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  • Julia Dault Blame It On the Rain May 1 to June 28, 2015 BC Binning and Alvin Balkind Galleries The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a major solo exhibition by Toronto-born, New York–based artist Julia Dault. Through a selection of new and recent works, the exhibition reveals the importance to Dault of balancing spontaneous gesture with responsiveness to rules, logic and the constraints of materials. Physical negotiations are central to Dault’s textured paintings and improvised sculptures; both are exhibited in Blame It On the Rain. Dault is interested in ‘embodied knowledge’ — how making is thinking — and reinserts the artist’s hand into a minimal aesthetic primarily interpreted as distanced and industrial. The artist’s rule-based painting involves responding to mass-produced elements — patterned silks, pleather, unmixed paint straight from the tube — with unconventional tools, such as squeegees, rubber combs and sea sponges. The limitations of these objects create quasi-standardized gestures that allow Dault to skirt the line between expressive abstraction and cool, machine-like facture. Erasure of her paintings’ topmost layers, which allows viewers to ‘see into’ the painting process, is as important to Dault as paint application. Exploration of artistic labor recurs in Dault’s sculptures. Always improvising on site and working alone, the artist manipulates and coerces Plexiglas, Formica and other industrially produced materials into imposing curved forms, then affixes them to the gallery wall using straps and cords. Dault’s efforts can be understood as ‘private performances’ in which her physical capabilities are juxtaposed with the properties of the materials she employs. Each sculpture is titled with a time stamp that reflects the duration it took to complete the piece. In this gesture, as with her paintings, she hopes to underline the durational nature of the art-making process. Dault’s work fuses the emphasis on process found in both Abstract Expressionist painting and post-Minimal sculpture. One unifying element is the artist’s fascination with patterns, and with the slippages and imperfections that reveal the human origins of what appears mechanical. Another is the search for variety within strict limitations. By devising expressive gestures through rules and reasoning indicative of post-Minimal and Conceptual art, Dault is part of a generation of artists acknowledging histories and legacies of art making while revitalizing abstraction today. The exhibition complements Color Me Badd, presented at The Power Plant, Toronto in 2014-2015. The two institutions are working together on the first major monograph of Dault’s work, to be published by Black Dog Publishing later in 2015. The publication is made with generous support from the RBC Emerging Artist Project. BIO Julia Dault lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She has held solo exhibitions at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2015); The Power Plant, Toronto and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles (2014); Galerie Bob van Orsouw, Zurich and Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto (2013); and White Cube Bermondsey, London (2012). She has also participated in group shows which include: Elevated, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (2014-2015), Americana: Selections from the Collection, Pérez Art Museum, Miami (2013–2014); Outside the Lines, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (2013–2014); In the Heart of the Country, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Inner Journeys, Maison Particulière, Brussels (2013); The Ungovernables, New Museum, New York; Roundtable, the Ninth Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2012); and Making Is Thinking, Witte de With, Rotterdam (2011). Her work is in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; Saatchi Gallery, London; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Dault is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York; Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto; and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles. MORE
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    01 May, 2015 – 28 Jun, 2015
    Julia Dault, Blame It On the Rain, installation view. Photograph SITE Photography.
