver Draw Down, that very cool single-day drawing festival that invites Vancouverites to access various types of drawing workshops for free, held in over 23 locations city wide. The workshop was titled Re-Inventing Drawing and began invitingly with tables scattered with pipe cleaners, masking tape, paper cups, tree branches, string, scissors, pieces of paper big and small, and a ton of markers all of which were used together or separately to create fantastically experimental gestural marks on paper.

Our first two visitors were a pair of twins named Alex and Liam, who seemed to have made use of all the materials. They taped felts all around the parameter of the paper cup; strung together branches, attaching a pen on each end and then twirling the contraption above paper; and stuck felts through holes in foamy paper. Their mom seemed blown away at all the things they came up with. Some others made contraptions with the branches that allowed two people to each take hold of a part of the branch, and proceed to see if they could collaboratively render an image they thought up together beforehand. Raymond even drew my attention to a mystery visitor who got carried away with their new tools on the hardwood floor (oops!). Above are some photos from the workshop.

During the afternoon’s workshop the space was flooded with natural light and we left the doors wide open, so people walking the path outside could peek in and join. We met daughters and dads, kids in strollers, couples, best friends, and even a few grandparents. It was amazing how little instruction everyone needed. They seemed full of ideas, and were very eager–especially those itching to fill their Draw Down passports with stamps. I floated around taking photos and getting people started. Raymond seemed to know exactly what to say in the way of inspiration for those stuck for an idea.

- Jaclyn, whose writing and photos you can check out here, and tweets over here.

The Field House Studio Residency Program is generously supported by the Vancouver Park Board and the City of Vancouver. The inaugural residency with Raymond Boisjoly is supported by the Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of Advanced Education, Innovation and Technology.

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News from the Field House & fun with Draw Down!


Last Friday night the CAG hosted a public conversation between art historian and critic Jan Verwoert and local artist Elizabeth McIntosh. McIntosh is currently exhibiting a solo show entitled Violet’s Hair at the gallery. The event drew in a huge crowd, filling the gallery to full capacity, and engaged the audience in a dialogue about contemporary practices of painting.

A big thank you to both Jan and Elizabeth for their participation!

Here are some of the pictures from the evening.

 

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Jan Verwoert and Elizabeth McIntosh Public Conversation


Kyla Mallet gave a slide presentation entitled ‘How to See and Read the Aura: Finding the Invisible’ this past Wednesday at EVERY LETTER IN THE ALPHABET. There was a good turnout and the question period led to some great discussions.

Here are some photos from the evening.

 

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Slide Presentation By Kyla Mallett


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