  • Shannon Bool Michelangelo’s Place May 1 to June 28, 2015 The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the second part of a new commission in 2015 with Canadian artist Shannon Bool. Bool typically references a wide variety of art historical objects in her work, commenting on the role of decorative arts within art history, as well as on the change in meaning that occurs through the replication and alteration of significant cultural forms. Central to her practice is the paradoxical examination of the depth and psychological weight that surfaces carry, which she underlines in unorthodox material processes. Located near to the gallery entrance is Michelangelo’s Place, the final version in a series of carrara marble benches Bool has recently produced.  The sculpture references the benches found circling the elevated Piazzale Michelangelo in Florence, built in 1869 to showcase copies of Michelangelo’s most famous works and to provide a panoramic view of the city. At the Contemporary Art Gallery, Bool’s sculpture references the benches’ scale and appropriates the graffiti that covers them.  The graffiti, some of which is over 100 years old and ranges from tourist scribbles, love declarations and Italy’s first Labour Party, is mirrored to emphasize its materialization and the artist’s handwork. These energetic gestures of incision, gouging and defacing subvert the benches’ functionality by drawing attention to the individual experiences of the Piazzale’s visitors who chose to leave their own marks instead of consuming the magnificent views of the renaissance.  The carrara marble, signifying wealth and high renaissance material values is subjected instead to the every day banality of Florentine life and tourism, where the public turns away from its master narrative and carves its own signature. Shannon Bool lives and works in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include: The Fourth Wall Through the Third Eye, Galerie Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf; Walk Like an Etruscan, Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto (2013); The Inverted Harem II, Bonner Kunstverein (2011);  CRAC Alsace, Altkirch, France; The Inverted Harem, GAK-Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen (2010); RMIT Project Space, Melbourne, Australia (2008). Group exhibitions include MMK2 Boom She Boom, Works from the MMK Collection, Frankfurt (2015); The Klöntal Triennale, Kunsthaus Glarus, Switzerland (2014); Soft Pictures, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaugengo, Turin (2013); Painting Forever!, KW, Berlin (2013); Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, Toronto (2013); the Sprengel Museum, Hannover (2012); 7×14, Kunsthalle Baden-Baden; Rock Opera, CACP Museum of Contemporary Art, Bordeaux (2009); Drawing on Sculpture: Graphic Interventions on the Photographic Surface, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds (2007); Make Your Move, Projects Arts Centre, Dublin; Spiralen der Erinnerung, Kunstverein in Hamburg; Carbonic Anhydride, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin (2006). Work is held in the collections of The National Gallery of Canada, Berlinische Galerie, Berlin; Fondazione Sandretto, Turin, MMK Museum fur Modern Kunst, Frankfurt am Main; Lenbachhaus, Munich, and the Saatchi Collection, London. She is represented by Kadel Willborn Gallery in Düsseldorf and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto. MORE
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    01 May, 2015 – 28 Jun, 2015
    Shannon Bool, ‘Michelangelo’s Place’, 2015. Photograph SITE Photography.
  • Maddie Leach June to July Taking up residency in June, Maddie Leach will begin research towards a Vancouver-based project. Leach’s practice is one that seeks ways of making artworks as a means to interpret and respond to specific context, through a lengthy process of enquiry and social interaction establishing relationships between form, materials, locations, histories, events, individuals and communities. Leach was nominated for the Walters Prize 2014 for If you find the good oil let us know (2012–›2014), created during a two year residency at Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, a town known for its oil and gas exploration on New Zealand’s North Island. The project centered on 70 ‚litres of supposed ‘whale oil’. With layered and complex associations to whaling from indigenous sustenance to colonial/capitalist industry, whale oil speaks to New Zealand’s past and evokes its new economic boom in crude oil exploration. Leach sought to return this mythic substance to the sea, beginning a tangential journey that ended with a cube of cement made from the firing of 70 litres of mineral oil relocated to the seabed several kilometres off the coast. Through such ephemeral aesthetic actions and an unfolding public dialogue, this search for the authenticity of the ‘whale oil’ connected fragmented industrial and cultural narratives central to the context of New Zealand. Sharing her unfolding research, Leach then invited fourteen individuals to offer written letters as responses to the work, the only stipulation being to begin the letter with ‘Dear.’ The texts became a series of ‘Letters to the Editor’ in the Taranaki Daily News developing a curious narrative composed by multiple authors, from scientists to sailors, cement workers to oil-industry executives. MORE
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    07 Jun, 2015 – 14 Jul, 2015
    Maddie Leach, If you find the good oil let us know (2012 - 2014) New Plymouth, New Zealand. Photograph by Shaun Waugh.
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Current Exhibitions

Julia Dault
Blame It On the Rain
May 1 to June 28, 2015
BC Binning and Alvin Balkind Galleries

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents a major solo exhibition by Toronto-born, New York–based artist Julia Dault. Through a selection of new and recent works, the exhibition reveals the importance to Dault of balancing spontaneous gesture with responsiveness to rules, logic and the constraints of materials. Physical negotiations are central to Dault’s textured paintings and improvised sculptures; both are exhibited in Blame It On the Rain.

Dault is interested in ‘embodied knowledge’ — how making is thinking — and reinserts the artist’s hand into a minimal aesthetic primarily interpreted as distanced and industrial. The artist’s rule-based painting involves responding to mass-produced elements — patterned silks, pleather, unmixed paint straight from the tube — with unconventional tools, such as squeegees, rubber combs and sea sponges. The limitations of these objects create quasi-standardized gestures that allow Dault to skirt the line between expressive abstraction and cool, machine-like facture. Erasure of her paintings’ topmost layers, which allows viewers to ‘see into’ the painting process, is as important to Dault as paint application.

Exploration of artistic labor recurs in Dault’s sculptures. Always improvising on site and working alone, the artist manipulates and coerces Plexiglas, Formica and other industrially produced materials into imposing curved forms, then affixes them to the gallery wall using straps and cords. Dault’s efforts can be understood as ‘private performances’ in which her physical capabilities are juxtaposed with the properties of the materials she employs. Each sculpture is titled with a time stamp that reflects the duration it took to complete the piece. In this gesture, as with her paintings, she hopes to underline the durational nature of the art-making process.

Dault’s work fuses the emphasis on process found in both Abstract Expressionist painting and post-Minimal sculpture. One unifying element is the artist’s fascination with patterns, and with the slippages and imperfections that reveal the human origins of what appears mechanical. Another is the search for variety within strict limitations. By devising expressive gestures through rules and reasoning indicative of post-Minimal and Conceptual art, Dault is part of a generation of artists acknowledging histories and legacies of art making while revitalizing abstraction today.

The exhibition complements Color Me Badd, presented at The Power Plant, Toronto in 2014-2015. The two institutions are working together on the first major monograph of Dault’s work, to be published by Black Dog Publishing later in 2015. The publication is made with generous support from the RBC Emerging Artist Project.

BIO
Julia Dault lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She has held solo exhibitions at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2015); The Power Plant, Toronto and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles (2014); Galerie Bob van Orsouw, Zurich and Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto (2013); and White Cube Bermondsey, London (2012). She has also participated in group shows which include: Elevated, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (2014-2015), Americana: Selections from the Collection, Pérez Art Museum, Miami (2013–2014); Outside the Lines, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (2013–2014); In the Heart of the Country, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Inner Journeys, Maison Particulière, Brussels (2013); The Ungovernables, New Museum, New York; Roundtable, the Ninth Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2012); and Making Is Thinking, Witte de With, Rotterdam (2011). Her work is in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; Saatchi Gallery, London; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.

Dault is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York; Jessica Bradley Gallery, Toronto; and China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles.

MORE

Julia Dault - Blame It On the Rain


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Current Exhibitions

Shannon Bool
Michelangelo’s Place
May 1 to June 28, 2015

The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the second part of a new commission in 2015 with Canadian artist Shannon Bool. Bool typically references a wide variety of art historical objects in her work, commenting on the role of decorative arts within art history, as well as on the change in meaning that occurs through the replication and alteration of significant cultural forms. Central to her practice is the paradoxical examination of the depth and psychological weight that surfaces carry, which she underlines in unorthodox material processes.

Located near to the gallery entrance is Michelangelo’s Place, the final version in a series of carrara marble benches Bool has recently produced.  The sculpture references the benches found circling the elevated Piazzale Michelangelo in Florence, built in 1869 to showcase copies of Michelangelo’s most famous works and to provide a panoramic view of the city.

At the Contemporary Art Gallery, Bool’s sculpture references the benches’ scale and appropriates the graffiti that covers them.  The graffiti, some of which is over 100 years old and ranges from tourist scribbles, love declarations and Italy’s first Labour Party, is mirrored to emphasize its materialization and the artist’s handwork. These energetic gestures of incision, gouging and defacing subvert the benches’ functionality by drawing attention to the individual experiences of the Piazzale’s visitors who chose to leave their own marks instead of consuming the magnificent views of the renaissance.  The carrara marble, signifying wealth and high renaissance material values is subjected instead to the every day banality of Florentine life and tourism, where the public turns away from its master narrative and carves its own signature.

Shannon Bool lives and works in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include: The Fourth Wall Through the Third Eye, Galerie Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf; Walk Like an Etruscan, Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto (2013); The Inverted Harem II, Bonner Kunstverein (2011);  CRAC Alsace, Altkirch, France; The Inverted Harem, GAK-Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen (2010); RMIT Project Space, Melbourne, Australia (2008). Group exhibitions include MMK2 Boom She Boom, Works from the MMK Collection, Frankfurt (2015); The Klöntal Triennale, Kunsthaus Glarus, Switzerland (2014); Soft Pictures, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaugengo, Turin (2013); Painting Forever!, KW, Berlin (2013); Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, Toronto (2013); the Sprengel Museum, Hannover (2012); 7×14, Kunsthalle Baden-Baden; Rock Opera, CACP Museum of Contemporary Art, Bordeaux (2009); Drawing on Sculpture: Graphic Interventions on the Photographic Surface, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds (2007); Make Your Move, Projects Arts Centre, Dublin; Spiralen der Erinnerung, Kunstverein in Hamburg; Carbonic Anhydride, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin (2006). Work is held in the collections of The National Gallery of Canada, Berlinische Galerie, Berlin; Fondazione Sandretto, Turin, MMK Museum fur Modern Kunst, Frankfurt am Main; Lenbachhaus, Munich, and the Saatchi Collection, London. She is represented by Kadel Willborn Gallery in Düsseldorf and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto.

MORE

Shannon Bool - Michelangelo’s Place


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Current Events

LIQUIDATE: An art publication sale by Contemporary Art Gallery, Access Gallery, Fillip, New Documents, Presentation House Gallery, Or Gallery and Western Front

We’ve been busy spring cleaning. The Contemporary Art Gallery, Access Gallery, Fillip, New Documents, Presentation House Gallery, Or Gallery and Western Front have joined forces to bring you some serious discounts on art publications new and old.  This one time only evening sale is not to be missed.

The evening is sponsored by Jameson Whiskey.
We invite you to enjoy our specialty cocktail: The Librarian for a modest donation of $5.

WHEN: Thursday, May 28, 5-9pm
WHERE: Access Gallery: 222 East Georgia Street, Vancouver

Contemporary Art Gallery sample titles on sale:
Every building on 100 West Hastings – Stan Douglas
DONKY@NINJA@WITCH – FASTWÜRMS
You are my sunshine/You are my nebula – Euan MacDonald
Brian Jungen
Cabin Photographs – Scott McFarland

About Access Gallery:
An artist-run centre established in 1991, Access Gallery is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and presenting the work of emergent artists, curators and cultural practitioners, as well as those entering a new experimental phase of their practice. We enable critical conversations and risk taking through new configurations of audience, artists and community.

Access Gallery sample titles on sale:
Unsuitable as an Institution: The Tenacity of Access Gallery 1992—2014
Far Away So Close, Part I
Far Away So Close, Part II
Ian Johnston: Reinventing Consumption
Encyclonospace Iranica
Life After Doomsday: Jason de Haan
The Ever-Changing Light: Raymond Boisjoly

About Fillip and New Documents:
Fillip is a Vancouver-based publishing organization formed in 2004 to expand spaces for critical discussions on contemporary art. Through a magazine and publications program, Fillip provides platforms for examining the relationship between art and society. New Documents is a Los Angeles and Vancouver-based art book publisher.

Fillip and New Documents sample titles on sale:
Downing Street
Yes, But Is It Edible?
Culture Industry
Fillip 19
Institutions by Artists

About Or Gallery:
The Or Gallery is an artist-run centre committed to exhibiting work by local, national and international artists whose art practice is of a critical, conceptual and/or interdisciplinary nature. The Or Gallery has published various works including artist books, record/sound works and critical anthologies. It also runs a small bookstore focused on artists’ publishing, including artist books, zines, periodicals, criticism and theory.

Or Gallery sample titles on sale:
12 Sun Songs, Cranfield & Slade (this is a record)
Ten Shows, Barb Choit
Exercises in Kinesthetic Drawing and Other Drawing, Aaron Carpenter
Vancouver Anthology, ed. Stan Douglas
The D’Or Series (Food for Thought, Notes on Collaboration, Explorations in Psychic Geography, Goin’ Solo)

About Presentation House Gallery:
Presentation House Gallery’s mandate is to exhibit and disseminate photography and media art, emphasizing contemporary Canadian work within a context of historical and international art. Since 1984 they have produced over 100 publications, featuring a diverse range of artists and exhibitions. In 2006 the gallery launched the Lynn Valley series of artist-designed publications. This series has featured books by a wide range of contemporary artists including: Richard Prince, Jonathan Monk and Annette Kelm. Presentation House Gallery aims to offer the community a range of experiences which will engage viewers with new considerations about the world in which they live.

PHG sample titles on sale:
Active Process: Artist’s Books Photographic and ContemporaryTwenty-eight  U.S. and Canadian Artists
Death and the Family, Gisele Amantea, Marian Penner Bancroft, Wyn Geleynse, etc.
Facing History: Portraits from Vancouver
Judy Radul: People Things Enter Exit
Attila Richard Lukacs / POLAROIDS / Michael Morris

About Western Front:
Established in 1973 the Western Front is one of Canada’s leading artist-run-centers for contemporary art and new music.  We produce and present visual art, exhibitions, new music concerts and workshops, media-art residencies, performance art and other artist driven initiatives. The Western Front currently maintains programs in Exhibitions, Media Art and New Music, as well as an extensive archive of audio-visual materials. Through this diverse programming we continue to be a crucial platform for interdisciplinary, experimental art practices in Canada and internationally.

Western Front sample titles on sale:
Ritual In Contemporary Performance
Eternal Network: Videos from the Western Front Archive
Recipes For An Encounter
The F Word
Marian Penner Bancroft: Two Places at Once: Transfigured Wood Part IV

MORE

LIQUIDATE: An art publication sale by Contemporary Art Gallery, Access Gallery, Fillip, Presentation House Gallery, New Documents, Or Gallery and Western Front


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Learning Resources

In this artist talk, Meric Algün Ringborg discusses her practice, exploring the critical underpinning and key themes of her work.

She exhibited at the CAG in 2013 with the solo exhibition Metatext  is currently featured in La Biennale di Venezia 2015, the 56th International exhibition.

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Artist Talk | Meriç Algün Ringborg


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Recent Posts

Located near to the gallery entrance, Michelangelo’s Place is the final version in a series of marble benches Bool has recently produced. The sculpture references the benches found circling the elevated Piazzale Michelangelo in Florence, Italy built in 1869 to showcase copies of Michelangelo’s most famous works and to provide a stunning panoramic view of the city. Working in Vancouver for three weeks prior to the opening, Bool reproduced the exact graffiti that covers some of the benches.

Read on for a behind-the-scenes report by CAG Program Assistant, Jas Lally on the delicate installation of the new sculptural commission Michelangelo’s Place by Berlin-based, Comox, BC born artist Shannon Bool:

 

On the day of the installation of Michelangelo’s Place, Shannon and I had many phone calls back and forth with each other trying to come up with a Plan B, because it had been raining ALL DAY! We were lucky that a few hours before the install the sun came out and we were able to prep the dry ground – who knew Bianca Carrara marble was such a finicky material.

When the pieces arrived, the bench looked much bigger than I thought it was going to be. The four legs were easy to carry and place in front of the CAG, but when it came to the bench top things got a little more tricky. The top had to be balanced on a dolly that looked like a unicycle! I could see Shannon and assistant Teal holding onto the sides of the bench top for dear life as it was steered down the sidewalk with passerby’s giving us very curious looks.With the bench legs positioned in the perfect spot the top was affixed, then with the right amount of glue the job was done. I was surprised how easily and quickly all the pieces came together.

The bench has been installed for a week now and visitors have been engaging with the bench by taking a moment to sit on it and read some of the one hundred year old Italian graffiti. Even all the little furry friends in the neighbourhood have been giving the bench curious sniffs!If you haven’t already, stop by and take a moment to sit on the bench and visit also Julia Dault’s exhibition Blame It On the Rain!

- Jas Lally

MORE

Behind the Scenes with Shannon Bool


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